South Asia Open Archives (SAOA)

New on Databases A-Z : SOUTH ASIA OPEN ARCHIVES (SAOA)

South Asia Open Archives

From the  archive website:

“The South Asia Open Archives (SAOA), a subset of the South Asia Materials Project (SAMP), creates and maintains a collection of open access materials for the study of South Asia. This major collaborative initiative is aimed at addressing the current scarcity of digital resources pertinent to South Asia studies and at making collections more widely accessible both to North American scholars and to researchers worldwide.”

Access the South Asia Open Archives (SAOA) via the Databases A-Z.

 

Database usage statistics 2018-2019

database usage graph

This ia an update on database usage at the University of Cambridge.

Total database usage increased by 10.9% in 2018-2019.

Searches, result clicks and record view increased by 10.4%, 9.7% and 12.7% respectively.

There were in total:
  • 1.4 million searches,
  • 3.0 million result clicks and
  • 3.6 million record views (i.e. full text downloads)
The top 10 most used databases are as follows:
Database Statistic 2018-19 total
Ovid MEDLINE(R) Record views 919,646
Proquest databases (all) Record views 807,093
Embase Record views 675,356
Scopus Record views 166,125
Oxford English Dictionary Searches 148,137
Springer-Protocols Record views 131,767
Web of Science Record views 131,527
18th C. Collections Online Record views 128,979
BMJ Best Practice Record views 124,798
Oxford Dictionaries Searches 107,435

Jisc geospatial data gives academics access to millions of open data maps

Re-posted from Jisc News.

Integration of Airbus’ Vision-1 satellite imagery and the GeoSeer search tool give students and academics access to millions of open access geographical data sets

Jisc is pleased to announce the launch of the improved Jisc geospatial data service providing universities and colleges easy and free access to more than 1.6 million geographical datasets from around the world, including the most comprehensive index of maps ever brought together.

The service features the implementation of a new search tool, GeoSeer, and the access to Airbus’ Vision-1 satellite imagery.

The Jisc service brings open data and licensed data together in one interface, integrating GeoSeer which can search for spatial data by location and subject. It also offers the opportunity to review multiple search results at once by overlaying any of the datasets to study and compare changes in the landscape over time.

Phil Brownnett, head of UK programmes at Airbus Defence and Space – Intelligence said:

“We are very pleased to have been working with Jisc to provide academics and students easy access to valuable datasets, especially Vision-1 high-resolution satellite data. We are committed to empowering researchers and this will help transform their geographical work.”

Early next year, Airbus’ Vision-1 satellite imagery will complete this dataset, allowing researchers to focus on specific locations across the world, with fine and up-to-date details. Jisc is looking to work with universities to explore how the GeoSeer tool and Vision-1 data can enhance research, teaching and learning.

Cam Swift, geospatial data service development manager at Jisc, said:

“We worked with Airbus to integrate GeoSeer into our service, bringing together over 1.6 million open source maps and licensed data into one easy to use interface. This will make it easier for students, academics and researchers to use geographical information.

“Users can log into one service bringing together open access and licensed geography data and working with them seamlessly.”

Jonathan Moules, founder of GeoSeer said:

“It’s great to see all of this data made readily available to so many people. Freely available geographical data is really hard to find using conventional means and GeoSeer was developed to ameliorate that. Now thousands in academia have access to this data and can utilise it by simply typing in a search term and then add their desired search layers.”

Nature Electronics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z :Nature Electronics

From the  website for the journal website:

“Nature Electronics publishes both fundamental and applied research across all areas of electronics, from the study of novel phenomena and devices, to the design, construction and wider application of electronic circuits. It also covers commercial and industrial aspects of electronics research. The journal focuses on the development of technology and on understanding the impact such developments could have on society. Nature Electronics incorporates the research of scientists, engineers and industry, and provides comment, review and analysis of the key issues shaping the field and the key technologies reshaping society.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from 2018 Volume 1 number 1 to present.

Access Nature Electronics via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Trial resource: Vetlexicon

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to Vetlexicon, the veterinary medicine resource from Vetstream.

Access Vetlexicon via this link.

Access is enabled from 5 November 2019 up to 31 January 2020.

Please tell us what you think about this resource by completing the feedback form.  Thank you.

Vetstream Vetlexicon Canis, Felis, Lapis and Equis (dogs, cats, rabbits and horses) services are  online encyclopaedias of point-of-care clinical veterinary information.

The content is provided by 900 of the world’s leading veterinary clinicians and includes more than 19,000 peer-reviewed articles on diseases and their pathogens, diagnostic tests, medical and surgical treatments as well as breeds and owner factsheets and images, videos and heart sounds.

The content is categorised into 30 body systems and disciplines and cross-linked to each other. This allows the veterinarian to move between all the relevant information relating to a particular case, enabling them to diagnose, treat and effectively communicate all the relevant information to the owner.

 

Trial access: Making of Modern Law – Foreign, Comparative, and International law, 1600-1926

Trial access is now available for the University of Cambridge to the Making of Modern Law – Foreign, Comparative, and International Law, 1600-1926 e-resource.

Access the trial via this link until 29 November 2019.

Please tell us what you think about this resource using the feedback form here.  Thank you.

Making of Modern Law (MOML) is a series of nine collections of which the University Library, with the Squire Law Library, acquired the Legal Treatises collection in 2017.

Each collection comprises a range of analytical, theoretical, and practical literature, supporting the study of law by providing valuable resources form the most influential writers throughout history.

The Foreign, Comparative, and International Law, 1600-1926 collection comprises study treatises and a range of other legal documents from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, several hundred classics since the seventeenth century, and book sources that compare legal systems across the world.

This archive collects them all in one place and features the work of some of the great legal theorists, including Gentili, Selden, Zouche, and more.

It is a resource to explore the roots of English common law in the recesses of European history, with access to texts on Ancient Roman, Jewish, and Islamic law.

Gentili, Alberico – In titulum Digestorum De verborum significatione commentarius, 1614