Oxford bibliographies online: Chinese studies

New for eresources@cambridge: Oxford bibliographies online in Chinese studies.

Oxford Bibliographies in Chinese Studies is a multi- and inter-disciplinary enterprise covering the study of China across all disciplines. It developed mainly from two sources. First, a long-standing tradition of Sinology, still strong in Europe, has used philological and literary tools to study mainly the humanities and pre-modern China. Second, from the Second World War, an “area studies” approach – initially closely linked to US foreign policy needs and remaining predominant in the US, Canada and Australia – has focused on modern China using interdisciplinary (mainly social science) methods. More recently, China’s rapid growth has led to the rapid expansion of the field, while scholars originally from the PRC have led a trend to identify primarily with a discipline rather than an area.

Many China scholars still feel, however, that scholarship on China has had too little influence on the disciplines. The core ideas of most social sciences originate mainly from Western experience and have only sporadically taken China into account. This, however, is changing. For example, Kenneth Pomeranz’s The Great Divergence has made it difficult to discuss early modern economic development without taking account of China.

Studies of China within China are, of course, studies of the self rather than the other. Concepts originating with Chinese scholars have long been central to Western understandings of many issues, such as the emergence of Chinese nationalism. From the 1950s to the 1970s, however, scholarship in China was so dominated by Marxist dogma that its methods and conclusions were of limited interest to scholars elsewhere. This situation has changed dramatically since the 1980s: whole disciplines such as sociology have re-emerged, and modern social science methods have been introduced, often by scholars returning to China after study in the West. The volume of production has increased massively. Although this varies in quality even more than in the West, the best work, especially in disciplines like economics and sociology, is now at the forefront of research.

Oxford Bibliographies in Chinese Studies provides an authoritative guide to the key works across the whole field, pointing researchers and practitioners at all levels to the most important scholarship in European languages as well as in Chinese (and Japanese), and giving scholars working in other fields easier access to scholarship on China. The subjects covered in the initial launch provide broad guidance to major areas of study, while later additions focus more specifically on key issues or topics of debate.

Oxford bibliographies online: Classics

Adding to Oxford bibliographies online in Anthropology, Atlantic history, British & Irish literature, Criminology, Film and media studies, International relations, Medieval studies, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology, the University of Cambridge now has access to the Oxford bibliography online in Classics.

“The study of the ancient world is a cornerstone of Western scholarship. It possesses a long history with a rich, well-established critical literature, and it is also a highly active field, which constantly produces new discoveries, interpretations, and theories. In addition to a vast body of scholarship, Classical Studies has been quick to move online so that today’s students and researchers have ready access to key primary source texts and a range of electronic resources. Oxford Bibliographies in Classics provides students and scholars with a reliable and authoritative solution to the problem of information overload in all media.” — OUP, Classics OBO About page.

Early European Books Collections 3 and 4

The University Library is delighted to announce that the JISC has negotiated with ProQuest to make available to UK HE institutions collections 1-4 of the Early European Books resource.   This extends the access for Cambridge to include collections 3 and 4.

Collection 3 is substantially larger than the previous collections, containing 3 million pages in total, from more than 10,000 volumes scanned at four different libraries. It encompasses works in all major European languages, printed in the cities which led the explosion of the print industry in the early modern era, such as Nuremberg, Basel, Leiden, Paris and Venice. This breadth of scope gives a wide-ranging overview of the intellectual life and historical upheavals of early modern Europe. The collection contains the founding works of modern sciences such as botany, anatomy and astrology, together with accounts of travel, exploration and warfare, and influential works of literature, philosophy and humanist thought. In the field of religion, users will find editions of the works of the Church Fathers, early Bible editions in Latin, Greek, Hebrew and vernacular translations, missals, psalters and breviaries, Protestant sermons and tracts, and Counter-Reformation publications of the Catholic Church.

The volumes for Collection 3 are taken from the following libraries:

  • Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze (National Central Library of Florence, Italy)
  • Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands)
  • The Wellcome Library, London
  • Det Kongelige Bibliotek (Royal Library, Copenhagen)

Highlights of Collection 3 include:

  • History of Science: the Wellcome Library’s collection ranges from scholarly editions and translations of the works of Galen, Galileo, Dioscorides, Fuchs and Aldrovandi to books on alchemy, demonology, falconry and cookery (La Varenne’s Le cuisinier françois, 1656, is the founding text of modern French cuisine), so-called books of secrets (containing recipes for medicines and household remedies, including Latin, Italian, Spanish and German editions of Alessio Piemontese’s De Secretis) and books of prodigies (such as Pierre Boaistuau’s illustrated catalogue of monsters, demons, deformities, natural disasters and miraculous events, Histoires prodigieuses, 1568).
  • Philosophy: works by René Descartes (Principia Philosophiae, 1644; Les Passions de l’ame, 1650), Baruch Spinoza (editions of the Tractatus theologico-politicus in Latin, 1670 and French, 1678) and key humanist and Renaissance authors.
  • History: pamphlets from the Koninklijke Bibliotheek relating to the Dutch Revolt against Spanish rule, the persecution of the Huguenots, and the assassination of William of Orange.
  • Fine art and illustrations: Albrecht Dürer’s Four Books on Human Proportion (Arnhem, 1622), and volumes with engravings by Jacob de Gheyn (Waffenhandlvng, or The Exercise of Arms; Amsterdam, 1608), Johan Bara (Emblemata amatoria, Netherlands, c.1620) and Jöst Amman (Panoplia, Frankfurt, 1568).
  • Fine examples of the art of printing, from Nicolas Jenson’s Venetian imprints of the 1470s and examples of Dutch ‘prototypography’, to Christophe’s Plantin’s prolifically illustrated editions of Monardes’ survey of plants of the New World (1574) and the House of Elzevir’s editions of the Classics and the Greek New Testament (Leiden, 1624).
  • The Age of Exploration: several editions of Theodor de Bry’s America (from 1595 onwards), and Joannes de Laet’s History of the New World (Leiden, 1625), together with surveys, chronicles and illustrated natural histories of Brazil, Peru, Ethiopia, India, Persia and the Portuguese East Indies (in Spanish, Italian, French, Dutch and Latin).
  • Literary works from throughout Europe, including Molière’s L’avare (Paris, 1693), Torquato Tasso’s Gierusalemme liberata (Paris, 1678), Sebastian Brant’s Ship of Fools (Latin edition; Basel, 1498), Juan de Mena’s Las trescientas (Seville, 1499), Joost van Vondel’s Maria Stuart (1647) and Philipp von Zesen’s Adriatische Rosemund (1645).
  • Like its immediate predecessor, Collection 4 contains almost 3 million pages and includes works from the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze (BNCF), the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Wellcome Library and the Kongelige Bibliotek; in addition, Collection 4 sees the first inclusion of volumes (c.1,700) from the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF).

Works from the BnF in Collection 4 include the first Protestant Bible in French (published in Lyon in 1544) as well as editions and translations of the Fathers of the Church, bearing testimony to the importance of the Christian Humanist movement in France, in the wake of Erasmus. A number of works also illuminate the rites and ceremonies of religious life: the celebration of festivals such as Christmas, marriage and funeral rites, practices relating to prayer, fasting, giving alms and processions. Texts of laws and regulations, as well as editions of the customs of the French provinces, jurisprudential treatises on specific matters (such as contract law or feudal law, etc.) and compendia of jurisprudence along with their commentaries also feature. Philosophy is represented by, amongst others, Plato’s Republic and contemporary works such as the Six books of the Republic by Jean Bodin as well as French translations of Italian authors such as Machiavelli and Giovanni Botero (a leading theorist of the ‘raison d’Etat’ at the end of the 16th century).

The contents of Collection 4 as a whole are as wide-ranging as previous collections, including important works of science, art, medicine, travel and popular miscellanies from the Wellcome Library (including many items from William Morris’s personal collection), scholarly works of history and theology from the BNCF, literary translations and legal texts from the Netherlands’ Koninklijke Bibliotheek (including a substantial number of volumes from the Elzevir press), and texts relating to the Reformation from the Kongelige Bibliotek in Copenhagen.

Did you know the library has access to the Digital National Security Archive, as well as many useful online resources?

SPS Library Blog

Have you ever wanted to find out the facts behind the stories that have made world history for yourself? Do international relations and U.S. policy have an influence on your research? The Digital National Security Archive (D.N.S.A.) is a comprehensive database of world events, consisting of glossaries, chronologies, bibliographies, overviews, and photographs. These events have had a considerable effect on world politics, and the way we live our lives today. This vast collection has been gathered and indexed by the leading authorities in their field. D.N.S.A. contains 42 collections, which consist of 103,000 documents, more than 719,000 pages.

The collections include:

  • The United States and the two Koreas, 1969-2010
  • Afghanistan: the making of U.S. policy, 1973-1990
  • Terrorism and U.S. policy, 1968-2002
  • U.S. espionage and intelligence, 1947-1996

You can access this extensive source through the University Library’s eresource page, which also holds many more useful databases and information resources, and is a great…

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Digital philology

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z gateway : Digital philology

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures reveals alternative modes of contact for medieval scholars, librarians and archivists specializing in Middle Ages study and Medieval texts, made possible by the emergence of digital resources and by engagement with the Digital Humanities.

The Journal pushes traditional national and temporal boundaries as the first such publication linking peer-reviewed research and scholarship with the digital libraries of medieval manuscripts such as The Digital Library of Medieval Manuscripts and Parker on the Web. Published twice a year, Digital Philology includes scholarly essays, manuscript studies, and reviews of relevant resources such as websites, digital projects, and books.

Access Digital philology via this link.

Cambridge journal of regions, economy and society

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Cambridge journal of regions, economy and society

Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society publishes multi-disciplinary international research on the spatial dimensions of contemporary socio-economic-political change.  The aim of the Journal is to understand the formative changes and developments associated with the new spatial foundations of today’s globalizing world. It also examines how changes in the global economy are playing out across different spatial scales.

Access Cambridge journal of regions, economy and society via this link.

International relations of the Asia-Pacific

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z gateway : International relations of the Asia-Pacific

International Relations of the Asia-Pacific publishes contributions to our understanding of the dynamics of international politics in Asia and has presented important work on the wider debates in international relations theory from Asian perspectives.

Access International relations of the Asia-Pacific via this link.