Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers

The University Library is delighted to announce members of the University now have full online access to the digital archive Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers.

The archive can be accessed via this link or via the eresources@cambridge index and subject pages or via the LibGuides A-ZTitles in the archive will also be searchable in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z and in iDiscover shortly.

The archive content can be searched alternatively via the new Artemis Primary Sources platform either in isolation or in combination with the other digital archives available from Gale Cengage licensed to the University.  Work is in progress by ProQuest to enable searching of the  full text of the archive content via iDiscover.

The archive comprises digital facsimile images of both full pages and clipped articles for hundreds of 19th century U.S. newspapers and advanced searching capabilities. For each issue, the newspaper is captured from cover-to-cover, providing access to every article, advertisement and illustration.

As compelling as it is comprehensive,  Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers provides access to primary source newspaper content from the 19th century, featuring full-text content and images from numerous newspapers from a range of urban and rural regions throughout the U.S. The collection encompasses the entire 19th century, with an emphasis on such topics as the American Civil War, African-American culture and history, Western migration and Antebellum-era life, among other subjects.

This full-text searchable, facsimile-image database makes experiencing historical events, daily life and 19th-century American culture as easy as clicking a mouse.   Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers provides easy access to seemingly endless information and primary resources — the vast majority of which have never before been accessible online.

CAUCUS! CAUCUS!! CAUCUS!!!

Citizens of North Carolina, awake! An invasion of your liberties is threatened, and as public sentinels, we should be recreant to our trust, did we not promptly sound the tocsin of alarm. There are those at the seat of Government, who are seeking to load the people by chains, by corrupting their government, and bringing them under the surveillance of the Albany Regency.  An insidious and artful attempt has been made by some skulking birds of the night, owl-like beings, who dare not show their faces in open day to their fellow men, to dupe the Legislature of North Carolina – to draw it, by the mere force of a name, into that filthy vortex of political corruption, the caucusing system…

(United States Telegraph (Washington, DC) December 6, 1832, issue 290)

 

Migration to New Worlds

New eresource: Migration to New Worlds

A collection of materials on the ‘Century of Immigration’ is now available via this link.

This collection has been made available to the UK Higher Education community for its relevance to contemporary society and responding to many undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the UK covering the subject of immigration.  This was from an inter-disciplinary point of view and includes the subjects of history, geography, anthropology, sociology, politics, cultural studies and English.

Collection materials include unique primary source material on the ‘Century of Immigration’ (1800-1924): a period when hundreds of thousands of migrants left their homelands in Great Britain, Ireland, mainland Europe, India, China, Japan and other Asian countries to start new lives in the United States, Canada and Australasia.

Materials include unique diaries, personal letters, oral histories and journals; each narrating the intimate journeys and challenges immigrants faced when settling in foreign countries.