Grazer philosophische Studien

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Grazer philosophische Studien: International Journal for Analytic Philosophy

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From the Brill website for the journal:

Grazer Philosophische Studien is a peer reviewed journal that publishes articles on philosophical problems in every area, especially articles related to the analytic tradition. Each year at least two volumes are published, including special issues with invited papers.”

The journal was published as a book series (1 issue per volume) until 2015.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 58 (2000) to present.

Access Grazer Philosophische Studien via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘The Man and the Sea’ by Hartwig HKD on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/ebxEbx

Film Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Film Studies.

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From the Ingenta website for the journal:

Film Studies is a refereed journal that approaches cinema and the moving image from within the fields of critical, conceptual and historical scholarship. The aim is to provide a forum for the interdisciplinary, intercultural and intermedial study of film by publishing innovative research of the highest quality.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 4 (2004) to present.

Access Film Studies via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Cinema’ by Diego David Garcia on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/bufwJZ

Early Modern Women

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Early  Modern Women.

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From the Iter website for the journal:

Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal is the only journal devoted solely to the interdisciplinary and global study of women and gender during the years 1400 to 1700. Each volume gathers essays on early modern women from every country and region, by scholars from a wide range of academic disciplines, including art history, cultural studies, music, history, political science, religion, theatre, history of science, and history of philosophy.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2006) to present.

Access Early Modern Women via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Middle East & Africa Database and Eurasia Atlantic Database

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the Middle East & Africa Database and Eurasia Atlantic Database from the Reference Corporation up to 11 November 2016.

Access to the Middle East & Africa Database is at this link:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://mida.referencecorp.com/

Access to the Eurasia Atlantic Database is at this link:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://eura.referencecorp.com/

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

The Middle East and Africa Database is a bibliographic and fulltext database that provides area coverage (especially for political development, social development, foreign policy, economic development, investment, oil and petrochemicals, trade and technological industries) for the Middle East, North Africa, the Sahel and the Horn of Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Arabs, Iranians, Turks and Africans worldwide, including in Europe and North and South America. The database is designed to provide easy bibliographic and fulltext access to journals, newspapers, conference proceedings, press releases, books, manuals, magazines, and ephemera.

The Eurasia Atlantic Database is a bibliographic and fulltext database that provides intensive area coverage (especially for economic development, investment, trade and technological industries) for Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, and lesser coverage to Western Europe. The database provides unusual historical depth for Soviet and WWII history, including diplomatic/historical documentation such as diplomatic papers and the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials in fulltext. All Reference databases are designed to provide easy bibliographic and fulltext access to journals, newspapers, conference proceedings, press releases, books, manuals, magazines, and ephemera.

The University Library subscribes to the print edition of the Middle East and Africa Database: “Middle East Abstracts and Index“.  The Library is interested in gaining an understanding from this trial of whether this tool is required in print form or online.  Thank you.

 

ABIA: Index of South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the ABIA: Index of South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology up to 15 November 2016.

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: rmr29@cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

ABIA is the only specialist academic in-depth bibliography dedicated to South and Southeast Asian prehistory, archaeology of the historical period, art, crafts and architecture (from early down to contemporary), inscriptions and palaeography, coins and seals of these regions. Going back to 1928, this unique and up-to-date bibliographic reference source has become the standard of reference in the fields it covers for both specialists as well as students.

Misra, Bhaskar Nath. ‘Three Bodhisattva Images from Nalanda’. JUP Hist.S. [The Journal of the UP Historical Society] I (1953 (1955)): 63–75. Brill Bibliographies Online. Web. 18 Oct. 2016.

Popular Medicine

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the Popular Medicine resource until 10 November 2016.

Access the trial here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.popularmedicine.amdigital.co.uk

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

This unique collection showcases the development of ‘popular’ medicine in America during the nineteenth century, through an extensive range of material that was aimed at the general public rather than medical professionals. Explore an array of printed sources, including rare books, pamphlets, trade cards, and visually-rich advertising ephemera.

The collection illustrates the history of ‘popular’ remedies and treatments throughout the nineteenth century, using primary source material from the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  The collection includes; trade cards, ephemera, pamphlets, printed books, posters, admission cards, anatomy guides and street guides.

The material covers key themes including; botanic medicine, the health of women and children, homeopathy, phrenology, electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, sexual health and production and trade.   The increase in advertising by the commercial manufacturers of medical aids, highlights that the intended recipient of these materials was the ‘ordinary man’, rather than medical professionals.  The intention was to encourage him to help himself, and his family, using a vast array of different ‘self-help’ methods and fashionable techniques.

 

 

London Low Life

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the London Low Life collection until 10 November 2016.

Access the trial here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.londonlowlife.amdigital.co.uk

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

London Low Life is a full-text searchable resource, containing colour digital images of rare books, ephemera, maps and other materials relating to 18th, 19th and early 20th century London. It is designed for both teaching and study, from undergraduate to research students and beyond.

In addition to the digital documents, London Low Life contains a wealth of secondary resources, including a chronology, interactive maps, essays, online galleries and links to other useful websites.

This image of the viewing of Harriet Lane’s body is one of many in a Police News Edition pamphlet on the Whitechapel tragedy in 1874.

Church Missionary Society Periodicals

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the Church Missionary Society Periodicals collection until 10 November 2016.

Access the trial here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.churchmissionarysociety.amdigital.co.uk

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

From its roots as an Anglican evangelical movement driven by lay persons, this resource encompasses publications from the CMS, the Church of England Zenana Missionary Society and the latterly integrated South American Missionary Society. Documenting missionary work from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century, the periodicals include news, journals and reports offering a unique perspective on global history and cultural encounters.

 

Shakespeare in Performance

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the Shakespeare in Performance resource until 10 November 2016.

Access the trial here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.shakespeareinperformance.amdigital.co.uk

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

Shakespeare in Performance goes behind the scenes to shine a light on how Shakespeare’s plays have been interpreted by theatre companies, actors and directors across the centuries.

The resource features prompt books from the world-famous collection at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC. These prompt books tell the story of Shakespeare’s plays as they were performed in theatres throughout Great Britain, the United States and internationally, between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries.

Scene from Othello withPaul Robeson:

It took more than a decade after his London performance before Robeson played Othello in the United States in a production directed by Margaret Webster for the Theatre Guild that opened at New York’s Shubert Theatre in 1943. Robeson was the first black actor ever seen as Othello in a major production of the play on a US stage. The production opened to almost ecstatic reviews. According to one critic, Robeson was a majestic presence and made Othello “the great and terrible figure of tragedy which he has so rarely been on the stage.” The production ran for nearly a year, making it at the time the longest running Broadway production of Shakespeare. During the 1944/45 season, it went on tour and became a phenomenon seen by practically half a million people. Along with Robeson, the cast included the husband and wife team of Uta Hagen as Desdemona and José Ferrer as a nimbly evil Iago. The excellent cast and outstanding direction were complemented by the costumes of Robert Edmond Jones, who was one of Broadway’s most acclaimed designers. His expressionistic style was marked by the simplicity of form seen in the striking design for Othello’s robe.

Japan Times Archive

The University of Cambridge has trial access to The Japan Times Archive
up to 13 November 2016.

This trial will be useful for students beyond East Asian studies because the Japan Times is all in English. The digital archives include every issue from 1897 to 2015. It is all full-text searchable. We already have newspaper archives for the Yomiuri Shimbun, Nikkei, and Asahi Shimbun.

For students and scholars who read Japanese, Japan’s major English-language newspaper could be an extra point of comparison. Our existing subscriptions also include English-language editions from Yomiuri and Nikkei. These and other Japan-related e-resources are available together here.

You can reach the Japan Times Archives here

Current Issues are available at the Japan Times site.

Please send your feedback by writing an email to: khw27@cam.ac.uk

From the issue of June 3, 1953: “Made Memorable: The concert last Saturday afternoon at Hibiya Hall … was made especially memorable by the presence of Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt, who spoke the narrative for Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf”. … Even though her reading  was in English the large audience of Japanese children seemed familiar enough with the delightful composition to follow it with ease.  The tiny sprinkling of American children and their parents (why don’t more turn out?) was visibly as moved as I was, not only by the sound of this truly American voice so far from home, but also by the evident enjoyment of over two thousand young Japanese throats singing out “Swanee River” as though it were one of their own folk songs”.

Eleanor Roosevelt in Hiroshima, June 1953.