LGBT Magazine Archive

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the LGBT Magazine Archive via this link:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/lgbtma/index?accountid=9851

This trial will be of interest across different disciplines, and for instance to the current Gender and Sexuality History Workshop.

The trial is active now until 2 March 2019.   We would be glad if you found this trial useful, if you could tell us what you think via the feedback form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

Further details about the LGBT Magazine Archive

The archives of magazines serving LGBT+ communities are of importance for research into LGBT history, often being the principal sources for the documentation of gay cultures, lives, and events.  Researchers consulting these publications may trace the history and evolution of myriad aspects of LGBT history and culture, including legal contexts, health, lifestyle, politics, social attitudes, activism, gay rights, and arts/literature. Despite the value of these publications for research, however, locating the backfiles in print format has been difficult for researchers as they have not typically been collected by libraries.

The archives of 26 leading but previously hard-to-find magazines are included in LGBT Magazine Archive, including many of the longest-running, most influential publications of this type. Crucially, the complete backfile of The Advocate is made available digitally for the first time. The oldest surviving continuously published US title of its type (having launched in 1967), it is the periodical of record for information about the LGBT community; it has charted the key developments in LGBT history and culture for over 50 years. As one of the very few LGBT titles to pre-date the 1969 Stonewall riots, it spans the history of the gay rights movement.

LGBT Magazine Archive also includes the principal UK titles, notably Gay News and its successor publication Gay Times. Launched in 1972 in the aftermath of the partial decriminalization of sex between men in 1967, Gay News became the primary vehicle for news of the growing liberation movement. It also played a key campaigning role, arguing for legal reform in response to matters such as the disparity between the age of consent for homosexuals and for heterosexuals, the hostility of the church, and the medical profession’s pathologization of homosexuality, while also leading pioneering campaigns for equal employment rights. In addition, it celebrated LGBT history and culture and reported new developments in the arts. After ceasing publication in 1983, Gay News was succeeded in 1984 by Gay Times, a monthly magazine which remains the oldest still-published UK LGBT serial. It has offered an eclectic mix of content, spanning news, interviews, features, style, and music / film; it is an exceptional resource, recording more than three decades of gay culture.

Other key publications include The Pink Paper (launched in 1987 and described by human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell as “a major source of news and information” that “was an invaluable forum for debate and helped […] co-ordinate campaigns against homophobia”), Man and Society (first published in 1961, the magazine of the pioneering reforming and counselling organization for sexual minorities, The Albany Trust), and Transgender Tapestry (the most widely-circulated ever serial devoted to transgender issues, launched in 1978).

They are accompanied by some more specialist magazines and newsletters aimed at communities more narrowly defined by movement/orientation (e.g. Albatross – radical feminism), geography (e.g. Gay Scotland), or demography (e.g. Just for Us – children and young adults with LGBT parents), shedding light on their specific experiences.

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