New e-resources in Japanese & Japanese studies

The University Library is delighted to announce the acquisition of the following e-resources to support the study of Japanese and Japanese studies in the University.

All resources are listed in the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

‘Maisaku 毎索’ gives us the archives of the Mainichi shinbun from 1872 to the present. In addition to the regular Japanese newspaper, the database also includes the English-language ‘The Mainichi’ since 2008, the weekly ‘Ekonomisuto’ since 1989, and searchable ‘Yoron chôsa’ from 1945 to 2017. Our subscription allows 2 concurrent users, so please log out when you are done.

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://dbs.g-search.or.jp/WMAI/WMAI_ipcu_login.html

 

‘Zassaku Plus 雑誌記事索引集成データベース’ is a citation database that indexes articles from magazines and journals from the Meiji period onward. It is not a full-text database but rather an aid to finding articles on your topic. It should be a good short-cut to finding out what has been written and where to find it. Please be aware that you may be logged out automatically after 10 minutes of inactivity.

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=http://zassaku-plus.com/

 

‘Kadokawa kogo daijiten 角川古語大辞典’ is a multi-volume dictionary of classical Japanese with about 100,000 main entries plus many examples. Our new subscription allows you to search this via JapanKnowledge. We also have a new link for JapanKnowledge, which should work with Raven instead of the VPN.

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://japanknowledge.com/library/

 

‘Fûzoku gahô 風俗画報’ was an illustrated magazine published 1889 to 1916. It’s now available to be searched in all 518 issues and 41,000 pages with many illustrations. Like the Kadokawa classical dictionary, this is an add-on subscription within JapanKnowledge.

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://japanknowledge.com/library/

New eresource: Open Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL)

New to the LibGuides Databases A-ZOpen Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL)

http://oadtl.org/

The mission of the Open Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL) is to make all open access content in religious studies and related fields discoverable to everyone, everywhere in the world through a single search experience for free forever.

As the initial phase of this mission, the Open Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL) has gleaned high quality content from hundreds of publisher sites, institutional repositories, museums, scholarly societies and public domain collections. The OADTL currently contains about 100,000 OA ebooks and several hundred thousand articles in religious studies. Highlights from the collections contain published books from Brill, de Gruyter, the Society of Biblical Literature and the University of Chicago among others. The collections also contain thousands of Ph.D. and D.Min. dissertations. The collections are growing quickly. The OADTL offers both simple and advanced searching for content. All content is fully cataloged by professional librarians.

The OADTL is proud to be the world’s only fully open access library running OCLC’s WorldShare Management System as its operating system. The searching, discovery and retrieval are truly sophisticated and reliable.

The sponsors of the OADTL are: Claremont School of Theology, Denver Seminary, Evangelical Seminary, Gordon-Conwell Seminary, Hartford Seminary, International Baptist Theological Study Centre (Amsterdam), Lexington Seminary and Singapore Bible College.

New eresource: SAE Mobilus international technical papers 1998-present

The University of Cambridge now has access to the SAE Mobilus international technical papers from 1998 to the present via this link.  Access is available also via Shibboleth login if coming to SAE Mobilus from Google, etc.

SAE Mobilus  is the new platform of the former SAE Digital Library and offers a much improved interface.  The University Departments of Engineering, and Materials Science and Metallurgy will benefit from the the SAE technical papers that have been peer-reviewed by experts in the automotive, aerospace, and commercial vehicle industries .

Users may browse the more than 58,000 technical papers on the latest advances in technical research and applied technical engineering information.   Written by the experts developing solutions and new technologies then peer-reviewed by three specialists to ensure credibility, SAE technical papers foster knowledge, collaboration and the exchange of ideas.

 

RSS feeds now available from Cambridge Core

RSS feeds are now available on Cambridge Core, to alert you to the latest publishing in journals and subjects of your choice.

You can activate the journals feeds from the journals listing page, or from your chosen journal homepage, issue page or article page.  In each case look for the RSS icon, which appears as in the image below. Simply click the icon to sign up to the feed. On the journals listing page the icons are over on the right hand side, corresponding to each journal in the A-Z list. On journals homepages themselves, the icons appear in the image at the top right of the page, next to the existing email alerts icon.

For RSS alerts by subject, choose your subject on the ‘Browse Subjects‘ page, open the subject page and click the same icon at the top right of the page. The subject RSS feeds will alert you when new content is published in both books and journals in your chosen subject.

In all cases, clicking on the icon will open a new tab from where you can sign up for RSS feeds.

If you have any feedback or questions for us about these new feeds, please email us at: corefeedback@cambridge.org

If you’re not familiar with RSS feeds, there is a recently updated explanation here.

Please note that the RSS icon will not appear on journals which are no longer published, even if they have content hosted on Cambrdge Core, as these titles will no longer be providing any new content.

Re-posted from the Cambridge Core blog.

Launching of the digital cartography tool: Mapping the Enlightenment

The research team of the project Mapping the Enlightenment: Intellectual Networks and the Making of Knowledge in the European Periphery  is thrilled to announce the release of an online digital cartography tool which provides historical information about the travels of Greek-speaking scholars during the European Enlightenment Era through a modern interactive environment!

The project Mapping the Enlightenment was funded by the Research Centre for Humanities (RCH) for the academic year 2016-2017. For more information on the project and for using our mapping tool, please visit our webpage:

https://mapping-the-enlightenment.org/

New e-resource: Berliner Philharmoniker Digital Concert Hall

The University of Cambridge now has access to the Berliner Philharmoniker Digital Concert Hall. 

Access to the Concert Hall is via this URL:

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com

A pop-up window will appear which prompts you to register with your email address and password or to log in with an existing account. After registering / logging in, you can view all concerts, films and interviews in the Digital Concert Hall free of charge on all supported devices from the network of your institution or from home.

Each season, around 40 concerts are broadcasted live and they can also be viewed at a later date in the concert archive.  The archive already contains hundreds of recordings with all the great artists of classical music. There are also fascinating documentaries and bonus films.

The University subscription is on the basis of 3 simultaneous users, so please logout (last option in the dropdown list under Settings) when you have finished your session so as not to prevent other users from logging in.

Das Bild zeigt den Innenraum der Hamburger Hauptkirche St. Michaelis (Michel), Author: Je-str

Interior of St. Michael’s Church, Hamburg, where Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s cantata Heilig Wq 217 – which forms the introduction to the concert of Brahms’ German Requiem in the Digital Concert Hall – was first performed.  “This ʻHeiligʼ,” according to the composer, “is an attempt … to attract far greater attention and sensation through ordinary harmonic progressions than any anguished chromaticism is able to achieve. It is my swan song …, and should serve to ensure that after my death I am not too soon forgotten.”–Digital Concert Hall programme notes.

New improved site for the Index of Medieval Art

On 30 March 2018 the Index of medieval art will transition to a new site.  The old URL

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://ica.princeton.edu

will be replaced by the new URL:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=https://theindex.princeton.edu

The new platform promises to be much more user friendly and will include new features such as filtered searching, a date slider, and (mirabile dictu) immediately visible thumbnail images.

Read more about this change here:

https://ima.princeton.edu/2018/02/23/database-switchover-news-and-help-for-researchers/

Triple-faced Janus, detail of stained glass window of the Labors of the Months, Chartres Cathedral, ca. 1220.