New e-resource: American Indian Newspapers

Cambridge University Libraries are delighted to announce the acquisition of the digital archive American Indian Newspapers.

For this new acquisition, we are sincerely grateful to the legacy of Dr. Mark Kaplanoff, Fellow of Pembroke College, whose endowment provides Cambridge with rich and diverse collections to support the study of the history of the United States in the University.

Image of the database from the Adam Matthew platform

From historic pressings to contemporary periodicals, explore nearly 200 years of Indigenous print journalism from the US and Canada. With newspapers representing a huge variety in publisher, audience and era, discover how events were reported by and for Indigenous communities.

American Indian Newspapers aims to present a diverse and robust collection of print journalism from Indigenous peoples of the US and Canada over more than 9,000 individual editions from 1828-2016.

Representing a huge variety in style, production and audience, the newspapers include national periodicals as well as local community news and student publications. The 45 unique titles also include bi-lingual and Indigenous-language editions, such as Hawaiian, Cherokee and Navajo languages.

A link to this database is included in the A-Z Databases Libguide. Records for titles included in this database are available in iDiscover.

Text taken from the Adam Matthews platform

LGBTQ Archives of sexuality & gender

Cambridge University Library is delighted to announce the acquisition of the LGBTQ Archives of Sexuality and Gender. Acquiring the archives has been made possible thanks to funding from the University to support teaching, learning, and research in the history of sex, sexuality, and gender.

Access the LGBTQ Archives of Sexuality and Gender.

The archives offer a significant collection of primary sources for the historical study of sex, sexuality, and gender. With material dating back to the sixteenth century, researchers and scholars can examine how sexual norms have changed over time, health and hygiene, the development of sex education, the rise of sexology, changing gender roles, social movements and activism, erotica, and many other interesting topical areas. This growing archival program offers rich research opportunities across a wide span of human history. Read more about the content of each part of the archives on the following pages:-

We are delighted that Tom English from Gale will be introducing the archives via a webinar on 23 February at 11:00 – 11:45 AM and giving an overview of the material within the series, as well as insight into how to make the most of it through Gale’s powerful research platforms. The webinar will cover content in the archives, including documentation of the social, political, health and legal issues impacting LGBTQ communities around the world, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities.

Location: Online via Zoom here: https://cengage.zoom.us/j/92413464284

Meeting ID: 924 1346 4284

Further promotional materials for librarians and users of the archives are available via the following links:

All videos playlist

Individual video links

Visit the Cambridge University Libraries LGBTQ+ LibGuide for more resources in LGBTQ+ studies.

LGBT databases available until 30th June 2020

The ProQuest LGBT Magazine Archive and the LGBT Thought and Culture database are available to access until 30th June 2020.

Please send your feedback about these resources via the online form.

LGBT Magazine Archive

A searchable archive of major periodicals devoted to LGBT+ interests, dating from the 1950s through to recent years.

The archives of magazines serving LGBT+ communities are of central importance for research into LGBT history, often being the principal sources for the documentation of gay cultures, lives, and events. Researchers consulting these publications may trace the history and evolution of myriad aspects of LGBT history and culture, including legal contexts, health, lifestyle, politics, social attitudes, activism, gay rights, and arts/literature. Despite the value of these publications for research, however, locating the backfiles in print format has been difficult for researchers as they have not typically been collected by libraries.

The archives of 26 leading but previously hard-to-find magazines are included in LGBT Magazine Archive, including many of the longest-running, most influential publications of this type. Crucially, the complete backfile of The Advocate is made available digitally for the first time. The oldest surviving continuously published US title of its type (having launched in 1967), it is the periodical of record for information about the LGBT community; it has charted the key developments in LGBT history and culture for over 50 years. As one of the very few LGBT titles to pre-date the 1969 Stonewall riots, it spans the history of the gay rights movement.

LGBT Thought and Culture

is an online resource hosting books, periodicals, and archival materials documenting LGBT political, social and cultural movements throughout the twentieth century and into the present day. The collection illuminates the lives of lesbians, gays, transgender, and bisexual individuals and the community with content including selections from The National Archives in Kew, materials collected by activist and publisher Tracy Baim from the mid-1980s through the mid-2000s, the Magnus Hirschfeld and Harry Benjamin collections from the Kinsey Institute, periodicals such as En la Vida and BLACKlines, select rare works from notable LGBT publishers including Alyson Books and Cleis Press, as well as mainstream trade and university publishers.

Photo by Rosemary Ketchum from Pexels

Text from the ProQuest and Alexander Street Press platforms

British Archives Online : trial extended until 30th June 2020

British Archives Online have generously been made accessible to the University of Cambridge by Microform Academic Publishers until 30th June 2020.

Please send us your feedback about this, and any of our other trials, via the online form.

British Online Archives is one of the United Kingdom’s leading academic publishers.

The richness and diversity of BAO’s 89 collections (currently and growing) both for the study of British and global history is staggering and will provide an online library of great value to researchers at Cambridge.

The Archive hosts over 3 million records drawn from both private and public archives. These records are organised thematically, covering 1,000 years of world history, from politics and warfare to slavery and medicine.

Whether you’re an individual interested in your family’s history, a librarian looking for ways to adapt in the digital age, or a professor in search of innovative teaching tools, we have something to meet your needs.

Newsbank databases : available until 30th June 2020

A number of newspaper databases have been made available on the Newsbank (Readex) platform for access until 30th June 2020.

Please send your feedback about these eresources via the form.

Collections included in our access are:

Evans Digital Edition (Web)

  • Books, pamphlets, and broadsides published during the 17th and 18th centuries
  • From the bibliography by Charles Evans and Roger Bristol’s Supplement
  • Published in cooperation with the American Antiquarian Society

Shaw-Shoemaker Digital Edition (Web)

  • Books, pamphlets, and broadsides published during the early 19th century
  • From the bibliography by Ralph R. Shaw and Richard H. Shoemaker
  • Published in cooperation with the American Antiquarian Society

Rand Daily Mail, 1902-1985

Quintessential reporting on South Africa from the Boer Wars to the apartheid era

African Newspapers: The British Library Collection

More than 60 African historical newspapers from the nineteenth century

African Newspapers, 1800-1922

African Newspapers, Series II, 1835-1925

Explore African History and Culture during the 19th and 20th Centuries

South Asian Newspapers, 1864-1922

Historical Newspapers from South Asia
Explore South Asian History and Culture during the 19th and 20th Centuries

Latin American Newspapers (Series I)

Latin American Newspapers (Series II)

Historical Newspapers from Latin America
Explore Latin American History and Culture during the 19th and 20th Centuries

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Digital Collection All Regions, 1941-1996

  • An archive of 20th Century news from around the world
  • Global views on United States foreign and domestic policy after World War II
  • Covers the Cold War, China, the Middle East, Latin America, the Soviet Union, and more

Immigrations, Migrations and Refugees, 1941-1996

Translated and English-language radio and television broadcasts, newspapers, periodicals, government documents and books providing global insight on immigration in the mid-to-late 20th century

Pravda Archive: Global Perspectives, 1959-1996

Articles published by Pravda during the Cold War and the years immediately following, from 1959 to 1996, collected and translated into English by the CIA

History Vault (ProQuest) : access to 31 May 2020

American history of the 19th and 20th century at your fingertips in millions of primary sources from ProQuest History Vault accessible to end May 2020

ProQuest History Vault unlocks the wealth of key archival materials with a single search. Researchers can access digitized letters, papers, photographs, scrapbooks, financial records, diaries, and many more primary source materials taken from the University Publications of America (UPA) Collections.

Access for Cambridge is enabled via this link

ProQuest History Vault

Please use your feedback form to tell how these archives have been useful to you.  Thank you.

Get help on using the History Vault from the History Vault LibGuide.

ProQuest History Vault first launched in 2011 and consists of manuscript and archival collections digitized in partnership and from a wide variety of archival institutions. Major collection areas in History Vault focus on the Black Freedom Movement of the 20th Century, Southern Life and Slavery, Women’s Rights, International Relations, American Politics and Society with a strong focus on the 20th Century, and labor unions, workers and radical politics in the 20th Century. On the topic of civil rights and Black Freedom, History Vault contains records of four of the most important civil rights organizations of the 1950s and 1960s: NAACP, SCLC, SNCC, and CORE.

History Vault’s collections on Slavery and Southern plantations candidly document the realities of slavery at the most immediate grassroots level in Southern society and provide some of the most revealing documentation in existence on the functioning of the slave system. Many of the collections in History Vault were originally available in microfilm from the University Publications of America (UPA) research collections and others come from the University Microfilms International (UMI) research collections with additional collections scanned from the original documents.

Horses in landscape, Franz Marc whose works are recorded in the collection Nazi Looted Art and Assets : Records on the Post-World War II Restitution Process 1942-1998

 

The Brexit Collection at LSE

The London School of Economics has made a collection of campaigning leaflets from the 1975 and 2016 referendums on the UK’s membership of the common market and EU available online. 

The collection can be browsed by referendum year, affiliation, organisation and subject. There are almost 40 leaflets for the 1975 referendum and over 180 from 2016.

For the 1975 referendum they say:

“After Charles de Gaulle famously vetoed the UK’s decision to join the European Communities (EC), the UK finally became a member in 1973. By 1975 the first ever UK-wide referendum took place, where the electorate were asked “Do you think the United Kingdom should stay in the European Community (the common market)?” with 67% of the voting electorate answering “yes” and 33% “no”.”

The collection is part of a wider archive of documents looking at Britain and the European Union.

 

The images are not copyright free and are made available for research only.

This collection is not available to search in iDiscover and should be accessed on the LSE website.

Immigrations, Migrations and Refugees: Global Perspectives, 1941-1996: trial access

The University of Cambridge has trial access to the digital archive Immigrations, Migrations and Refugees: Global Perspectives, 1941-1996 here:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=http://infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/readex/welcome?p=TOPIMM

Access is available from 1 to 31 March 2019.

Please send your feedback on this trial using this online form.  Thank you.

From the beginning of World War II through the end of the twentieth century, the mass movement of peoples caused problems for governments around the world. Responses to legal immigration, illegal immigration, and refugee crises varied greatly, often depending on a country’s proximity to the crisis. These problems and responses helped shape the world we live in.

What is the context of this database?

This database contains news reports, television transcripts, and radio transcripts from around the world. The reports were chosen by a U.S. government agency called the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS)—which became part of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in 1947–to be disseminated among government officials and decision makers. The reports begin with the refugee flows during World War II and cover all crises through 1996. The reports come from many nations and, where necessary, were translated into English. No U.S. newspapers or broadcasts are included in this database.

Armenian refugees from Turkey carding wool in Tiflis, Georgia. Photograph by Melville Chater from the National Geographic Magazine, 1920.

CIA CREST Library

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) of the United States of America is required to declassify all records after a period of 25 years. These documents have been made available online in the CREST archive. 

Over 12 million pages have been made available as full text in electronic format. It has only been possible to view these records online from January 2017, previously access was only available on site the National Archives in Maryland.

The CREST collection covers a myriad of topics, such as the early CIA history, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Berlin Tunnel project, the Korean War, and the U-2 reconnaissance aircraft. The documents also extensively address developments on terrorism, as well as worldwide military and economic issues.

The CREST Archive is freely accessible and can be used by anyone.

For a more detailed search you may want to use the U.S. Declassified Documents Online (USDDO) database by Gale. USDDO offers access to over 600,000 pages of primary source information from presidential libraries, the Department of State, Department of Defense, CIA, FBI, United Nations, and National Security Council, amongst others. The documents cover the period 1900-2008.

U.S. Declassified Documents Online’s greatest value lies in the wealth of facts and insights that it provides in connection with the political, economic, and social conditions of the domestic U.S. and foreign countries. Materials as diverse as State
Department political analyses, White House confidential file materials, National Security Council policy statements, CIA intelligence memoranda, and much more offer unique insights into the inner workings of the U.S. government and world events in the twentieth and twenty-first century.

A modern interface allows researchers in foreign policy, public policy, international law and security, modern history, area studies, journalism, and more to easily locate and analyse records from numerous agencies and libraries

USDDO is provided by subscription and requires a Raven login for off-campus access.

Twentieth Century China

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Twentieth Century China.

From the Project Muse website for the journal:

Twentieth-Century China, a refereed scholarly journal, publishes new research on China’s long twentieth century. Articles in the journal engage significant historiographic or interpretive issues and explore both continuities of the Chinese experience across the century and specific phenomena and activities within the Chinese cultural, political, and territorial sphere—including the Chinese diaspora—since the final decades of the Qing. Comparative empirical and/or theoretical studies rooted in Chinese experience sometimes extend to areas outside China, as well. The journal encompasses a wide range of historical approaches in its examination of twentieth-century China: among others, social, cultural, intellectual, political, economic, and environmental. Founded as a newsletter in 1975, Twentieth-Century China has grown into one of the leading English-language journals in the field of Chinese history.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from the Project Muse platform from volume 33 (2007) to present.

Access Twentieth Century China via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.