JSTOR collections available until 30th June 2023 (Lives of Literature, Security Studies, Sustainability Arts & Sciences XV)

Our access to the JSTOR collections that have been made available during the Covid-19 pandemic will continue until 30th June 2023.

All of our JSTOR databases are listed in the A-Z Databases.

Please send your feedback about these collections via the online form.

Arts & Sciences Collection XV

Collection XV has been added to our library in addition to collections I to XIV that are already available to us. A title list for this collection is available here. Now, when you search the JSTOR platform, you will have full text access to all of the collections.

Lives of Literature

JSTOR Lives of Literature is a collection of academic journals devoted to the deep study of writers and texts associated with core literary movements. Key topics include: Medieval Authors & Texts; Modernist Authors; Victorian, Edwardian & Gothic Authors; and Literary Theorists.

A complete title list is available to view here.

Security Studies

Explore a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of security studies. This content looks at security studies through a broad lens, encompassing research on international security and peace and conflict studies from all corners of the globe.

Sustainability

Discover a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of sustainability. The subjects of resilience and sustainability are explored broadly, covering research on environmental stresses and their impact on society.

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile from Pexels

Photo by Pixabay: https://www.pexels.com/photo/alternative-energy-blade-blue-clouds-414928/

New E-Resource – Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers

We are very pleased to announce that the Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers (Premium Collection) is now available to Cambridge University members.

The Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers collection includes publications from the countries of the Middle East and North Africa. It provides unique insights into the history of individual countries across this dynamic region, as well as broad viewpoints on key historic events from the late nineteenth century through the present.

Researchers will find a wealth of unique content from the Middle East and North Africa, much of which has never been digitized or available as open access material. Content in this collection is predominantly in Arabic, but also includes key titles in English and French. Subscribing institutions also receive access to five in-copyright titles from the region: al-Akhbār (الاخبار, Lebanon, 2006-2019), al-Dustūr (الدستور, Jordan, 1967-2000), al-Jumhūrīyah (الجمهورية, Egypt, 1962-1986), al-Riyāḍ (الرياض, Saudi Arabia, 1972-1996), and Filasṭīn (فلسطين, Israel/Palestine, 1956-1967).

This collection is also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

The Global Press Archive Charter Alliance – Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers collection (Open Access)

Researchers will find a wealth of unique content from the Middle East and North Africa, much of which has never been digitized or available as open access material. Content in the Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers collection is predominantly in Arabic, but also includes key titles in English and French. The collection comprises mostly out-of-copyright, orphaned content. CRL members and subscribing institutions also receive access to five in-copyright titles from the region: al-Akhbār (الاخبار, Lebanon, 2006-2019), al-Dustūr (الدستور, Jordan, 1967-2000), al-Jumhūrīyah (الجمهورية, Egypt, 1962-1986), al-Riyāḍ (الرياض, Saudi Arabia, 1972-1996), and Filasṭīn (فلسطين, Israel/Palestine, 1956-1967).

From the Ottoman Empire to the Arab Spring, the countries of the Middle East and North Africa have stood at the crossroads of history. The Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers collection includes publications from across this dynamic region, providing unique insights into the history of individual countries, as well as broad viewpoints on key historic events from the late nineteenth century through the present.

Open Access to this collection is made possible through the generous support of the Center for Research Libraries and its member institutions.

Text from the East View platform for the collection.

New E-Resource : African Diaspora, 1860-Present

We are pleased to announce the acquisition of the  African Diaspora, 1860-Present database on the Alexander Street Press platform.

Essential for understanding Black history and culture, African Diaspora, 1860-Present allows scholars to discover the migrations, communities, and ideologies of the African Diaspora through the voices of people of African descent. With a focus on communities in the Caribbean, Brazil, India, United Kingdom, and France, the collection includes never-before digitized primary source documents, including personal papers, organizational papers, journals, newsletters, court documents, letters, and ephemera form.

After the abolition of slavery, African diasporic communities formed throughout the world. The circumstances and histories of the establishment of each community were quite different, and as a result, the experiences, cultures and ideologies of the members of these communities vary significantly.

African Diaspora, 1860-present brings these communities to life through never-before digitized primary source documents, secondary sources and videos from around the world with a focus on communities in the Caribbean, Brazil, India, United Kingdom, and France. With content from key partners like The National Archives and Records Administration (US), National Archives at Kew (UK), Royal Anthropological Institute, and Senate House Library (University of London), this first release of African Diaspora, 1860-Present offers an unparalleled view into the experiences and contributions of individuals in the Diaspora, as told through their own accounts. Future releases will include further insights into African diasporic communities with the papers of C.L.R. James, the writings of George Padmore and many more sources.

Major themes include:

  • Migrations of people of African descent to countries around the world, from the 19th century to present day.
  • Diasporic communities including Afro-Brazilian communities in Rio de Janeiro, Black British communities in London, Sidi communities in India, Afro-Caribbean communities in Trinidad, Haiti, and Cuba.
  • Movements and ideologies, including the Back to Africa movement and the Pan-African movement.

Text taken from the Alexander Street Press platform

Photo by Magda Ehlers on Pexels

Also available to access via iDiscover and the Databases A-Z .

african diaspora-1

JSTOR collections available until 30th June 2022 (Lives of Literature, Security Studies, Sustainability Arts & Sciences XV)

We have access to 4 further JSTOR collections until 30th June 2022.

Please send your feedback about these collections via the online form.

Lives of Literature

JSTOR Lives of Literature is a collection of academic journals devoted to the deep study of writers and texts associated with core literary movements. Key topics include: Medieval Authors & Texts; Modernist Authors; Victorian, Edwardian & Gothic Authors; and Literary Theorists.

A complete title list is available to view here.

Security Studies

Explore a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of security studies. This content looks at security studies through a broad lens, encompassing research on international security and peace and conflict studies from all corners of the globe.

Sustainability

Discover a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of sustainability. The subjects of resilience and sustainability are explored broadly, covering research on environmental stresses and their impact on society.

Arts & Sciences Collection XV

Collection XV has been added to our library in addition to collections I to XIV that are already available to us. A title list for this collection is available here. Now, when you search the JSTOR platform, you will have full text access to all of the collections.

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile from Pexels

Photo ’15’ by Duncan C from Flickr.

New eresources: African newspapers collections

Access to four Readex newspaper archives are now available to members of the University of Cambridge. Acquisition of the archives has been made possible thanks to funding from the University to support teaching, learning, and research in African Studies.

The new archives available from Readex are:

African Newspapers 1, 1800-1922

This groundbreaking online collection provides more than 60 searchable African newspapers published in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Featuring English- and foreign-language titles from Angola, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe, African Newspapers offers unparalleled coverage of the issues and events that shaped the continent and its peoples between 1800 and 1922.

African Newspapers 2, 1835-1925

Expanding the coverage found in the inaugural edition of African Newspapers, this second series delivers 40 additional African newspapers published between 1835 and 1925. Featuring English- and foreign-language titles from Algeria, Angola, Liberia, Madagascar, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda, African Newspapers, Series 2, offers deep and unique coverage of the issues and events that shaped the continent and its peoples during this period of major change.

African Newspapers: The British Library Collection

African Newspapers: The British Library Collection features nearly 60 newspapers from across the African continent, all published before 1900. Originally archived by the British Library these rare historical documents are now available for the first time in a fully searchable online collection. From culture to history to geopolitics, the pages of these newspapers offer fresh research opportunities for students and scholars interested in topics related to Africa.

Among the many rare and essential in this series are the Egyptian Gazette (Cairo), Journal Franco-Ethiopien (Djibouti); Central African Times (Blantyre, Malawi), Commercial Gazette (Port Louis, Mauritius), Times of Marocco (Morocco), St. Helena Guardian (Jamestown, St. Helena) and Express en Oranjevrijstaatsch Advertentieblad (Bloemfontein, South Africa).

Rand Daily Mail, Johannesburg, SA (1902-1985)

The Rand Daily Mail, published daily in Johannesburg, is a critically important title that pioneered popular journalism in South Africa.

The Rand Daily Mail is of great value to students and scholars, opening exciting new pathways to research a turbulent period in history. Its archives are rich with insight into events related to South Africa’s struggle for freedom and democracy, covered in fascinating detail by a group of daring and talented journalists. Examples include Benjamin Pogrund’s extraordinary coverage of the Sharpeville massacre in 1960; Helen Zille’s uncovering of Steve Biko’s murder at the hands of police in 1977 investigative reporting by Mervyn Rees and Chris Day about the Department of Information’s effort to influence opinion, an exposé that sparked the scandal known as “Muldergate”; and many others. Rand Daily Mailcontinued to be popular among progressive readers until—after adopting an outspoken anti-apartheid stance amid a massive clampdown by security forces—it was controversially closed in 1985.

Records will be made available in iDiscover for titles in this collections.

Text taken from the Readex platform.

Image credit Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

New eresource: Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice, 1490-2007

Access to the Adam Matthew Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice, 1490-2007 database is now available to members of the University of Cambridge. The acquisition of the database has been made possible thanks to funding from the University to support teaching, learning, and research in African Studies.

An essential resource for the study of slavery, the African American experience and world history spanning over five centuries.

Designed for teaching and research, this resource brings together documents and collections from libraries and archives across the Atlantic world, covering an extensive time period from 1490. Topics covered include the varieties of slavery, the legacy of slavery, the social justice perspective and the continued existence of slavery today.

The resource offers in-depth case studies in America, the Caribbean, Brazil and Cuba along with important material examining European, Islamic and African involvement in the slave trade.

Highlights

  • African forts and the Gold Coast
  • Brazil
  • Education and Social Justice
  • The Day Law in Kentucky
  • Family Papers, Correspondence, Bills and Plantation Journals from the Louisianna State University
  • Local court records relating to slavery for both Georgia and North Carolina
  • Resistance and Revolts
  • Slave cases decided in the Supreme Courts of Georgia and North Carolina
  • Slave testimony
  • Slavery in the Early Americas
  • Songs that recall the Transatlantic Slave Experience
  • Urban Slavery in New York and Philadelphia
  • The Underground Railroad in Pennsylvannia
  • Zanzibar and the Indian Ocean Slave Trade

British Online Archives – trial access added to supplement our new collections extended to 31st March

Cambridge University has acquired new collections of digitized archives from British Archives Online (BOA), details of these collections can be found at near the end of this post.

As part of their response to COVID-19, British Online Archives (BOA) has provided additional free access to their entire database of digital primary resources until 31st March to supplement our new acquisitions.

Their website hosts over 4 million records drawn from both private and public archives. These records are organised thematically, covering 1,000 years of world history, and are of use to undergraduate students and experienced academics alike.

Themes include:

Acquired Collections

The following digital archives have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

The 8 digital archives can be found on this page or separately via the links with collection level descriptions below.

Antigua, slavery and emancipation in the records of a sugar plantation 1689-1907

Apartheid through the eyes of South African Political Parties 1948-1994

Caribbean colonial statistics from the British Empire, 1824-1950

Colonial Africa in official statistics 1821-1953

India, Uprising and Reform 1879-1910 in the records of the Governor-General

Indian Communists and Trade Unionists: the Meerut Conspiracy 1929-1933

Slavery, Advocacy and Opposition 1675-1865

World News in Indian newspapers 1782-1908

Image credits:

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

‘Clare College Cambridge’ by Mark Seton on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/KtYydf

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

British Online Archives – trial access added to supplement our new collections

Cambridge University has acquired new collections of digitized archives from British Archives Online (BOA), details of these collections can be found at near the end of this post.

As part of their response to COVID-19, British Online Archives (BOA) has provided additional free access to their entire database of digital primary resources for 30 days from 1st February to supplement our new acquisitions.

Their website hosts over 4 million records drawn from both private and public archives. These records are organised thematically, covering 1,000 years of world history, and are of use to undergraduate students and experienced academics alike.

Themes include:

Acquired Collections

The following digital archives have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

The 8 digital archives can be found on this page or separately via the links with collection level descriptions below.

Antigua, slavery and emancipation in the records of a sugar plantation 1689-1907

Apartheid through the eyes of South African Political Parties 1948-1994

Caribbean colonial statistics from the British Empire, 1824-1950

Colonial Africa in official statistics 1821-1953

India, Uprising and Reform 1879-1910 in the records of the Governor-General

Indian Communists and Trade Unionists: the Meerut Conspiracy 1929-1933

Slavery, Advocacy and Opposition 1675-1865

World News in Indian newspapers 1782-1908

Image credits:

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

‘Clare College Cambridge’ by Mark Seton on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/KtYydf

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

New e-resources: Oxford Research Encyclopedias

Authored by the experts, Oxford Research Encylcopedia articles deliver in-depth thinking & analysis of a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, and on emerging themes in the sciences.

The Oxford Research Encyclopedias (OREs) offer long-form overview articles written, peer-reviewed, and edited by leading scholars. Cambridge University members now have access online to all the OREs published.

The OREs cover both foundational and cutting-edge topics in order to develop, over time, an anchoring knowledge base for major areas of research across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.

Cambridge University now has access to all the OREs which currently comprise the following subjects: African history; American history; Anthropology; Asian history; Business & Management; Climate science; Communication; Criminology and Criminal justice; Economics and finance; Education; Social work; Environmental science; Global public health; International studies; Latin American history; Linguistics; Literature; Natural hazard science; Neuroscience; Physics; Planetary science; Politics; Psychology; Religion.

These online encyclopaedias have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.