JSTOR collections available until 30th June 2023 (Lives of Literature, Security Studies, Sustainability Arts & Sciences XV)

Our access to the JSTOR collections that have been made available during the Covid-19 pandemic will continue until 30th June 2023.

All of our JSTOR databases are listed in the A-Z Databases.

Please send your feedback about these collections via the online form.

Arts & Sciences Collection XV

Collection XV has been added to our library in addition to collections I to XIV that are already available to us. A title list for this collection is available here. Now, when you search the JSTOR platform, you will have full text access to all of the collections.

Lives of Literature

JSTOR Lives of Literature is a collection of academic journals devoted to the deep study of writers and texts associated with core literary movements. Key topics include: Medieval Authors & Texts; Modernist Authors; Victorian, Edwardian & Gothic Authors; and Literary Theorists.

A complete title list is available to view here.

Security Studies

Explore a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of security studies. This content looks at security studies through a broad lens, encompassing research on international security and peace and conflict studies from all corners of the globe.

Sustainability

Discover a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of sustainability. The subjects of resilience and sustainability are explored broadly, covering research on environmental stresses and their impact on society.

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile from Pexels

Photo by Pixabay: https://www.pexels.com/photo/alternative-energy-blade-blue-clouds-414928/

New E-Resource – Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Archive

The Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Archive is now available to access for members of the University of Cambridge.

Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) was founded in 1830. The learned Society promotes the advancement of geographical science in all its aspects. The Society’s archive contains vast collections of documents, maps, photographs, expedition reports, manuscript materials and books, and span 500 years of geography, travel and exploration. The RGS holds one of the largest private map collections in the world. It includes one million sheets of maps and charts, 3000 atlases, 40 globes (as gores or mounted on stands) and 1000 gazetteers. The earliest printed cartographic item dates back to 1485.

The Wiley Digital Archives-RGS collection also boasts over one hundred unique special collections. These include the Everest Collection; the David Livingstone Collection; the Sir Ernest Shackleton Collection; the Stanley Collection; the Younghusband Collection; the Speke Collection; and the Gertrude Bell Collection.

Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Archive is also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Text from the Wiley platform for the database.

Photo by Frans van Heerden: https://www.pexels.com/photo/gray-stone-mountain-beside-body-of-water-868990/

 

 

New e-resources: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Anthropology

We are pleased to announce that Cambridge University now have access to the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Anthropology via this direct link.

Authored by the experts, Oxford Research Encylcopedia articles deliver in-depth thinking and analysis of a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, and on emerging themes in the sciences.

Hunter-Gatherer, Farmer interactions in Uganda

Hunter-Gatherer, Farmer Interactions in Uganda“The coexistence of the Kansyore-Later Stone Age (LSA) hunter-gatherer and the Early Iron Age (EIA)-Urewe-farmer cultural materials in the same cultural deposits and environmental space can no longer be dismissed as accidental admixture. At Kansyore Island in western Uganda, it is clear that the Kansyore hunter-gatherer and Urewe-farmers are two cultural periods presumed to be widely separated in time and space but that coexist together in the same stratigraphic contexts suggesting interaction and coexistence. …” – By Elizabeth Kyazike

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

JSTOR collections available until 30th June 2022 (Lives of Literature, Security Studies, Sustainability Arts & Sciences XV)

We have access to 4 further JSTOR collections until 30th June 2022.

Please send your feedback about these collections via the online form.

Lives of Literature

JSTOR Lives of Literature is a collection of academic journals devoted to the deep study of writers and texts associated with core literary movements. Key topics include: Medieval Authors & Texts; Modernist Authors; Victorian, Edwardian & Gothic Authors; and Literary Theorists.

A complete title list is available to view here.

Security Studies

Explore a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of security studies. This content looks at security studies through a broad lens, encompassing research on international security and peace and conflict studies from all corners of the globe.

Sustainability

Discover a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of sustainability. The subjects of resilience and sustainability are explored broadly, covering research on environmental stresses and their impact on society.

Arts & Sciences Collection XV

Collection XV has been added to our library in addition to collections I to XIV that are already available to us. A title list for this collection is available here. Now, when you search the JSTOR platform, you will have full text access to all of the collections.

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile from Pexels

Photo ’15’ by Duncan C from Flickr.

Royal Geographical Society & Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland digital archives : access until 16 March 2021

In addition to the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS) digital archive access, Cambridge University members have temporary access to the Royal Geographical Society and Royal Anthropological Institute digital archives via the Wiley Online Archives platform.

Access is available until 16th March 2021.

Please send your feedback via the online form.

Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) archive

Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) was founded in 1830. The learned Society promotes the advancement of geographical science in all its aspects. The Society’s archive contains vast collections of documents, maps, photographs, expedition reports, manuscript materials and books, and span 500 years of geography, travel and exploration. The RGS holds one of the largest private map collections in the world. It includes one million sheets of maps and charts, 3000 atlases, 40 globes (as gores or mounted on stands) and 1000 gazetteers. The earliest printed cartographic item dates back to 1485.

The Archive includes Maps, Atlases, Charts and Plans; Expedition Reports; Fieldnotes, Correspondence and Diaries; Grey Literature; Photographs, Artwork and Illustrations; Journal Manuscripts; Photographs; Proceedings, Lectures, and Ephemera. The collection spans a wide variety of interdisciplinary research areas, and supports educational needs in Anthropology, Area Studies; Cartography and Visualizations, Colonial, Post-Colonial & Decolonisation Studies; Development Studies; Environmental Degradation; Historical & Cultural Geography; Historical Sociology; Human Geography; Identity, Gender & Ethnic Studies; Geology; International Relations; Trade and Commerce, and Law and Policy relating to Colonization.

Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland archive

The Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (RAI) is the world’s longest-established scholarly association dedicated to the furtherance of anthropology (the study of humankind) in its broadest and most inclusive sense.

This archive includes maps, photographs and manuscripts.

New e-resources: Oxford Research Encyclopedias

Authored by the experts, Oxford Research Encylcopedia articles deliver in-depth thinking & analysis of a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, and on emerging themes in the sciences.

The Oxford Research Encyclopedias (OREs) offer long-form overview articles written, peer-reviewed, and edited by leading scholars. Cambridge University members now have access online to all the OREs published.

The OREs cover both foundational and cutting-edge topics in order to develop, over time, an anchoring knowledge base for major areas of research across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.

Cambridge University now has access to all the OREs which currently comprise the following subjects: African history; American history; Anthropology; Asian history; Business & Management; Climate science; Communication; Criminology and Criminal justice; Economics and finance; Education; Social work; Environmental science; Global public health; International studies; Latin American history; Linguistics; Literature; Natural hazard science; Neuroscience; Physics; Planetary science; Politics; Psychology; Religion.

These online encyclopaedias have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

New e-resource: Anthropology Resource Library

Cambridge anthropology is now supported by online access to the collections of the Anthropology Resource Library, including sound and video archives and digital transcripts of ethnographic fieldwork studies

Cambridge University now has access to the full wealth and range of the Anthropology Resource Library from ProQuest. The online library comprises the largest collection of ethnographic video documentaries and primary footage—over 1,500 hours, with many rare and exclusive titles from independent production companies and researchers.

The library also includes 2,000 historic field recordings from around the world, alongside their supporting field notes and ethnographers’ metadata, opening new paths for the study of music in its cultural context; 250,000 audio recordings from a wide range of labels including Smithsonian Folkways Recordings; rare and previously unpublished field research from partners such as the Royal Anthropological Institute, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, and university archives such as the London School of Economics and Vassar College. The Anthropology Resource Library can be accessed via this link or you can go directly to the individual collections:

Anthropological Fieldwork Online

This fully indexed, primary-source database unfolds the historical development of anthropology from a global perspective—with archival collections from North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific — including key field notebooks, images, and recordings of the early- to mid-20th century. The collection brings together the work of scholars who shaped the theories and methods students learn about, critique, and reshape in their own fieldwork endeavors today. Content is focused around each scholar’s prominent expedition field experience, with comprehensive inclusion of fieldwork, contextualizing documents from the same time period, including correspondence, and subsequent writings that led to major publications, such as draft manuscripts, lectures, and articles. Users will see the full qualitative scholarly process unfold in all its iterations, from data gathering in the field to later analysis, early writings, and final publication

Anthropology Online

Anthropology Online brings together a wide range of written ethnographies, seminal texts, memoirs, and contemporary studies, covering human culture and behavior the world over. The collection contains the published versions of the research aggregated in Anthropological Fieldwork Online, making this database a perfect companion piece. When used together, the two collections present firsthand insight into the process that transforms field notes into finished manuscripts. The collection is a comprehensive resource for the study of social and cultural life throughout the 20th century, providing the works of such key practitioners and theorists as Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, Claude Levi-Strauss, Clifford Geertz, Max Gluckman, David MacDougall, Paul Rabinow, E. E. Evans- Pritchard, Robert Borofsky, and more

Ethnographic video online

Ethnographic Video Online contains documentaries, shorts, and ethnographies from every continent and hundreds of cultures, and include films from the most significant names in visual anthropology, such as the Royal Anthropological Institute (RAI) ethnographic film library, and many independent producers and distributors previously unavailable outside their regions. With footage from the early days of film in the field, contemporary counterpoints, and the classic titles, these films provide core visual materials for anthropology courses at all levels. Explore growing areas of study such as environmental anthropology, medical anthropology, and language preservation

Ethnographic sound archives online

Ethnographic Sound Archives Online is an initiative to digitize and make available previously unpublished field recordings that underpin the history of ethnomusicology and that represent research around the world. Curated to integrate field recordings with their contextualizing field notes and supporting field materials, the collection opens new paths for analyzing, interrogating, and connecting historic primary sources in context. Music is tightly woven into society and culture — it accompanies rituals and dances, and fills social spaces. It is the goal of the ethnomusicologist to document sound in this broader context, so field recordings are often accompanied by film footage, photographs, handwritten notes, and records of the larger soundscape. Where possible, the audio in this collection is presented along with its contextual materials, totaling more than 10,000 pages of field notes and 150 hours of film footage, recreating music’s relationship to its cultural context in a digital space

These new online collections have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

Find more resources in anthropology and get expert support from librarians, visit the Anthropology & Archaeology LibGuide.

New e-resource: World Heritage Sites: Africa

Key online e-resource to support African studies, and related interdisciplinary studies: World Heritage Sites: Africa

Cambridge University now has access to World Heritage Sites Africa, a versatile collection of more than 86,000 objects of visual, contextual, and spatial documentation of African heritage and rock art sites.

This collection aids researchers in African studies, anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art history, geography, history, and literature, as well as those focused on geomatics, historic preservation, urban planning, and visual and spatial technologies.

It is a comprehensive tool for museums, libraries, NGOs, and government organizations engaged in the conservation and management of cultural heritage sites. World Heritage Sites: Africa offers more than 86,000 objects in 30 sub-collections, providing visual, contextual, and spatial documentation of African heritage sites.

This new digital archive has been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

See for more information on African studies resources, the African Studies Library LibGuide.

New e-resource: Struggles for Freedom: Southern Africa

Key online e-resource to support African studies, and related interdisciplinary studies: World Heritage Sites: Africa

Cambridge University now has access to Struggles for Freedom: Southern Africa.

The liberation of Southern Africa and the dismantling of the Apartheid regime was a major political development in the 20th century. This collection focuses on the complex and varied liberation struggles in the region, with an emphasis on Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.

Struggles for Freedom: Southern Africa is a multifaceted resource for institutions supporting teaching and research in African studies, anthropology, art and art history, ethnicity and race relations, gender studies, history, international studies, language and literature, law, political science, and sociology.

This collection consists of 76 sub-collections of primary source materials focusing on colonial rule, the dispersion of exiles, and international intervention, and it comes from archives and libraries around the world, including: Periodicals, pamphlets, and local newspaper reports; Nationalist publications; Records of colonial government commissions; UN documents; Personal papers and correspondence; Out-of-print and other relevant books; Photographs; Speeches and interviews

This new digital archive has been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

See for more information on African studies resources, the African Studies Library LibGuide.

Anthropology Resource Centre : access until 2nd December 2020

University of Cambridge members now have access to Anthropology Resource Centre until 2nd December 2020.

Please send your feedback about any of these eresources using the online form.

The Alexander Street Anthropology collections offer comprehensive, multimedia resources for the study of anthropology, including the largest collection of ethnographic videos and previously unpublished archival field materials. Content is presented on a multimedia platform that reflects the integrated methods of field research, through linking and cross-searchability of text, audiovisual and archival primary sources. Our resources work in tandem to bring the fieldwork process to life by juxtaposing original fieldwork with subsequent published ethnographies, as well as follow up studies and visual ethnographies that span a century.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Text taken from the Alexander Street platform.