Journal of Resistance Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Resistance Studies

From the  website for the journal:

Journal of Resistance Studies is a new international, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed scientific journal that explores unarmed resistance. The articles we want to publish focus on critical understandings of resistance strategies, discourses, tactics, effects, causes, contexts and experiences. Our aim is to advance an understanding of how resistance might undermine repression, injustices and domination of any kind, as well as how resistance might nurture autonomous subjectivity, as e.g. constructive work, alternative communities, oppositional ways of thinking.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2015) to present.

Access Journal of Resistance Studies via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Trial access to Oxford Research Encyclopaedias

Trial access is now enabled up to 30 November 2019 for the following disciplines from Oxford Research Encyclopaedias:

African History
Education
Literature
American History
Encyclopedia of Social Work
Natural Hazard Science
Asian History
Environmental Science
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Climate Science
International Studies
Politics
Communication
Latin American History
Psychology
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Linguistics
Religion

Please tell us what you think about these e-resources by completing the feedback form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Journal of Human Trafficking

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Human Trafficking

From the Taylor & Francis website for the journal:

The Journal of Human Trafficking (JHT) is devoted to the dissemination of scholarship on all issues related to trafficking in persons and allied forms of contemporary slavery. The principal aim of the journal is to draw upon insights and expertise from a variety of disciplines and perspectives in order to better understand the global dimensions of – and evolving policy responses relating to – human trafficking.

“The journal publishes research on human trafficking from a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to, anthropology, criminology, communications, family studies, forensic science, social work, sociology, law, medicine, nursing and public health, psychology, and public policy. Although focused on research, the journal serves as a bridge between theory, applied research and practice to help fill the gap in understanding between scholars and practitioners.

“The Journal of Human Trafficking provides a centralized outlet for the publication and dissemination of scholarship and practice on all human trafficking-related phenomenon, with emphasis on serving as a centralized resource where researchers, scientists, policy makers, practitioners, and students alike may find the most recent information, current and cutting edge discoveries, as well as field-tested “best practices” within the human trafficking field.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2015) to present.

Access Journal of Human Trafficking via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “The Vienna Forum against Human Trafficking” by UNODC UNGIFT on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/8kv6Ef

Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies

From the Project muse website for the journal:

Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to traditional, anthropological, social, and applied archaeologies of the Eastern Mediterranean, encompassing both prehistoric and historic periods. The journal’s geographic range spans three continents and brings together, as no academic periodical has done before, the archaeologies of Greece and the Aegean, Anatolia, the Levant, Cyprus, Egypt, and North Africa.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2013) to present.

Access Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “Illuminated Manuscript The Bay of Saronikos (Atene) with the city of Athens, from Book on Navigation, Walters Art Museum Ms. W.658, fol.121a” by Walters Art Museum Illuminated manuscripts on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/895ZEC

Journal of the Polynesian Society

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of the Polynesian Society


From the journal website:

Journal of the Polynesian Society [publishes] papers from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the past and present lives and cultures of peoples of Pacific/Oceanic heritage, including those of the traditional cultural areas of Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia. This includes submissions in the areas of social anthropology, archaeology, ethnology, history, museum and material culture studies, Māori and Pacific Studies, linguistics and biological anthropology. The Journal is published quarterly and includes main articles (typically between 7000-10,000 words), shorter communications (4000 words or less), correspondence and book reviews.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from the journal website from volume 121 (2012) to present. Access from vol 1 (1892) to volume 122 (2013) from the JSTOR platform.

Access Journal of the Polynesian Society via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘French Polynesia’ by Klaquetes on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/5KmqtG

Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Res: Anthropology and aesthetics.

12457773764_9a4edddc58_zFrom the Chicago University Press website for the journal:

RES is a journal of anthropology and comparative aesthetics dedicated to the study of the object, in particular cult and belief objects and objects of art. The journal brings together, in an anthropological perspective, contributions by art historians, archaeologists, philosophers, critics, architects, artists, and others. Its field of inquiry is open to all cultures, regions, and historical periods. In addition, RES seeks to make available textual and iconographic documents of importance for the history and theory of the arts.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 37 (2000) to present.

Access Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link. Volume 1 (1987) to volume 63-64 (2013) are available from JSTOR via this link.

Image credit: ‘Glazed tile giant statue’ by Atlbordee Kongprepan on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/jYRm7Q

eHRAF: Human Relations Area Files: Archaeology & World Cultures

The University Library has arranged access to the Human Relations Area Files (eHRAF) Archaeology and World Cultures at the following links:

eHRAF World Cultures

eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database that contains descriptive information on all aspects of cultural and social life. The annually-growing eHRAF database is unique in that the information is organized by cultures and ethnic groups and every document is subject-indexed at the paragraph level, facilitating precise retrieval within documents.

eHRAF Archaeology

eHRAF Archaeology is an online cross-cultural database containing information on world’s prehistory. The annually-growing eHRAF database is organized by archaeological traditions and the documents are subject-indexed at the paragraph level. eHRAF Archaeology is a unique resource designed to facilitate comparative archaeological studies.

 

The eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database containing descriptive information on cultures (based on the Outline of World Cultures -OWC) and ethnic groups from around the world. eHRAF is unique because each culture contains a variety of documents (books, articles, and dissertations) that have been subject-indexed at the paragraph level by anthropologists according to HRAF’s comprehensive Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This feature extends search capability well beyond keyword searching, allowing for precise culture and subject retrieval, even in a foreign language. As an ethnographic database, eHRAF appeals to many academic disciplines in the social sciences, humanities, medicine, and any other area with an interest in cultural diversity.

eHRAF Archaeology is an award-winning online database with information on the prehistory of the world. This database, modeled after eHRAF World Cultures, is unique in that the information is organized into archaeological traditions and the text is numerically subject-indexed according to HRAF’s modified Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This comprehensive subject retrieval system extends search capability well beyond keyword searching allowing for precise subject retrieval, even in foreign language texts. eHRAF Archaeology is organized by regions and archaeological traditions. View Traditions Covered for a list of traditions currently included. Each tradition consists of a general summary and documents including books, journal articles, dissertations, and manuscripts.

The archaeological database provides researchers and students access to archaeological materials for comparative studies within and across regions. Traditions are selected by random sampling from the Outline of Archaeological Traditions compiled with the help of a distinguished Board of Advisors. To encourage historical and evolutionary analysis, the traditions prior to, and following, each tradition will be included in subsequent installments.

Links to eHRAF can be found in the eresources@cambridge A-Z Resources for Archaeology and Anthropology page and in the LibGuides Databases A-Z.