Journal of the Polynesian Society

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of the Polynesian Society


From the journal website:

Journal of the Polynesian Society [publishes] papers from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the past and present lives and cultures of peoples of Pacific/Oceanic heritage, including those of the traditional cultural areas of Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia. This includes submissions in the areas of social anthropology, archaeology, ethnology, history, museum and material culture studies, Māori and Pacific Studies, linguistics and biological anthropology. The Journal is published quarterly and includes main articles (typically between 7000-10,000 words), shorter communications (4000 words or less), correspondence and book reviews.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from the journal website from volume 121 (2012) to present. Access from vol 1 (1892) to volume 122 (2013) from the JSTOR platform.

Access Journal of the Polynesian Society via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘French Polynesia’ by Klaquetes on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/5KmqtG

Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Res: Anthropology and aesthetics.

12457773764_9a4edddc58_zFrom the Chicago University Press website for the journal:

RES is a journal of anthropology and comparative aesthetics dedicated to the study of the object, in particular cult and belief objects and objects of art. The journal brings together, in an anthropological perspective, contributions by art historians, archaeologists, philosophers, critics, architects, artists, and others. Its field of inquiry is open to all cultures, regions, and historical periods. In addition, RES seeks to make available textual and iconographic documents of importance for the history and theory of the arts.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 37 (2000) to present.

Access Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link. Volume 1 (1987) to volume 63-64 (2013) are available from JSTOR via this link.

Image credit: ‘Glazed tile giant statue’ by Atlbordee Kongprepan on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/jYRm7Q

eHRAF: Human Relations Area Files: Archaeology & World Cultures

The University Library has arranged access to the Human Relations Area Files (eHRAF) Archaeology and World Cultures at the following links:

eHRAF World Cultures

eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database that contains descriptive information on all aspects of cultural and social life. The annually-growing eHRAF database is unique in that the information is organized by cultures and ethnic groups and every document is subject-indexed at the paragraph level, facilitating precise retrieval within documents.

eHRAF Archaeology

eHRAF Archaeology is an online cross-cultural database containing information on world’s prehistory. The annually-growing eHRAF database is organized by archaeological traditions and the documents are subject-indexed at the paragraph level. eHRAF Archaeology is a unique resource designed to facilitate comparative archaeological studies.

 

The eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database containing descriptive information on cultures (based on the Outline of World Cultures -OWC) and ethnic groups from around the world. eHRAF is unique because each culture contains a variety of documents (books, articles, and dissertations) that have been subject-indexed at the paragraph level by anthropologists according to HRAF’s comprehensive Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This feature extends search capability well beyond keyword searching, allowing for precise culture and subject retrieval, even in a foreign language. As an ethnographic database, eHRAF appeals to many academic disciplines in the social sciences, humanities, medicine, and any other area with an interest in cultural diversity.

eHRAF Archaeology is an award-winning online database with information on the prehistory of the world. This database, modeled after eHRAF World Cultures, is unique in that the information is organized into archaeological traditions and the text is numerically subject-indexed according to HRAF’s modified Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This comprehensive subject retrieval system extends search capability well beyond keyword searching allowing for precise subject retrieval, even in foreign language texts. eHRAF Archaeology is organized by regions and archaeological traditions. View Traditions Covered for a list of traditions currently included. Each tradition consists of a general summary and documents including books, journal articles, dissertations, and manuscripts.

The archaeological database provides researchers and students access to archaeological materials for comparative studies within and across regions. Traditions are selected by random sampling from the Outline of Archaeological Traditions compiled with the help of a distinguished Board of Advisors. To encourage historical and evolutionary analysis, the traditions prior to, and following, each tradition will be included in subsequent installments.

Links to eHRAF can be found in the eresources@cambridge A-Z Resources for Archaeology and Anthropology page and in the LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

eHRAF World Cultures/Archaeology trial

Trial access is now available (ending date TBC) to the eHRAF World Cultures and eHRAF Archaeology databases.

Access the trials via the links below:

eHRAF World Cultures

eHRAF Archaeology

The eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database containing descriptive information on cultures (based on the Outline of World Cultures -OWC) and ethnic groups from around the world. eHRAF is unique because each culture contains a variety of documents (books, articles, and dissertations) that have been subject-indexed at the paragraph level by anthropologists according to HRAF’s comprehensive Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This feature extends search capability well beyond keyword searching, allowing for precise culture and subject retrieval, even in a foreign language. As an ethnographic database, eHRAF appeals to many academic disciplines in the social sciences, humanities, medicine, and any other area with an interest in cultural diversity.

eHRAF Archaeology is an online cross-cultural database containing descriptive information on archaeological traditions of the world and is modeled after eHRAF World Cultures. eHRAF is unique because each archaeological tradition contains a variety of documents (books, articles, and dissertations) that have been indexed and organized according to HRAF’s comprehensive tradition and subject classification systems: the Outline of Archaeological Traditions (OAT), and the Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). These retrieval systems extend search capability well beyond keyword searching thus allowing for precise tradition and subject retrieval, even in a foreign language. The eHRAF Archaeology database provides researchers and students access to archaeological materials for comparative studies within and across regions.

Please send your feedback on this trial to asb12@cam.ac.uk

Thank you!

According to Smithsonian magazine, “In a new study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, a folklorist and anthropologist say that stories like Rumpelstiltskin and Jack and the Beanstalk are much older than originally thought. Instead of dating from the 1500s, the researchers say that some of these classic stories are 4,000 and 5,000 years old, respectively.”

JSTOR Arts & Science XIV Archive Collection

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z: JSTOR Arts & Science XIV Archive Collection

'Guerreiros de Terracota em Xi'An, China' by Ana Paula Hirama (on Flickr)

‘Guerreiros de Terracota em Xi’An, China’ by Ana Paula Hirama (on Flickr)

From the JSTOR website:

“The Arts & Sciences XIV Collection brings together more than 140 journals devoted to the study of culture and communication, from civilization’s earliest traces to the growth and governance of peoples. A group of titles in science and technology also cover aspects of STEM education, and explore the legal implications, cultural impact, and historical development of science and technology.

All titles are new to the JSTOR platform at the time of launch. Journals in the collection span 17 countries, 23 disciplines, and date back to 1839. They are drawn primarily from the fields of Archaeology, Language & Literature, Communications Studies, Asian Studies, Political Science, and Education.”

Notable titles include:

A full title list for the package can be found on the JSTOR website.

Access the various titles from JSTOR Arts & Science XIV Archive Collection via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z. Access to the articles will be available in iDiscover next week.

South Asian History and Culture

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : SOUTH ASIAN HISTORY AND CULTURE

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From the Taylor & Francis website for the journal:

South Asian History and Culture (SAHC) is a multidisciplinary journal that provides an integrated perspective on the field of South Asian studies. The journal brings together research on South Asia in the humanities and social sciences, and provides scholars with a platform covering, but not restricted to, their particular fields of interest and specialization. Such an approach is critical to the field, for the development of more informed and broader perspectives, and of more overarching theoretical conceptions.

“SAHC brings together established areas of study (eg. nationalism, communalism, gender, language and literature) and more recent frameworks (e.g. minority rights, sexuality studies, terrorism). A focus is also to make more mainstream the more recently developed disciplines in the field of South Asian studies, which have to date remained specialized fields, for instance research on film, media, photography, sport, medicine and the environment…A significant concern for this journal is to focus across the region known as South Asia, and not simply on India, as most ‘South Asia’ forums inevitably do. We are conscious of this gap in South Asian studies and work to bring into focus more scholarship on and from Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and other parts of South Asia.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2009)  to present.

Access South Asian History and Culture via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘A woman and a rice field. Bangladesh. Photo by Peter Fredenburg’ by WorldFish on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/bBMwg7

Convivium

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : CONVIVIUM: Exchanges and interactions in the arts of medieval Europe, Byzantium, and the Medittereanean.

2699032586_98af5fbcdd_oConvivium is a continuation of the title Seminarium Kondakovianum, the journal of the institute founded in the memory of Nikodim Kondakov in 1927.

Convivum’s main focus is on art history, but will also cover topics including anthropology, archaeology, historiography and liturgy ranging from the Early Christian period to the end of the Middle Ages.

Articles will be published in French, English, Italian or German.

This title is published twice a year.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2014) to present.

Access Soil Science via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘xti_9138’ by Holly Hayes on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/57vfmA