Anthropology Resource Centre : access until 2nd December 2020

University of Cambridge members now have access to Anthropology Resource Centre until 2nd December 2020.

Please send your feedback about any of these eresources using the online form.

The Alexander Street Anthropology collections offer comprehensive, multimedia resources for the study of anthropology, including the largest collection of ethnographic videos and previously unpublished archival field materials. Content is presented on a multimedia platform that reflects the integrated methods of field research, through linking and cross-searchability of text, audiovisual and archival primary sources. Our resources work in tandem to bring the fieldwork process to life by juxtaposing original fieldwork with subsequent published ethnographies, as well as follow up studies and visual ethnographies that span a century.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Text taken from the Alexander Street platform.

Costume : the journal of the Costume Society

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z :

Costume : the journal of the Costume Society

From the Edinburgh University Press website:

Costume is a scholarly, refereed publication presenting current research into historic and contemporary dress. The journal publishes articles from a broad chronological period and with a worldwide remit; it maintains a balance between practice and theory and concentrates on the social significance of dress. The journal also includes reviews and listings of new books, journal articles and exhibitions.

“The editorial team’s complementary expertise and experience as curators, writers and lecturers ensure a wide network of contacts throughout the diverse world of dress and textile studies. Articles are welcomed from both established researchers and those new to the field.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 34 (2000) to present.

Access Costume via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Photo by Elijah O’Donnell from Pexels

JSTOR collections available until 31st December 2020 (Struggles for Freedom South Africa, World Heritage Sites, Lives of Literature, Security Studies, Sustainability)

We have access to 6 further JSTOR collections until 31st December 2020.

Please send your feedback about these collections via the online form.

Aluka : Struggles for Freedom Southern Africa

The liberation of Southern Africa and the dismantling of the Apartheid regime was one of the major political developments of the 20th century, with far-reaching consequences for people throughout Africa and around the globe. This collection focuses on the complex and varied liberation struggles in the region, with an emphasis on Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. It brings together materials from various archives and libraries throughout the world documenting colonial rule, dispersion of exiles, international intervention, and the worldwide networks that supported successive generations of resistance within the region.

Aluka : World Heritage Sites Africa

World Heritage Sites: Africa is a versatile collection of more than 86,000 objects of visual, contextual, and spatial documentation of African heritage and rock art sites.

It offers more than 86,000 objects in 30 sub-collections, providing visual, contextual, and spatial documentation of African heritage sites.

Lives of Literature

JSTOR Lives of Literature is a collection of academic journals devoted to the deep study of writers and texts associated with core literary movements. Key topics include: Medieval Authors & Texts; Modernist Authors; Victorian, Edwardian & Gothic Authors; and Literary Theorists.

A complete title list is available to view here.

Security Studies

Explore a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of security studies. This content looks at security studies through a broad lens, encompassing research on international security and peace and conflict studies from all corners of the globe.

Sustainability

Discover a wide range of journals, ebooks, and research reports in the field of sustainability. The subjects of resilience and sustainability are explored broadly, covering research on environmental stresses and their impact on society.

Arts & Sciences Collection XV

Collection XV has been added to our library in addition to collections I to XIV that are already available to us. A title list for this collection is available here. Now, when you search the JSTOR platform, you will have full text access to all of the collections.

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile from Pexels

Photo ’15’ by Duncan C from Flickr.

New e-resource : International Encyclopedia of Anthropology

The University of Cambridge now has access to the International Encyclopedia of Anthropology.

From the Wiley website:

This encyclopedia the most complete reference resource for the field of anthropology and interrelated areas, providing an authoritative and expert overview of the concepts, research, and techniques that together define the discipline.

Over 1,000 entries, ranging from concise summaries to longer writings, present the reader with in-depth discussions of hundreds of key topics, including: ecology, human evolution, gender, health, language and education, kinship, politics, and power, as well as biographical entries of many of the world’s most influential founding anthropologists.

The International Encyclopedia of Anthropology is available to access via the direct links in this post or the Databases A-Z.

Wiley Digital Archives : access until 30th June 2020

We now have access to 4 further collections in the Wiley Digital Archives:

Access is available until 30th June 2020.

Please send your feedback via the online form.

Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) archive

Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) was founded in 1830. The learned Society promotes the advancement of geographical science in all its aspects. The Society’s archive contains vast collections of documents, maps, photographs, expedition reports, manuscript materials and books, and span 500 years of geography, travel and exploration. The RGS holds one of the largest private map collections in the world. It includes one million sheets of maps and charts, 3000 atlases, 40 globes (as gores or mounted on stands) and 1000 gazetteers. The earliest printed cartographic item dates back to 1485.

The Archive includes Maps, Atlases, Charts and Plans; Expedition Reports; Fieldnotes, Correspondence and Diaries; Grey Literature; Photographs, Artwork and Illustrations; Journal Manuscripts; Photographs; Proceedings, Lectures, and Ephemera. The collection spans a wide variety of interdisciplinary research areas, and supports educational needs in Anthropology, Area Studies; Cartography and Visualizations, Colonial, Post-Colonial & Decolonisation Studies; Development Studies; Environmental Degradation; Historical & Cultural Geography; Historical Sociology; Human Geography; Identity, Gender & Ethnic Studies; Geology; International Relations; Trade and Commerce, and Law and Policy relating to Colonization.

Royal College of Physicians archive

From the founding charter to 20th-century reports on the effects of smoking, there is a wealth of material on the RCP’s role in relation to contemporary medical advances. The RCP was founded so that physicians could be formally licensed to practise and those who were not qualified could be exposed and punished. There are many archive records defining the RCP’s changing role in setting standards in medical practice. RCP members have always collected manuscripts and papers on a wide range of medical and non-medical topics. As a result the archives contain an eclectic range of 14th- to 19th-century manuscripts. Personal papers of past fellows from the 16th century to the 20th century provide glimpses into the personal lives and social concerns of many distinguished physicians.

Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland archive

The Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (RAI) is the world’s longest-established scholarly association dedicated to the furtherance of anthropology (the study of humankind) in its broadest and most inclusive sense.

This archive includes maps, photographs and manuscripts.

New York Academy of Sciences archive

For 200 years—since 1817—the Academy has brought together extraordinary people working at the frontiers of discovery. Among the oldest scientific organizations in the United States, it has become not only an enduring cultural institution in New York, but also one of the most significant organizations in the global scientific community. Throughout its history, the Academy’s Membership has featured thinkers and innovators from all walks of life, including U.S. Presidents Jefferson and Monroe, Thomas Edison, Charles Darwin, Margaret Mead, and many more.

 

Ethnographic Sound Archives Online : access until 30th June 2020

Ethnographic Sound Archives Online are available to access on the Alexander Street Press platform until 30th June 2020.

If you have any feedback about this resource please send it to us via the online form.

Ethnographic Sound Archives Online brings together over 2,000 hours of previously unpublished historic field recordings from around the world, alongside their supporting field notes and ethnographers’ metadata, opening new paths for the study of music in its cultural context.

Nature and Scope

The practice of going into the field to “collect” music dates to the early 20th century, as innovations like the portable phonograph enabled sounds to be recorded on wax cylinders. In response to a growing commercialized music industry, and tied to the Romantic Era notion of disappearing cultures, early field workers such as Frances Densmore and Alan Lomax traveled to remote areas to document and preserve everyday songs and language. By the 1960s, sound collectors began incorporating theories and methods from cultural anthropology—and ethnomusicology as an academic field of study was born.

Ethnographic Sound Archives Online brings together 2,000 hours of audio recordings from field expeditions around the world, particularly from the 1960s through the 1980s—the dawn of ethnomusicology as a codified discipline. Building on their predecessors’ early sound collecting methods, ethnomusicologists began to fill in gaps on the world music map, traveling to field sites to record and document music in its broader cultural context. These collectors’ bodies of work contain some of the most comprehensive surveys of regional music on record, including Mark Slobin’s survey of Afghan music, Nazir Jairazbhoy’s survey of classical Indian music, and Hugh Tracey’s survey of southern and central African music.

Music is tightly woven into society and culture — it accompanies rituals and dances, and fills social spaces. It is the goal of the ethnomusicologist to document sound in this broader context, so field recordings are often accompanied by film footage, photographs, handwritten notes, and records of the larger soundscape. Where possible, the audio in this collection is presented along with its contextual materials, totaling more than 10,000 pages of field notes and 150 hours of film footage, re-creating music’s relationship to its cultural context in a digital space.

Text taken from the Alexander Street Press platform.

Journal of Resistance Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Resistance Studies

From the  website for the journal:

Journal of Resistance Studies is a new international, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed scientific journal that explores unarmed resistance. The articles we want to publish focus on critical understandings of resistance strategies, discourses, tactics, effects, causes, contexts and experiences. Our aim is to advance an understanding of how resistance might undermine repression, injustices and domination of any kind, as well as how resistance might nurture autonomous subjectivity, as e.g. constructive work, alternative communities, oppositional ways of thinking.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2015) to present.

Access Journal of Resistance Studies via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Trial access to Oxford Research Encyclopaedias

Trial access is now enabled up to 30 November 2019 for the following disciplines from Oxford Research Encyclopaedias:

African History
Education
Literature
American History
Encyclopedia of Social Work
Natural Hazard Science
Asian History
Environmental Science
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Climate Science
International Studies
Politics
Communication
Latin American History
Psychology
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Linguistics
Religion

Please tell us what you think about these e-resources by completing the feedback form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Journal of Human Trafficking

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Human Trafficking

From the Taylor & Francis website for the journal:

The Journal of Human Trafficking (JHT) is devoted to the dissemination of scholarship on all issues related to trafficking in persons and allied forms of contemporary slavery. The principal aim of the journal is to draw upon insights and expertise from a variety of disciplines and perspectives in order to better understand the global dimensions of – and evolving policy responses relating to – human trafficking.

“The journal publishes research on human trafficking from a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to, anthropology, criminology, communications, family studies, forensic science, social work, sociology, law, medicine, nursing and public health, psychology, and public policy. Although focused on research, the journal serves as a bridge between theory, applied research and practice to help fill the gap in understanding between scholars and practitioners.

“The Journal of Human Trafficking provides a centralized outlet for the publication and dissemination of scholarship and practice on all human trafficking-related phenomenon, with emphasis on serving as a centralized resource where researchers, scientists, policy makers, practitioners, and students alike may find the most recent information, current and cutting edge discoveries, as well as field-tested “best practices” within the human trafficking field.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2015) to present.

Access Journal of Human Trafficking via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “The Vienna Forum against Human Trafficking” by UNODC UNGIFT on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/8kv6Ef

Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies

From the Project muse website for the journal:

Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to traditional, anthropological, social, and applied archaeologies of the Eastern Mediterranean, encompassing both prehistoric and historic periods. The journal’s geographic range spans three continents and brings together, as no academic periodical has done before, the archaeologies of Greece and the Aegean, Anatolia, the Levant, Cyprus, Egypt, and North Africa.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2013) to present.

Access Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “Illuminated Manuscript The Bay of Saronikos (Atene) with the city of Athens, from Book on Navigation, Walters Art Museum Ms. W.658, fol.121a” by Walters Art Museum Illuminated manuscripts on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/895ZEC