Journal of Imaging Science and Technology

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Imaging Science and Technology.

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From IngentaConnect and the journal website:

“The Journal of Imaging Science and Technology (JIST) is dedicated to the advancement of imaging science knowledge, the practical applications of such knowledge, and how imaging science relates to other fields of study. ”

“Typical issues include research papers and/or comprehensive reviews from a variety of topical areas. In the spirit of fostering constructive scientific dialog, the Journal accepts Letters to the Editor commenting on previously published articles. Periodically the Journal features a Special Section containing a group of related— usually invited—papers introduced by a Guest Editor. Imaging research topics that have coverage in JIST include:

  • Digital printing technologies, including ink jet and thermal printing
  • Digital fabrication
  • Materials and processes of electrophotography
  • Prepress and printing technologies
  • Image capture media and technologies including digital cameras
  • Image analysis, interpretation, and quality
  • Color image science
  • Hard and soft displays
  • Image archiving and image permanence
  • Chemistry of photosensitive materials including silver halides”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 40 (1996) to present.

Access Journal of Imaging Science and Technology via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Ocean Sand, Bahamas’ ny NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/9AeSkd

e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis

The University of Cambridge now has access to the important reference work for reagents and catalysts for the study or organic synthesis, e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis.

The Encyclopedia can be accessed via this link or via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

e-EROS gives detailed information on more than 4,500 reagents and catalysts, and every year more than 200 new or updated articles are added in order to keep the Database up-to-date.

A representation of quite a small molecule: an isomer of the alkane C16H34. Possibly the simplest molecule that can never be made.

 

Access has been enabled by collaboration between the University Library, the Betty and Gordon Moore Library and the Department of Chemistry Library.

American Chemical Society announces intention to establish “ChemRxiv” preprint server to promote early research sharing

WASHINGTON, Aug. 10, 2016 — The American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced its intention to form ChemRxiv, a chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, proposed as a collaborative undertaking that will facilitate the open dissemination of important scientific findings. The Society is presently in the process of inviting interested stakeholders to participate in helping to shape the service ahead of its anticipated launch.

ChemRxiv is expected to follow the established models of arXiv in physics and bioRxiv in the life sciences by enabling researchers working across diverse areas of inquiry to share early results and data with their scientist-colleagues ahead of formal peer review and publication,” says Kevin Davies, Ph.D., who, as Vice President within the ACS Publications Division, will be spearheading the effort as part of a joint undertaking with the Society’s Chemical Abstracts Service. “Preprints are fully citable and are freely accessible preliminary communications, aimed to advance the pace of scientific discovery and information dissemination. The chemistry community has a growing interest in such open sharing to aid researchers in establishing recognition and priority for their research discoveries, while also providing a mechanism to elicit informal feedback from other scientists to help in shaping their ongoing work.”

“The ACS is advancing the concept for ChemRxiv, as doing so aligns with key aspects of our Society’s mission and goals, notably the advancement of science through the dissemination of indispensable chemistry-related information worldwide,” says Thomas Connelly Jr., Ph.D., ACS Executive Director and CEO. “Furthermore, in keeping with our mission of service to the global chemistry community, the American Chemical Society recognizes there is considerable merit in pursuing ChemRxiv as a multi-organization venture — with an eye toward interoperability with various sources of chemistry-related information. Accordingly, we invite interested parties to become potential co-organizers and sponsors, and will be engaging in a broad consultation to help shape the scope, governance and operating principles for ChemRxiv as a collaborative endeavor.”

From initial market research and expert feedback, including advice and encouragement from editors-in-chief of ACS Journals, the Society has identified broad support for the launch of a chemistry preprint server. Over the coming months, and in collaboration with potential partners, a full evaluation will be completed to ensure ChemRxiv supports the specific needs of the chemistry-research and publishing community.

“An ACS-sponsored chemistry preprint server would be an important and forward-looking contribution to the global community and to science,” says Laura Kiessling, Ph.D., Steenbock Professor of Chemistry and the Laurens Anderson Professor of Biochemistry, Director of the Keck Center for Chemical Genomics at the University of Wisconsin and the Editor-in-Chief of ACS Chemical Biology.

“Conceptually, preprint servers could solve one problem we face today in academic publishing related to peer review,” says Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley’s Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Director of the Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute and Co-Editor-in-Chief of Nano Letters. “By its nature, peer review can be a trade-off between time and quality. The availability of a chemistry preprint server would provide researchers a speedy mechanism by which to share their results and data, and would, in turn, allow peer reviewers and journal editors to focus their efforts on assessing the scientific accuracy and quality of research articles prior to formal journal publication. … Given the popularity of preprint servers in physics and now biology, chemistry will have a preprint server. It is a positive move by the ACS to foster this initiative in this way,” Alivisatos affirmed.

For further detail see:

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2016/august/acs-announces-intention-to-establish-chemrxiv-preprint-server-to-promote-early-research-sharing.html

Synfacts

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : SYNFACTS.

In SYNFACTS, current research results in chemical synthesis from the primary literature are screened, selected, evaluated, summarized, and enriched with personal comments by experts in their fields on a monthly basis.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from 2005 to present.

Access Synfacts via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

ChemElectroChem

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : chemelectrochem.

 

ElectrochemCell

From the ‘aims and scope’ page:

ChemElectroChem is aimed to become a top-ranking electrochemistry journal for primary research papers and critical secondary information from authors across the world. The journal covers the entire scope of pure and applied electrochemistry, the latter encompassing (among others) energy applications, electrochemistry at interfaces (including surfaces), photoelectrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry. “

Published by Wiley-VCH on behalf of ChemPubSoc Europe.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2014) to present.

Access ChemELectrochem via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis

Trial access is now available to e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis

Access is available until 4 June 2016 via this link.

Please send your feedback on e-EROS to : cmc32@cam.ac.uk

e-EROS is the one source for in-depth online information on reagents and catalysts for all chemists planning or working on organic syntheses.

e-EROS gives detailed information on more than 4,500 reagents and catalysts, and every year more than 200 new or updated articles are added in order to keep the database up-to-date.

Artificial Photosynthesis – in Lego!

Reisner group members David Wakerley and Chris Windle have created this YouTube video with Lego to explain the group’s research into artificial photosynthesis.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

SciFinder update

The information page and link to SciFinder from the eresources@cambridge A-Z and the Department of Chemistry website has just been updated.  The new page is here:

http://www-library.ch.cam.ac.uk/scifinder/

We are very pleased to inform users about this as now access is seamless after registration for both on and off campus users (where before off campus had not been possible).  The new page, including the new links, is reproduced below:-

SciFinder access

SciFinder requires you to complete a registration form before you can access it. This is a simple process and only needs to be done once. You will be asked to give your name and to create a username and password. A link will be sent to your email account to activate your registration. Thereafter you will use your username and password to sign in to SciFinder.

Access routes

If you are on campus,

To register:

https://scifinder.cas.org/registration/index.html?corpKey=8122DE45-86F3-F014-1111-908054A5FEE5

Once you have registered:

https://scifinder.cas.org/scifinder

If you are off campus,

To register:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=https://scifinder.cas.org/registration/index.html?corpKey=8122DE45-86F3-F014-1111-908054A5FEE5

Once you have registered:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=https://scifinder.cas.org/scifinder

 

On or off campus?

If you are in doubt as to whether or not you are accessing on or off campus go to this page.

At the top right of the page you will see a message that reads “ON CAMPUS We believe you are on campus … ” or “OFF CAMPUS We believe you are off campus …”.

Getting help

Please contact the Chemistry Library by email at library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

Or, for registration problems and direct technical support from CAS, please email help@cas.org.