E-resources Advent Calendar Window 3: Spotlight on Historical Newspapers

Cambridge University Libraries provide a wealth of digital archives of historical newspapers. This year we were proud and delighted to add to our collections the American Indian Newspapers collection from Adam Matthew Digital.

Our calendar window opens in a year earlier than most titles in the collection that grew out of the Wounded Knee Occupation. The collection’s unique titles invite researchers to expore subjects including the self-determination era and American Indian Movement (AIM), education, environmentalism, land rights, and cultural representation from an Indigenous perspective.

From the collection we share the Christmas joy felt in 1926 in the Indian School Journal, in this poem by Philipps Brooks published in the Indian School Journal, December 1926, © Sequoyah National Research Center, University of Arkansas, Little Rock.

Everywhere, everywhere, Christmas tonight!

Christmas in lands of the fir-tree and pine,

Christmas in lands of the palm-tree and vine,

Christmas where snow peaks stand solemn and white,

Christmas where corn-fields lie sunny and bright,

Christmas where children are hopeful and gay,

Christmas where old men are patient and gray;

Christmas where peace, is like a dove in its flight,

Broods o’er brave men in the thick of the fight;

Everywhere, everywhere, Christmas tonight,

For the Christ Child who comes is the master of all;

No palace too great and no cottage too small.

AshishTripurwar, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Nineteenth Century Collections Online (NCCO) trial access

Trial access to the entire 12 collections comprising Nineteenth Century Collections Online is provided to University of Cambridge members until 1st December 2022.

What do you think of NCCO? Have your say using the online feedback form. We value your feedback.

Nineteenth Century Collections Online offers unique ways to explore and find as well as to discover new relationships previously buried in archives that were once accessible only to the few.

Textual analysis tools, public and private tagging, an annotation feature, and social media sharing help users to organize content for their own research and to share their findings with colleagues.

The nineteenth century was the first great age of industrialization and technological innovation, an age of political revolution and reform, nationalism and nation building, the expansion of empire and colonialism, growing literacy and education, and the flowering of culture. Summaries of each of the 12 collections encompassing these themes are given below:-

Asia and the West

Asia and the West features primary source collections related to international relations between Asian countries and the West during the nineteenth century. These invaluable documents—many never before available—include government reports, diplomatic correspondences, periodicals, newspapers, treaties, trade agreements, NGO papers, and more. Documents are sourced from The National Archives, Kew; The National Archives, United States; and other collections.

This unmatched resource allows scholars to explore in great detail the history of British and U.S. foreign policy and diplomacy; Asian political, economic, and social affairs; the Philippine Insurrection; the Opium Wars; the Boxer Rebellion; missionary activity in Asia; and many other topics. Asia and the West also includes personal letters and diaries, offering first-hand accounts and revealing the human side of international politics, as well as nautical charts, maps, shipping ledgers, company records, and expedition and survey reports for more than a century of world history.

British Politics and Society

Including papers of British statesmen, Home Office records, ordnance surveys, working class autobiographies, and other unique collections, British Politics and Society is a remarkable resource for scholars looking to explore the political and social history of Britain. Source libraries are the British Library, Oxford University, and The National Archives, Kew.

British Politics and Society enables researchers to explore such topics as British domestic and foreign policy, trade unions, Chartism, utopian socialism, public protest, radical movements, the cartographic record, political reform, education, family relationships, religion, leisure and many others. With this archive scholars have instant access to a range of never-before-available primary sources, including manuscripts, maps, drawings, newspapers, periodicals, government correspondence, letters, diaries, photographs, poster, pamphlets and more.

British Theatre, Music, and Literature

British Theatre, Music, and Literature features a wide range of primary sources related to the arts in the long nineteenth century, from playbills and scripts to operas and complete scores. These rare documents, many of them never before available, are sourced from the British Library and other institutions. Curation is by experts in British arts history. Covering more than a century, and encompassing both the Georgian and Victorian theatre, British Theatre, Music, and Literature is without equal as a resource.

The collection provides a detailed look at the state of the British art world and includes manuscripts and musical compositions as well as documents such as personal letters, annotated programs, meeting minutes, and financial records. It offers scholars an unmatched glimpse into the inner workings of the world of the arts in Britain.

Children’s Literature and Childhood

Children’s Literature and Childhood provides a wide range of primary sources related to the experience of childhood in the long nineteenth century. Included in the archive are books and periodicals for children, primers and other material related to education, pamphlets produced by child welfare groups, documents and photos related to children and crime, newspapers produced by youths, and much more. This unique assemblage of material is sourced from such renowned institutions as the University of Florida’s Baldwin Library Collection of Historical Children’s Literature, the National Archives, Kew, and the British Library, among others.

Europe and Africa, Colonialism and Culture

Through a variety of official government documents, political papers of prominent individuals, and newspaper accounts, researchers can trace the development of British strategic imperatives, French and Belgian desire for the expansion of trade and raw materials, and Germany and Italy’s late entrance onto the imperial stage. Europe and Africa, Colonialism and Culture covers exploration, military and missionary activities, and economic and political imperialism in the ninetenth century. Documents are sourced from The National Archives, Kew; the U.S. National Archives; the Library of Congress; the National Library of Scotland; and Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

European Literature, the Corvey Collection, 1790–1840

European Literature, the Corvey Collection, 1790–1840 includes the full-text of more than 9,500 English, French and German titles. The collection is sourced from the remarkable library of Victor Amadeus, whose Castle Corvey collection was one of the most spectacular discoveries of the late 1970s. The Corvey Collection comprises one of the most important archives of Romantic era writing in existence anywhere—including fiction, short prose, dramatic works, poetry and more—with a focus on especially difficult-to-find works by lesser-known, historically neglected writers.

As a resource for Romantic literature and historical studies, the Corvey Collection is unmatched. It provides a wealth of fully searchable content with digital research tools that enable scholars to uncover new relationships among authors and works. The inclusion of texts from neglected writers further provides scholars with new topics for exploration. With the European Literature, the Corvey Collection, 1790–1840, scholars can research a range of topics, including Romantic literary genres; the mutual influences of British, French and German Romanticism; literary culture; women writers; the canon; Romantic aesthetics; and many other subjects.

Maps and Travel Literature

Spotlighting a distinguished array of historic atlases, gazetteers, travel narratives and a variety of maps, Maps and Travel Literature offers unique insight into the age of cartography and the rise of leisure travel. Sourced from the British Library, American Antiquarian Society, and the Bryn Mawr College Library, among others, the materials focus on travel and exploration during the nineteenth century, including a myriad of sketch maps created during colonial exploration and expansion.

Maps, historic atlases, and gazetteers offer unique city, town, and country information first used by the nineteenth century traveler, providing a window into the Age of Imperialism and the burgeoning middle classes. Featuring a multitude of both European and non-European travel narratives, the collection offers a glimpse not only of the lands and peoples these travelers encountered, but also valuable insight into how the Industrial Revolution changed people’s experiences in their ever-shrinking world.

Photography

Including images from Britain, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, Photography assembles collections of photographs, photograph albums, photographically illustrated books and texts on the early history of photography from libraries and archives from across the globe.

Religion, Reform, and Society

Religion, Reform, and Society examines the influence of both faith and skepticism on the shaping of many aspects of society—politics, law, economics, and social and radical reform movements. In the nineteenth century, the intellectual work of Comte, Marx, Weber, Darwin, Freud, and others unleashed secularizing impulses that gave rise to both new humanist religious projects and new faith-based social reform movements. The heightened interest in the perfection of man, the power of science, and the confidence in social progress also had an impact. Alongside Comte’s positivist “religion of humanity,” utopian collectives, and settlement houses, there grew a new fascination with alternative spiritual and mystical practices.

The archive provides essential documentary materials that explore religious and philosophical movements in reaction to dramatic changes in culture and society wrought by the industrial revolution and modernity. Topics covered include positivism and anti-positivism, freethinking, the cooperative movement, alternative Christianities, and the application of the social principles of Christianity to everyday life by a variety of denominations.

Science, Technology, and Medicine, Part I

Science, Technology, and Medicine, Part I features more than 3.5 million pages of journals, books, reports, and personal documents that explore the rapid acceleration of scientific, technical, and medical knowledge during the nineteenth century. Source libraries include the Huntington Library, the Burndy Library, the Library of Congress, and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.

Science, Technology, and Medicine, Part II

Science, Technology And Medicine, Part II, expands upon the subject coverage in Science, Technology And Medicine, 1780-1925, with an extraordinary gathering of European and British periodicals and American monographs from renowned sources. Collections include Natural History; The Rise of Public Health in England and Wales; and Academies of Science Publications.

The archive supports enhanced “scientific literacy,” and is sourced from the Huntington Library, the National Archives (Kew), and Brill, among renowned institutions. Using the archive, scholars will be able to analyze technical and conceptual dimensions of scientific knowledge—from physics to psychoanalysis to macroeconomics. Diversity of coverage ensures an expansive, integrated, global view of science and technology from a critical era of scientific development.

Women and Transnational Networks

Including a wide array of primary source documents—serials, books, manuscripts, diaries, reports, and visuals—Women and Transnational Networks focuses on issues at the intersection of gender and class from the late-eighteenth century to the era of suffrage in the early-twentieth century, all through a transnational perspective. Source libraries include the Library of Congress, the London School of Economics and Political Science Library, and the Library of the Society of Friends.

Image credits:

Photo by Pixabay: https://www.pexels.com/photo/printed-musical-note-page-164821/
Photo by cottonbro: https://www.pexels.com/photo/person-pointing-on-a-map-5302805/

Photo by Andrea De Santis: https://www.pexels.com/photo/people-inside-the-natural-history-museum-10391629/

China and the Modern World: trial access

Trial access to the China and the Modern World digital archive is provided to University of Cambridge members until 1st December 2022.

What do you think of China and the Modern World? Have your say using the online feedback form. We value your feedback.

War and Colonial Department and Colonial Office: Hong Kong, Original Correspondence

China and the Modern World is a series of digital archive collections sourced from preeminent libraries and archives across the world, including the Second Historical Archives of China and the British Library. The series covers a period of about 180 years (1800s to 1980s) when China experienced radical and often traumatic transformations from an inward-looking imperial dynasty into a globally engaged republic.

Consisting of monographs, manuscripts, periodicals, correspondence and letters, historical photos, ephemera, and other kinds of historical documents, these collections provide excellent primary source materials for the understanding and research of the various aspects of China during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, such as diplomacy/international relations, economy/trade, politics, Christianity, sinology, education, science and technology, imperialism, and globalization.

China and the Modern World: trial access

Trial access to the China and the Modern World digital archive is provided to University of Cambridge members until 10 August 2022.

Access China and the Modern World via this direct link.

What do you think of China and the Modern World? Have your say on this feedback form. We value your feedback.

War and Colonial Department and Colonial Office: Hong Kong, Original Correspondence

China and the Modern World is a series of digital archive collections sourced from preeminent libraries and archives across the world, including the Second Historical Archives of China and the British Library. The series covers a period of about 180 years (1800s to 1980s) when China experienced radical and often traumatic transformations from an inward-looking imperial dynasty into a globally engaged republic.

Consisting of monographs, manuscripts, periodicals, correspondence and letters, historical photos, ephemera, and other kinds of historical documents, these collections provide excellent primary source materials for the understanding and research of the various aspects of China during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, such as diplomacy/international relations, economy/trade, politics, Christianity, sinology, education, science and technology, imperialism, and globalization.

Nineteenth Century Collections Online (NCCO) trial access

Trial access to the entire 12 collections comprising Nineteenth Century Collections Online is provided to University of Cambridge members until 10 August 2022.

Access NCCO via this direct link.

What do you think of NCCO? Have your say on this feedback form. We value your feedback.

Nineteenth Century Collections Online offers unique ways to explore and find as well as to discover new relationships previously buried in archives that were once accessible only to the few.

Textual analysis tools, public and private tagging, an annotation feature, and social media sharing help users to organize content for their own research and to share their findings with colleagues.

The nineteenth century was the first great age of industrialization and technological innovation, an age of political revolution and reform, nationalism and nation building, the expansion of empire and colonialism, growing literacy and education, and the flowering of culture. Summaries of each of the 12 collections encompassing these themes are given below:-

Asia and the West

Asia and the West features primary source collections related to international relations between Asian countries and the West during the nineteenth century. These invaluable documents—many never before available—include government reports, diplomatic correspondences, periodicals, newspapers, treaties, trade agreements, NGO papers, and more. Documents are sourced from The National Archives, Kew; The National Archives, United States; and other collections.

This unmatched resource allows scholars to explore in great detail the history of British and U.S. foreign policy and diplomacy; Asian political, economic, and social affairs; the Philippine Insurrection; the Opium Wars; the Boxer Rebellion; missionary activity in Asia; and many other topics. Asia and the West also includes personal letters and diaries, offering first-hand accounts and revealing the human side of international politics, as well as nautical charts, maps, shipping ledgers, company records, and expedition and survey reports for more than a century of world history.

British Politics and Society

Including papers of British statesmen, Home Office records, ordnance surveys, working class autobiographies, and other unique collections, British Politics and Society is a remarkable resource for scholars looking to explore the political and social history of Britain. Source libraries are the British Library, Oxford University, and The National Archives, Kew.

British Politics and Society enables researchers to explore such topics as British domestic and foreign policy, trade unions, Chartism, utopian socialism, public protest, radical movements, the cartographic record, political reform, education, family relationships, religion, leisure and many others. With this archive scholars have instant access to a range of never-before-available primary sources, including manuscripts, maps, drawings, newspapers, periodicals, government correspondence, letters, diaries, photographs, poster, pamphlets and more.

British Theatre, Music, and Literature

British Theatre, Music, and Literature features a wide range of primary sources related to the arts in the long nineteenth century, from playbills and scripts to operas and complete scores. These rare documents, many of them never before available, are sourced from the British Library and other institutions. Curation is by experts in British arts history. Covering more than a century, and encompassing both the Georgian and Victorian theatre, British Theatre, Music, and Literature is without equal as a resource.

The collection provides a detailed look at the state of the British art world and includes manuscripts and musical compositions as well as documents such as personal letters, annotated programs, meeting minutes, and financial records. It offers scholars an unmatched glimpse into the inner workings of the world of the arts in Britain.

Children’s Literature and Childhood

Children’s Literature and Childhood provides a wide range of primary sources related to the experience of childhood in the long nineteenth century. Included in the archive are books and periodicals for children, primers and other material related to education, pamphlets produced by child welfare groups, documents and photos related to children and crime, newspapers produced by youths, and much more. This unique assemblage of material is sourced from such renowned institutions as the University of Florida’s Baldwin Library Collection of Historical Children’s Literature, the National Archives, Kew, and the British Library, among others.

Europe and Africa, Colonialism and Culture

Through a variety of official government documents, political papers of prominent individuals, and newspaper accounts, researchers can trace the development of British strategic imperatives, French and Belgian desire for the expansion of trade and raw materials, and Germany and Italy’s late entrance onto the imperial stage. Europe and Africa, Colonialism and Culture covers exploration, military and missionary activities, and economic and political imperialism in the ninetenth century. Documents are sourced from The National Archives, Kew; the U.S. National Archives; the Library of Congress; the National Library of Scotland; and Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

European Literature, the Corvey Collection, 1790–1840

European Literature, the Corvey Collection, 1790–1840 includes the full-text of more than 9,500 English, French and German titles. The collection is sourced from the remarkable library of Victor Amadeus, whose Castle Corvey collection was one of the most spectacular discoveries of the late 1970s. The Corvey Collection comprises one of the most important archives of Romantic era writing in existence anywhere—including fiction, short prose, dramatic works, poetry and more—with a focus on especially difficult-to-find works by lesser-known, historically neglected writers.

As a resource for Romantic literature and historical studies, the Corvey Collection is unmatched. It provides a wealth of fully searchable content with digital research tools that enable scholars to uncover new relationships among authors and works. The inclusion of texts from neglected writers further provides scholars with new topics for exploration. With the European Literature, the Corvey Collection, 1790–1840, scholars can research a range of topics, including Romantic literary genres; the mutual influences of British, French and German Romanticism; literary culture; women writers; the canon; Romantic aesthetics; and many other subjects.

Maps and Travel Literature

Spotlighting a distinguished array of historic atlases, gazetteers, travel narratives and a variety of maps, Maps and Travel Literature offers unique insight into the age of cartography and the rise of leisure travel. Sourced from the British Library, American Antiquarian Society, and the Bryn Mawr College Library, among others, the materials focus on travel and exploration during the nineteenth century, including a myriad of sketch maps created during colonial exploration and expansion.

Maps, historic atlases, and gazetteers offer unique city, town, and country information first used by the nineteenth century traveler, providing a window into the Age of Imperialism and the burgeoning middle classes. Featuring a multitude of both European and non-European travel narratives, the collection offers a glimpse not only of the lands and peoples these travelers encountered, but also valuable insight into how the Industrial Revolution changed people’s experiences in their ever-shrinking world.

Photography

Including images from Britain, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, Photography assembles collections of photographs, photograph albums, photographically illustrated books and texts on the early history of photography from libraries and archives from across the globe.

Religion, Reform, and Society

Religion, Reform, and Society examines the influence of both faith and skepticism on the shaping of many aspects of society—politics, law, economics, and social and radical reform movements. In the nineteenth century, the intellectual work of Comte, Marx, Weber, Darwin, Freud, and others unleashed secularizing impulses that gave rise to both new humanist religious projects and new faith-based social reform movements. The heightened interest in the perfection of man, the power of science, and the confidence in social progress also had an impact. Alongside Comte’s positivist “religion of humanity,” utopian collectives, and settlement houses, there grew a new fascination with alternative spiritual and mystical practices.

The archive provides essential documentary materials that explore religious and philosophical movements in reaction to dramatic changes in culture and society wrought by the industrial revolution and modernity. Topics covered include positivism and anti-positivism, freethinking, the cooperative movement, alternative Christianities, and the application of the social principles of Christianity to everyday life by a variety of denominations.

Science, Technology, and Medicine, Part I

Science, Technology, and Medicine, Part I features more than 3.5 million pages of journals, books, reports, and personal documents that explore the rapid acceleration of scientific, technical, and medical knowledge during the nineteenth century. Source libraries include the Huntington Library, the Burndy Library, the Library of Congress, and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.

Science, Technology, and Medicine, Part II

Science, Technology And Medicine, Part II, expands upon the subject coverage in Science, Technology And Medicine, 1780-1925, with an extraordinary gathering of European and British periodicals and American monographs from renowned sources. Collections include Natural History; The Rise of Public Health in England and Wales; and Academies of Science Publications.

The archive supports enhanced “scientific literacy,” and is sourced from the Huntington Library, the National Archives (Kew), and Brill, among renowned institutions. Using the archive, scholars will be able to analyze technical and conceptual dimensions of scientific knowledge—from physics to psychoanalysis to macroeconomics. Diversity of coverage ensures an expansive, integrated, global view of science and technology from a critical era of scientific development.

Women and Transnational Networks

Including a wide array of primary source documents—serials, books, manuscripts, diaries, reports, and visuals—Women and Transnational Networks focuses on issues at the intersection of gender and class from the late-eighteenth century to the era of suffrage in the early-twentieth century, all through a transnational perspective. Source libraries include the Library of Congress, the London School of Economics and Political Science Library, and the Library of the Society of Friends.

British Online Archives – access all collections – Extended to 31 March 2022

From 1 February 2022 Cambridge University members will have access to all the digital archives on the British Online Archives platform.

The collections can be accessed on campus here or off campus here.

These primary source collections cover a diverse range of subjects and time periods, from colonialism and the world wars to political activism and international relations.

British Online Archives is making this access available as part of its response to the continuing challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, in recognition of the importance of remote learning for higher education.

British Online Archives – access all collections

From 1 February 2022 Cambridge University members will have access initially for 30 days to all the digital archives on the British Online Archives platform.

The collections can be accessed on campus here or off campus here.

These primary source collections cover a diverse range of subjects and time periods, from colonialism and the world wars to political activism and international relations.

British Online Archives is making this access available as part of its response to the continuing challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, in recognition of the importance of remote learning for higher education.

Trial access – American Religion: Denominational Newspapers (Readex)

Trial access to American Religion : Denominational Newspapers is now active and will run until 31 May 2021.

Please tell us what you think about these archives by completing the trial feedback form here. Thank you.

Exclusive focus on American denominational newspapers during the age of religion  

More than 320 newspapers from 30-plus states, all published between 1799 and 1900 

Important commentary on such social issues as slavery, women’s suffrage and the Temperance movement  

More information about this collection here.

Trial access: British and Irish Women’s Letters and Diaries

Trial access to the British and Irish Women’s Letters and Diaries has been made available until 14th May 2021.

This collection includes the immediate experiences of approximately 500 women, as revealed in over 100,000 pages of diaries and letters. Particular care has been taken to index this material so that it can be searched more thoroughly than ever before. The collection now includes primary materials spanning more than 300 years. Each source has been carefully chosen using leading bibliographies. The collection also includes biographies and an extensive annotated bibliography of the sources in the database.

Please tell us what you think about these archives by completing the trial feedback form here.

Featured content includes:

Letters of Mary, Queen of Scots

Browse a collection of letters from Mary, Queen of Scots during her imprisonment in England until her execution.  Correspondence include letters to King Philip II, Constable de Montmorency, Archbishop of Glasgow, Queen Elizabeth, Catherine de Medicis, Queen of France, and her last letter and will written the evening before her execution.

Occupation: Nurses

Read letters and diaries from women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries documenting their experiences nursing in a variety of medical settings.


War Diaries

Many women throughout history have survived numerous wars and conflicts. Read through various dairies written by women who lived through the French Revolution, Crimean War, and the Great Wars of the 20th century, including the diary of Anne Jane Walker Shepperd, a 26-year-old mother of three, describing daily life in London during the Blitz.

Travel

Browse letters and diaries from women as they document their travels throughout the world from fashion to food to new landmarks discovered. Countries visited and explored include: Italy, Norway, Russia, Egypt, Syria, South Africa, India, and New Zealand.

Trial access: Soviet Woman & Cumhuriyet Digital Archives

Trial access to the Cumhuriyet Digital Archive has been extended to 26 February. We are grateful to the publisher East View Information Services for this extension of access at this time. Cumhuriyet is Turkey’s oldest daily and leading opposition newspaper. For the original blog post on this trial please see here.

Trial access has also been enabled to the Soviet Woman digital archive via this link until 26 February.

Established in the aftermath of WWII in 1945, the magazine Soviet Woman proclaimed on the cover of its first issue its fundamental mission: “A magazine devoted to social and political problems, literature and art…” Published initially under the aegis of the of Soviet Women’s Anti-Fascist Committee and the Central Council of Trade Unions of the USSR, it began as a bimonthly illustrated magazine tasked with countering anti-Soviet propaganda by introducing Western audiences to the lifestyle of Soviet women, including their role in the post-WWII rebuilding of the Soviet economy, and their achievements in the arts and the sciences. Originally published simultaneously in Russian, English, German and French, the magazine went on to add more foreign language editions aimed at reaching an even wider audience both in the West and elsewhere to balance the Western narrative about the Soviet Union in these countries with a pro-Soviet ideological counterweight.

The Soviet Woman digital archive contains all obtainable published issues from the very first issue, comprising more than 500 issues and over 7,500 articles.

The Soviet Woman digital archive offers scholars the most comprehensive collection available for this title, and features full page-level digitization, complete original graphics, and searchable text, and is cross-searchable with numerous other East View digital resources.

Please tell us what you think about these archives by completing the trial feedback form here. Thank you