Davenport Papers and Slave Trade Records from Liverpool (British Online Archives) – Trial access to 6 July 2022

We are very pleased to announce that from today trial access to Slave Trading Records from William Davenport & Co., 1745-1797 and Slave Trade Records from Liverpool, 1754-1792 is available to 6 July 2022 for Cambridge University members.

Please tell us about your use of these resources via this feedback form.

Slave Trading Records from William Davenport & Co., 1745-1797

William Davenport was a Liverpool merchant and British slave trader. From the late 1740s till the early 1790s, he invested regularly in the African slave trade and was a partner in slaving ventures with other leading merchant Liverpool families.

Slave Trade Records from Liverpool, 1754-1792

This collection offers a window into one of the darkest episodes of Britain’s history. Over the course of the 18th century, Liverpool became Britain’s busiest and most profitable slave-trading port in the country. The practice of slavery was abolished in 1807 but not before British merchants had gained unimaginable wealth at the expense of enslaved African people, who were sold to new markets in the Americas.

New eresource – Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500-1926

Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500-1926 has been acquired from the legacy of Dr. Mark Kaplanoff, Fellow of Pembroke College, who endowed the University Library with funds to support the study of the history of the United States in the University of Cambridge.

Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500–1926 offers a perspective on life in the western hemisphere, encompassing the arrival of the Europeans on the shores of North America in the late fifteenth century to the first decades of the twentieth century.

Covering more than 400 years and more than 65,000 volumes in North, Central, and South America and the West Indies, this easy-to-use digital collection highlights the society, politics, religious beliefs, culture, contemporary opinions, and momentous events of the time through sermons, political tracts, newspapers, books, pamphlets, maps, legislation, literature, and more.

This digital collection, drawn from Joseph Sabin’s famed bibliography, Bibliotheca Americana: A Dictionary of Books Relating to America from Its Discovery to the Present Time, includes the following topics:

  • Discovery and exploration of the Americas — accounts from British, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, and Danish explorers and adventurers
  • Colonization — features both American and European views and firsthand accounts of colonial life
  • Slavery — memoirs, original speeches, lectures, sermons, discourses, reports to legislatures across America, pamphlets, books, and international essays
  • Cities and states — the social and political evolution of America’s major cities and states
  • Civil War — a wide array of memoirs, political tracts, published legislative proceedings, and broadsides
  • Reconstruction — records that describe the reorganization and re-establishment of the seceded states in the Union after the Civil War
  • American women — education, civil rights, domestic life, and employment
  • Native Americans — essays, booklets, treaties, land tracts, congressional speeches, journals, and letters that document social attitudes and personal experiences
  • Immigration — pamphlets, broadsides, speeches, articles, and books
  • Constitution — pamphlets, letters, speeches, and essays provide detailed information about the early political organization of the American colonies

Image by Abhay Bharadwaj from Pixabay

Russian Ottoman Relations 1600-1914 Online – Trial access

We are very pleased to announce that from today trial access to Russian-Ottoman Relations 1600-1914 Online is available to 4 June 2022 for Cambridge University members.

This series currently consists of 4 parts:
• Part 1: The Origins 1600-1800
• Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
• Part 3: The Crimean War 1854-1856
• Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914

Please tell us about your use of this resource and if you want continued access to it via this feedback form.

Cover images for Russian Ottoman Relations

From the publisher website:

Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a vital and dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East and Western Europe Russian-Ottoman Relations.

During the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, the balance of power between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was constantly monitored in Western Europe, where several powers had designs of their own on some of the Ottoman territories. In Germany and France, in particular, all kinds of accounts, opinions, and plans were published that were influenced by, or aimed to influence, Russian-Ottoman relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other.

Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations, but also in their effects on European public opinion.

The Global Press Archive Charter Alliance – Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers collection (Open Access)

The Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers collection traces the evolution of Mexico during this pivotal period. Comprising nearly 1,000 titles from Mexico’s pre-independence, independence and revolutionary periods (1807-1929), the newspapers in this collection provide rare documentation of the dramatic events of this era and include coverage of Mexican partisan politics, yellow press, political and social satire, as well as local, regional, national and international news. While holdings of many of the newspapers in this collection are available only in very short runs, the titles are often unique and, in many cases, represent the only existing record of a newspaper’s short-lived publication.

The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were a tumultuous time in Mexico’s history. Wars with Spain, France and the United States taxed the country’s resources and reshaped its territory, while economic depression, regional political movements and increased government repression led to the Mexican Revolution and subsequent regional and inter-regional uprisings. Political, economic and social uncertainty reigned supreme during this critical period as Mexico struggled to define itself and its relations with the world.

Most of the titles in the Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers collection are from the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, a research library at the University of Texas at Austin for area studies on Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and the Latino presence in the United States. The Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection is regarded by many as the preeminent Latin American library in the United States and is particularly rich in out-of-the-ordinary materials issued in small print runs, many difficult to acquire when first published and impossible to acquire today.

Open Access to this collection is made possible through the generous support of the Center for Research Libraries and its member institutions.

Text from the East View platform for the collection.

New E-Resource : Making of the Modern World, Part I: The Goldsmiths’-Kress Collection, 1450–1850

We are pleased to announce that Cambridge University members now have access to Making of the Modern World, Part I: The Goldsmiths’-Kress Collection, 1450–1850 via this direct link.

Please note we have only Part 1 of multiple parts.

The Making of the Modern World is an extraordinary series which covers the history of Western trade, encompassing the coal, iron, and steel industries, the railway industry, the cotton industry, banking and finance, and the emergence of the modern corporation. It is also strong in the rise of the modern labor movement, the evolving status of slavery, the condition and making of the working class, colonization, the Atlantic world, Latin American/Caribbean studies, social history, gender, and the economic theories that championed and challenged capitalism in the nineteenth century. In addition, the archive offers resources on the role of finance and taxation and the growth of the early modern monarchy. It features essential texts covering the function of financial institutions, the crisis of the French monarchy and the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century, and the connection between the democratic goals of revolutionaries and their legal aspirations.

Part I

The Making of the Modern World: Part I, The Goldsmiths’-Kress Collection, 1450-1850 offers ways of understanding the expansion of world trade, the Industrial Revolution, and the development of modern capitalism, supporting research in variety of disciplines. This collection follows the development of the modern western world through the lens of trade and wealth – the driving force behind many of the major historical events during the period (1450-1850). Users have access to an abundance of rare books and primary source materials, many of which are the only known copy of the work.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Access to this archive is enabled initially up to 31 December 2022 only.

New E-Resource : State Papers Online: Eighteenth Century, 1714-1782, Part 1

We are pleased to announce that Cambridge University members now have access to State Papers Online: Eighteenth Century, 1714-1782, Part 1 via this direct link.

Please note we have only Part 1 of multiple parts.

State Papers Online (SPO) offers a completely new working environment to researchers, teachers and students of Early Modern Britain. Whether used for original research, for teaching, or for student project work, State Papers Online offers original historical materials across the widest range of government concerns, from high level international politics and diplomacy to the charges against a steward for poisoning a dozen or more people. The correspondence, reports, memoranda, and parliamentary drafts from ambassadors, civil servants and provincial administrators present a full picture of Britain from the period of Henry VIII to the reign of George III.

This major resource overcomes the fragmented experience of much historical research by re- uniting the Domestic, Foreign, Borders, Scotland, and Ireland State Papers of Britain with the Registers of the Privy Council.

The Calendars are fully searchable, and each Calendar entry has been linked directly to its related State Paper. For series lacking Calendars, the National Archives volume-level or item- level cataloguing has been used. With these links, the difficulty of locating and identifying individual manuscripts has been substantially overcome.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Access to this archive is enabled initially up to 31 December 2022 only.

New E-Resource : Slavery and Anti-Slavery Part I-3

We are pleased to announce that Cambridge University members now have access to Slavery and Anti-Slavery Part I-3 via this direct link.

Please note we have only three of four parts published.

Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive is devoted to the study and understanding of the history of slavery in America and the rest of the world from the 17th century to the late 19th century. Archival collections were sourced from more than 60 libraries at institutions such as the Amistad Research Center, Bibliothèque nationale de France, the National Archives, Oberlin College, Oxford University, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and Yale University; these collections allow for unparalleled depth and breadth of content.

Part I: Debates over Slavery and Abolition sheds light on the abolitionist movement, the conflicts within it, the anti- and pro-slavery arguments of the period, and the debates on the subject of colonization. It explores all facets of the controversial topic, with a focus on economic, gender, legal, religious, and government issues.

Part II: Slave Trade in the Atlantic World charts the inception of slavery in Africa and its rise as perpetuated on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, placing particular emphasis on the Caribbean, Latin America, and United States. More international in scope than Part I, this collection was developed by an international editorial board with scholars specializing in North American, European, African, and Latin American/Caribbean aspects of the slave trade.

Part III: The Institution of Slavery expands the depth of coverage of the topic. Part III explores, in vivid detail, the inner workings of slavery from 1492 to 1888. Through legal documents, plantation records, first-person accounts, newspapers, government records, and other primary sources, this collection reveals how enslaved people struggled against the institution. These rare works explore slavery as a legal and labor system, the relationship between slavery and religion, freed slaves, the Shong Masacre, the Dememara insurrection, and many other aspects and events.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Access to this archive is enabled initially up to 31 December 2022 only.

New Open Access E-Resource : Black Freedom Struggle in the United States

Black Freedom Struggle in the United States is a curated selection of primary sources for teaching and learning about the struggles and triumphs of Black Americans.

black freedom-1

The Black Freedom Struggle website will include more than 2,000 documents curated around six crucial phases of the U.S. Black freedom struggle:

  • Resistance to slavery by enslaved persons and the abolitionist movement of the 19th century
  • The end of slavery during the Civil War and the Reconstruction Era
  • The fight against Jim Crow segregation
  • The New Deal and World War II
  • The Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Movement from 1946-1975
  • …and the contemporary Black experience since 1976.

This new open access website has been set up with the intention of supporting a wide range of students, independent researchers and anyone interested in learning more about the foundation of ongoing racial injustice in the US and the fights against it.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z .

New E-Resource : African Diaspora, 1860-Present

We are pleased to announce the acquisition of the  African Diaspora, 1860-Present database on the Alexander Street Press platform.

Essential for understanding Black history and culture, African Diaspora, 1860-Present allows scholars to discover the migrations, communities, and ideologies of the African Diaspora through the voices of people of African descent. With a focus on communities in the Caribbean, Brazil, India, United Kingdom, and France, the collection includes never-before digitized primary source documents, including personal papers, organizational papers, journals, newsletters, court documents, letters, and ephemera form.

After the abolition of slavery, African diasporic communities formed throughout the world. The circumstances and histories of the establishment of each community were quite different, and as a result, the experiences, cultures and ideologies of the members of these communities vary significantly.

African Diaspora, 1860-present brings these communities to life through never-before digitized primary source documents, secondary sources and videos from around the world with a focus on communities in the Caribbean, Brazil, India, United Kingdom, and France. With content from key partners like The National Archives and Records Administration (US), National Archives at Kew (UK), Royal Anthropological Institute, and Senate House Library (University of London), this first release of African Diaspora, 1860-Present offers an unparalleled view into the experiences and contributions of individuals in the Diaspora, as told through their own accounts. Future releases will include further insights into African diasporic communities with the papers of C.L.R. James, the writings of George Padmore and many more sources.

Major themes include:

  • Migrations of people of African descent to countries around the world, from the 19th century to present day.
  • Diasporic communities including Afro-Brazilian communities in Rio de Janeiro, Black British communities in London, Sidi communities in India, Afro-Caribbean communities in Trinidad, Haiti, and Cuba.
  • Movements and ideologies, including the Back to Africa movement and the Pan-African movement.

Text taken from the Alexander Street Press platform

Photo by Magda Ehlers on Pexels

Also available to access via iDiscover and the Databases A-Z .

african diaspora-1

Max Weber Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Max Weber Studies

From the journal website:

Max Weber Studies seeks an engagement with the fundamental issues in the social and historical sciences: the dilemmas of life-conduct and vocation in the contemporary world, the tracking of rationalization processes and their impact, disenchantment and the return of magic, the ‘uniqueness of the West’ and multiple modernities, the analysis of the stratification of power and its modalities, and the validity of an interpretative science of social reality. The journal asserts the continuing place of Weber in the conversation of both classical and contemporary social and cultural theory.

“The journal is an indispensable source for the translation of new Weber texts and the publication of unpublished correspondence. It offers extensive reviews of every new volume published by the Max Weber Gesamtausgabe and analyses the emerging work-history of Weber’s writings. It is very much interested in milieu analysis of European intellectual thought 1880-1920, in particular movements of social reform, the women’s movement, cultural currents, family history, the universities, and politics both nationally and internationally. The journal also undertakes the reflexive analysis of the reception of Max Weber in different language communities.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2000) to present.

Access the Max Weber Studies via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.