History Vault (ProQuest) : access to 31 May 2020

American history of the 19th and 20th century at your fingertips in millions of primary sources from ProQuest History Vault accessible to end May 2020

ProQuest History Vault unlocks the wealth of key archival materials with a single search. Researchers can access digitized letters, papers, photographs, scrapbooks, financial records, diaries, and many more primary source materials taken from the University Publications of America (UPA) Collections.

Access for Cambridge is enabled via this link

ProQuest History Vault

Please use your feedback form to tell how these archives have been useful to you.  Thank you.

Get help on using the History Vault from the History Vault LibGuide.

ProQuest History Vault first launched in 2011 and consists of manuscript and archival collections digitized in partnership and from a wide variety of archival institutions. Major collection areas in History Vault focus on the Black Freedom Movement of the 20th Century, Southern Life and Slavery, Women’s Rights, International Relations, American Politics and Society with a strong focus on the 20th Century, and labor unions, workers and radical politics in the 20th Century. On the topic of civil rights and Black Freedom, History Vault contains records of four of the most important civil rights organizations of the 1950s and 1960s: NAACP, SCLC, SNCC, and CORE.

History Vault’s collections on Slavery and Southern plantations candidly document the realities of slavery at the most immediate grassroots level in Southern society and provide some of the most revealing documentation in existence on the functioning of the slave system. Many of the collections in History Vault were originally available in microfilm from the University Publications of America (UPA) research collections and others come from the University Microfilms International (UMI) research collections with additional collections scanned from the original documents.

Horses in landscape, Franz Marc whose works are recorded in the collection Nazi Looted Art and Assets : Records on the Post-World War II Restitution Process 1942-1998

 

Society Digimap

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : SOCIETY DIGIMAP

From the  Digimap website:

Explore a range of demographic data with the newest Digimap collection. Society Digimap provides a wealth of census and socio-economic data for Great Britain. The processing required to visualise Census and other demographic datasets can be a barrier to use for many interested in the value of the datasets.

By providing these datasets as layers to visualise along with high quality Ordnance Survey data, users can access the rich information to gain valuable insights for their areas of interest without the need to learn how to use a GIS.

Now available to the University of Cambridge.

Access Society Digimap via the Databases A-Z or from the iDiscover record.

Trial access to Oxford Research Encyclopaedias

Trial access is now enabled up to 30 November 2019 for the following disciplines from Oxford Research Encyclopaedias:

African History
Education
Literature
American History
Encyclopedia of Social Work
Natural Hazard Science
Asian History
Environmental Science
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Climate Science
International Studies
Politics
Communication
Latin American History
Psychology
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Linguistics
Religion

Please tell us what you think about these e-resources by completing the feedback form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Nation Digital Archive: trial access until 30th April 2019

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to The Nation Digital Archive on the EBSCOhost platform.

Enjoy an unparalleled history of The Nation featuring thousands of historic articles, letters and editorials dating back to 1865.

It’s a unique and fascinating journey through America’s past, including exact page images as they originally appeared, led by giants like…George Bernard Shaw, Margaret Bourke-White, Emily Dickinson, E.L. Doctorow, John Dos Passos, Robert Frost, Arthur Miller, Sylvia Plath, James Thurber and Kurt Vonnegut, in their own words.

The full page views are available as PDF downloads.

Access is enabled until 30th April 2019.  Please send us your feedback via the online form here.

Early Medieval Europe – archive access

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Early Medieval Europe

From the Wiley website for the journal:

Early Medieval Europe provides an indispensable source of information and debate on the history of Europe from the later Roman Empire to the eleventh century. The journal is a thoroughly interdisciplinary forum, encouraging the discussion of archaeology, numismatics, palaeography, diplomatic, literature, onomastics, art history, linguistics and epigraphy, as well as more traditional historical approaches. It covers Europe in its entirety, including material on Iceland, Ireland, the British Isles, Scandinavia and Continental Europe (both west and east). Early Medieval Europe is unique in its chronological, methodological and geographical scope. Filling an important gap, it is indispensable reading for all students and scholars of the early medieval world.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (1992) to present.

Access Early Medieval Europe via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “medieval bronze caster” by Hans Splinter on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/4PBSPU

Contention: the multidisciplinary journal of social protest

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Contention : the multidisciplinary journal of social protest.

From the publisher website for the journal:

Contention is dedicated to research on and about social protest and political behavior. The journal advances essential knowledge of a comprehensive range of collective actions, social movements, and other forms of political and social contention. By providing a multidiscipinary forum to scholars within and across the social sciences and humanities, it seeks to promote scholarly exchange and knowledge sharing among them.

While recognizing the importance of the contribution that the increasing specialization of knowledge has brought to the understanding of political behavior and collective action, Contention aims to reconstruct the fragmentation of the scientific discourse by offering in each issue a coherent but diversified range of articles from different theoretical, methodological, and philosophical approaches.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2013) to present.

Access Contention via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: Gratisography

History of Humanities

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : History of Humanities.

From the University of Chicago Press website for the journal:

History of Humanities, along with the newly formed Society for the History of the Humanities, takes as its subject the history of a wide variety of disciplines including archaeology, art history, historiography, linguistics, literary studies, musicology, philology, and media studies, tracing these fields from their earliest developments, through their formalization into university disciplines, and to the modern day.

“By exploring the history of humanities across time and civilizations and along with their socio-political and epistemic implications, the journal takes a critical look at the concept of humanities itself.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2016) to present.

Access History of Humanities via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.