Max Weber Studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Max Weber Studies

From the journal website:

Max Weber Studies seeks an engagement with the fundamental issues in the social and historical sciences: the dilemmas of life-conduct and vocation in the contemporary world, the tracking of rationalization processes and their impact, disenchantment and the return of magic, the ‘uniqueness of the West’ and multiple modernities, the analysis of the stratification of power and its modalities, and the validity of an interpretative science of social reality. The journal asserts the continuing place of Weber in the conversation of both classical and contemporary social and cultural theory.

“The journal is an indispensable source for the translation of new Weber texts and the publication of unpublished correspondence. It offers extensive reviews of every new volume published by the Max Weber Gesamtausgabe and analyses the emerging work-history of Weber’s writings. It is very much interested in milieu analysis of European intellectual thought 1880-1920, in particular movements of social reform, the women’s movement, cultural currents, family history, the universities, and politics both nationally and internationally. The journal also undertakes the reflexive analysis of the reception of Max Weber in different language communities.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2000) to present.

Access the Max Weber Studies via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

New E-Resource : Black Newspaper Collection (ProQuest Historical Newspapers)

The University of Cambridge has acquired the Black Newspaper Collection from Proquest.

This collection offers essential primary source content and editorial perspectives of the most distinguished African American newspapers in the U.S. Each of the ten Historical Black Newspapers provides researchers with unprecedented access to perspectives and information that was excluded or marginalized in mainstream sources. The content, including articles, obituaries, photos, editorials, and more, is easily accessible for scholars in the study of the history of race relations, journalism, local and national politics, education, African American studies, and many multidisciplinary subjects. Examine major movements from the Harlem Renaissance to Civil Rights, and explore everyday life as written in the Chicago DefenderThe Baltimore Afro-AmericanNew York Amsterdam NewsPittsburgh CourierLos Angeles SentinelAtlanta Daily WorldThe Norfolk Journal and GuideThe Philadelphia TribuneCleveland Call and Post, and Michigan Chronicle.

Each of the ten Historical Black Newspapers are cross-searchable with all other ProQuest Historical Newspapers–including The New York TimesChicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times and The Guardian–allowing researchers to evaluate history from multiple points view from various places throughout the world.

The ProQuest platform offers powerful and easy-to-use tools, including complete cover to cover full-page and article images in easily downloadable PDF format, and the ability to search many different article types.

Atlanta Daily World (1931-2010)

Baltimore Afro-American  (1893-1988)

Chicago Defender (1909-2010)

Cleveland Call and Post (1934-1962); Call and Post (1962-1991)

Los Angeles Sentinel  (1934-2005)

Michigan Chronicle

New York Amsterdam News (1922-1993)

Norfolk Journal and Guide (1916-2003)

Philadelphia Tribune (1912-2001)

Pittsburgh Courier (1911-2010)

Also available to access via iDiscover and the Databases A-Z .

black newspaper collection-1

Art show takes visitors to Mali village: N. Y. exhibit has spiritual tone. Roth, Katherine.  Philadelphia Tribune (1912-2001); Philadelphia, Penn. [Philadelphia, Penn]. 30 Dec 2001: 1_D. 

HathiTrust ETAS collection access now available

Any print book held in the University Library that is available as a digitised book on HathiTrust can now be read on their platform. Access is made available to simultaneous users only when multiple copies of the book are available in print. If one copy of a book is available in the print  collection of the University Library HathiTrust will allow one person at a time to view the digitised copy.

Access is available by logging into the HathiTrust platform with Raven.

This is a temporary service only available for the pandemic. Under the terms of the special emergency arrangement access to books on the platform will be withdrawn when restrictions to accessing the print collections are removed.

The Emergency Temporary Access Service (ETAS) makes it possible for authorized member library patrons to obtain lawful access to specific materials in the corpus, specifically digitised items in HathiTrust that correspond to physical books held by their own library when that book is not currently available due to the temporary disruption in service.

Not every book will be available to view in full. You will see that some books are marked ‘Limited (search-only)’. These books are not included in our ETAS collection as we do not hold print copies of these titles (please check iDiscover for an electronic version of the title). Titles in our collection will include a link marked ‘Temporary Access’. The ‘Full View’ records will be out of copyright texts that will remain available after our ETAS access ends.

The books that are available for ‘Temporary Access’ will be available to link from iDiscover records for the print title: https://idiscover.lib.cam.ac.uk/permalink/f/t9gok8/44CAM_ALMA51660935800003606

HathiTrust is a not-for-profit collaborative of 200+ academic and research libraries, preserving 17.4+ million digitised items. HathiTrust holds the largest set of digitized books managed by the academic, research, and library community.

Information about ETAS is available from the HathiTrust website: https://www.hathitrust.org/ETAS-User-Information

To view the HathiTrust Statement of Accessibility please see this page: https://www.hathitrust.org/accessibility

New eresources: Early American Imprints – Evans

Three Readex Early American Imprints databases have been acquired from the legacy of Dr. Mark Kaplanoff, Fellow of Pembroke College, who endowed the University Library with funds to support the study of the history of the United States in the University of Cambridge.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800, has been hailed as the definitive resource for teaching and researching nearly every aspect of 17th- and 18th-century America. This incomparable digital collection contains virtually every book, pamphlet and broadside published in America over a 160-year period. Providing complete digital editions of nearly 38,000 printed works, Series I covers subjects ranging from history, literature and culture to politics, government and society.

Early American Imprints, Series I, is comprised of a vast range of publication types. Among the genres included are advertisements, allegories, almanacs, autobiographies, ballads, bibles, captivity narratives, cookbooks, diaries, elegies, eulogies, hymns, imaginary voyages, narratives, novels, operas, plays, poems, primers, sermons, songs, speeches, textbooks, tracts, travel literature and many others.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Supplement from the Library Company of Philadelphia, 1670-1800

Fully integrated with Early American Imprints: Evans, this Supplement includes items that are relevant to a host of humanities topics and are representative of numerous genres of colonial print, many emanating from the middle and lower orders of society. The fragile bound books, as a result of their popularity, are generally unknown today because they were read repeatedly until they disintegrated. Among these are guide books to the perplexities of life, which served to shape individual and community identities. The pamphlets, often containing writing of considerable significance, present sermons, religious tracts, political arguments, reports of organized bodies and other influential items. The broadsides—which capture a slice of life, unedited for posterity— include doggerel ballads, advertisements, official decrees, news extras, amateur elegies and more.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Supplement from the American Antiquarian Society, 1652-1800

This extensive collection is comprised entirely of works that fall into the scope of the original Evans and Bristol bibliographies (which formed the basis of Early American Imprints, Series 1: Evans, 1639-1800) but were either missed by Evans and Bristol, or were listed by Evans and Bristol but could not be found until now. For today’s students and scholars of early America, no other collection offers the opportunity to view previously unknown publications from the first 150 years of American history. Broad subject areas covered by these works include the Atlantic World, Cartography, Colonial History, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, Literature, Music, Revolutionary War and Sociology. The materials cover a wide range of important document types: histories, personal narratives, military records, government acts, expedition logs, treaties, maps, almanacs, children’s primers, criminal confessions, recipe books, poems, songs and speeches.

Records will be made available in iDiscover for titles in this collections.

Image credit Image by Michal Jarmoluk from Pixabay

 

New eresource: Native American Indians, 1645-1819

The Readex Native American Indians, 1645-1819 database has been acquired from the legacy of Dr. Mark Kaplanoff, Fellow of Pembroke College, who endowed the University Library with funds to support the study of the history of the United States in the University of Cambridge.

By the late 17th century, Britain had established colonies along the New England coast and Chesapeake Bay, alongside small groups of Dutch and Swedish settlers. Many of the region’s Indigenous inhabitants were pushed West, where they joined hundreds of other tribes whose lives were irrevocably changed by the arrival of Europeans. Likewise, the presence of Native Americans influenced almost every element of early American settler life, and an enormous number of books were printed about this relationship over the next century and a half. Every major book about Native Peoples from this period is included in Native American Indians, 1645-1819. This product also offers text analysis tools, author biographies, and suggested search paths for easy browsing and discovery.

A comprehensive record of Native America
The documents in Native American Indians, 1645-1819, include treaties, transcribed letters from Native American leaders, the minutes of tribal meetings, histories of numerous tribes, missionary reports, captivity narratives, firsthand accounts of battles, trading records, military rosters, expedition logs and maps, trial records, legislative bills, books on Native American languages and grammar, military rosters, governors’ and legislators’ reports, ballads, songs, plays and more. While such documents are invaluable for scholars and students of Native American studies and early American history, they also offer insight into numerous other fields, including natural history, border studies, military history, political science and linguistics. Additionally, a suite of tools aimed specifically at the Digital Humanities provides word frequencies, keywords in context and other functions that bring this unique content to life in ways never before possible.

Foundational works for understanding Native history
The documents in Native American Indians, 1645-1819, are derived from the holdings of the American Antiquarian Society, Library Company of Philadelphia and many other institutions. Among the seminal works included in this collection are “The Conference with the Eastern Indians, at the ratification of the peace…in July and August 1726,” “A Bill to Authorize the President of the United States to select such tribes of Indians as he may think best prepared for the change, and to adopt such means as he may judge expedient in order to civilize the same,” “Travels and adventures in Canada and the Indian territories between the years 1760 and 1776…” “A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians…,” “A history of the voyages and adventures of John Van Delure. Giving an account of his being left on the N.W. coast of America…where he lived almost seven years and married the daughter of an Indian chief,” and more than 1,500 others.

Records will be made available in iDiscover for titles in this collection.

New eresources: African newspapers collections

Access to four Readex newspaper archives are now available to members of the University of Cambridge. Acquisition of the archives has been made possible thanks to funding from the University to support teaching, learning, and research in African Studies.

The new archives available from Readex are:

African Newspapers 1, 1800-1922

This groundbreaking online collection provides more than 60 searchable African newspapers published in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Featuring English- and foreign-language titles from Angola, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe, African Newspapers offers unparalleled coverage of the issues and events that shaped the continent and its peoples between 1800 and 1922.

African Newspapers 2, 1835-1925

Expanding the coverage found in the inaugural edition of African Newspapers, this second series delivers 40 additional African newspapers published between 1835 and 1925. Featuring English- and foreign-language titles from Algeria, Angola, Liberia, Madagascar, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda, African Newspapers, Series 2, offers deep and unique coverage of the issues and events that shaped the continent and its peoples during this period of major change.

African Newspapers: The British Library Collection

African Newspapers: The British Library Collection features nearly 60 newspapers from across the African continent, all published before 1900. Originally archived by the British Library these rare historical documents are now available for the first time in a fully searchable online collection. From culture to history to geopolitics, the pages of these newspapers offer fresh research opportunities for students and scholars interested in topics related to Africa.

Among the many rare and essential in this series are the Egyptian Gazette (Cairo), Journal Franco-Ethiopien (Djibouti); Central African Times (Blantyre, Malawi), Commercial Gazette (Port Louis, Mauritius), Times of Marocco (Morocco), St. Helena Guardian (Jamestown, St. Helena) and Express en Oranjevrijstaatsch Advertentieblad (Bloemfontein, South Africa).

Rand Daily Mail, Johannesburg, SA (1902-1985)

The Rand Daily Mail, published daily in Johannesburg, is a critically important title that pioneered popular journalism in South Africa.

The Rand Daily Mail is of great value to students and scholars, opening exciting new pathways to research a turbulent period in history. Its archives are rich with insight into events related to South Africa’s struggle for freedom and democracy, covered in fascinating detail by a group of daring and talented journalists. Examples include Benjamin Pogrund’s extraordinary coverage of the Sharpeville massacre in 1960; Helen Zille’s uncovering of Steve Biko’s murder at the hands of police in 1977 investigative reporting by Mervyn Rees and Chris Day about the Department of Information’s effort to influence opinion, an exposé that sparked the scandal known as “Muldergate”; and many others. Rand Daily Mailcontinued to be popular among progressive readers until—after adopting an outspoken anti-apartheid stance amid a massive clampdown by security forces—it was controversially closed in 1985.

Records will be made available in iDiscover for titles in this collections.

Text taken from the Readex platform.

Image credit Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

British Library 19th Century Collection now freely accessible on Historical Texts

The British Library 19th Century Collection is now freely available to search on the JISC Historical Texts platform.

We do not have a direct link to the collection on Historical Texts, but you can use this link https://historicaltexts.jisc.ac.uk/results?collection=bl&size=120 to browse the collection using the Advanced Search function.

In partnership with Microsoft, the British Library has digitised, and made freely available under Public Domain Mark, over 60,000 volumes (around 25 million pages) of out of copyright 18th & 19th century texts. Items within this collection cover a wide range of subject areas including geography, philosophy, history, poetry and literature and are published in a variety of languages.

A title list for the collection is available to download.

This presentation given by Adrian Edwards, Lead Curator Printed Historical Sources, provides an overview of the selection process that shaped this digitisation.

Titles in the collection include:

Wives and daughters. An every-day story … With eighteen illustrations by George Du Maurier. volume 1 and volume 2 by Elizabeth Gaskell

The Nautical Gazetteer; or, Dictionary of maritime geography, etc. by Henry Hurst, etc.

Notes of a Two Years Residence in Italy by Hamilton Gaele

Descriptive and historical notices of some remarkable Northumbrian Castles, Churches and Antiquities, in a series of visits to the ruined Priory of Finchale, the Abbey Church of Hexham, etc. With biographical notices of eminent persons. Series 1. by William Sidney Gibson

New e-resource: Archives Unbound

From gender studies to political science, from American history to the African Diaspora, from the Middle East to the Industrial Revolution, Archives Unbound offers a mass of digital archives for historical studies in Cambridge.

Cambridge University now has access to all digital archives in the Archives Unbound resource from Gale Cengage.

The Archives Unbound programme contains more than 250 collections and new archives are continually added to the portfolio. The roots of the programme are in microfilm, and the collection makes available targeted collections of interest to scholars engaged in serious research.

Particular strengths in the Archives Unbound catalogue include: U.S. foreign policy; U.S. civil rights; global affairs and colonial studies; and modern history.

Broad topic clusters include: African American studies; American Indian studies; Asian studies; British history; Holocaust studies; LGBTQ studies; Latin American and Caribbean studies; Middle East studies; political science; religious studies; and women’s studies.

Archives Unbound programme currently consists of more than 290,000 documents totalling 12 million pages. Individual titles in the collection range between 1,200 and 200,000 pages.

The digital archives in Archives Unbound have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

Journal of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association

From the Indiana University Press website:

Founded in 1976 (as the Turkish Studies Association Bulletin), each issue of the Journal of Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association contains the latest scholarship on the Ottoman Empire and Republic of Turkey, and includes state of the field essays, book reviews and review articles that examine the wide ranging studies that cross disciplinary, national, ethnic, imperial, periodized, religious, geographic, and linguistic boundaries and take as their focus the diversity of peoples, influences, approaches, times, and regions that make up the Turkish and former Ottoman worlds.

“The Journal of Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association is published semiannually by the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2014) to present.

Access the Journal of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image by Evren Ozdemir from Pixabay

Black Newspaper Collection (ProQuest Historical Newspapers) : access until 21 October 2020

The University of Cambridge now has trial access until 21 October 2020 to the Black Newspaper Collection 

Please send your feedback using the online form.

ProQuest Historical Black Newspapers offer essential primary source content and editorial perspectives of the most distinguished African American newspapers in the U.S. Each of the ten Historical Black Newspapers provides researchers with unprecedented access to perspectives and information that was excluded or marginalized in mainstream sources. The content, including articles, obituaries, photos, editorials, and more, is easily accessible for scholars in the study of the history of race relations, journalism, local and national politics, education, African American studies, and many multidisciplinary subjects. Examine major movements from the Harlem Renaissance to Civil Rights, and explore everyday life as written in the Chicago DefenderThe Baltimore Afro-AmericanNew York Amsterdam NewsPittsburgh CourierLos Angeles SentinelAtlanta Daily WorldThe Norfolk Journal and GuideThe Philadelphia TribuneCleveland Call and Post, and Michigan Chronicle.

Each of the ten Historical Black Newspapers are cross-searchable with all other ProQuest Historical Newspapers–including The New York TimesChicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times and The Guardian–allowing researchers to evaluate history from multiple points view from various places throughout the world.

The ProQuest platform offers powerful and easy-to-use tools, including complete cover to cover full-page and article images in easily downloadable PDF format, and the ability to search many different article types.

Michigan Chronicle

Chicago Defender

Pittsburgh Courier

LA Sentinel

Norfolk Journal and Guide

Cleveland Call and Post

New York Amsterdam News

The Baltimore Afro-American

Atlanta Daily World

The Philadelphia Tribune

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.