Duke Mathematical Journal backfile

New e-journal backfile access: Duke Mathematical Journal (DMJ100)

Published since its inception in 1935 by Duke University Press, the Duke Mathematical Journal is one of the world’s leading mathematical journals. In 2013, the Institute for Scientific Information awarded DMJ an impact factor of 1.724, making it one of the top ten journals in the field. DMJ emphasizes the most active and influential areas of current mathematics.

Access the Duke Mathematical Journal via this link.

Nobel Prize-winner John F. Nash whose Nobel seminar the DMJ published and for whom the DMJ published an honorary volume.

New journal backfiles in Social policy, Social welfare, and Anthropology

Cambridge University Library has acquired journal backfiles in the subject areas of Social policy, Social welfare, and Anthropology.  The titles are currently published by Wiley-Blackwell but were formerly published by Blackwell Publishing, university presses and anthropological societies.

All the titles are listed in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z and will be retrievable in Library Search by mid-November 2014.

The collection comprises 16 titles (see below) and just over 90,000 pages of articles, in one of which Professor Adam Kuper of the LSE (in ‘Post-modernism, Cambridge and the great Kalahari debate’, Social anthropology, vol. 1, issue 1, 1992, p. 57-71) remembers Cambridge anthropology:

“I fetched up in King’s College, Cambridge, in 1962, at the age of twenty, as a research student in social anthropology. This was still very much the pre-modern Cambridge, and for a young foreigner it was exotic and more than a little unnerving. …

The department of social anthropology presented special problems. There was no instruction in the methods of fieldwork by participant observation. This provoked a certain nervousness as the moment approached to depart for the field. We began to solicit instruction. Several of us were about to leave for Africa, New Guinea, Madagascar, Mexico . . . Couldn’t we be given some guidance about procedures?

At last Jack Goody consented to talk to us. We met in his room in St John’s College one evening in the early summer, after dinner. My image of that occasion is still vivid, for there was a May Ball at St John’s that night, and we slipped into Goody’s rooms past young men in evening dress and young women in décolletée silk gowns; and while we sat talking we could hear the dance music across the lawn. This was the image of England which haunted Edwardian travellers as they dressed for solitary dinners in deserts and jungles. However, we did not, I am afraid, learn a great deal directly that evening. Jack Goody explained that there was no real method, nothing that could be taught. The important things to bear in mind were that one had to remain healthy and on good terms with the authorities, and keep duplicates of one’s notes, sending copies home as often as possible.”

For your information now, the titles are listed below:

Australian journal of anthropology
Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology
Child & family social work
Children & society
Gender, Work & Organization
Health & social care in the community
International journal of Japanese sociology
International Social Security Review
Journal of Historical Sociology
Mankind
Scandinavian journal of social welfare
Social and economic administration
Social anthropology
Social policy & administration
Sociologia Ruralis
Sociological Inquiry

New journal backfiles for Politics

Cambridge University Library is delighted to announce the new acquisition of journal backfiles in the subject area of Politics.  The titles are currently published by Wiley-Blackwell but were formerly published by Blackwell Publishing, university presses and institutes and associations of political science.

All the titles are listed in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z and will be retrievable in Library Search by mid-November 2014.

From Sir Gwilym Gibbon, ‘The Civil Service and the War‘, Public Administration, 18:4, 219-289, one of the titles in the collection:

“There is, of course, behind all this an even greater problem, tragically illustrated by the present titanic struggle of war-whether, and how, man can match the fertility of his discoveries and inventions in material things with a similar fertility in the adaptation of himself and his institutions to the new conditions, or whether he must stay the pace of his mastery over the material to the slower progress of himself, in his character, outlook and habits. It must suffice here to say that it seems doubtful whether the slackening of the pace of advances in the material world is possible without reverting to a lower level of civilisation, which would happen if Hitler and his crowd were victorious, and that, if freedom is to prevail, man can scarcely resist the challenge of his opportunities and must ‘labour to find means by which the pace of advance in his own make-up, in the individual and in the group, shall keep reasonable step with that of his material conquests. This is one of the basic crises of our civilisation.”

The old Chamber of the House of Commons built by Sir Charles Barry was destroyed by German bombs during the Second World War. The essential features of Barry’s design were preserved when the Chamber was rebuilt.

For your information now, the titles are listed below:

Australian journal of public administration
Canadian Public Administration
Constellations
European Journal of Political Research
Governance
Government and Opposition
GPSA journal
Journal of Common Market Studies
Journal of contingencies and crisis management
Journal of public administration (London, England)
Middle East Policy
Nations and Nationalism
New Economy
Pacific Focus
Peace & change
Policy Studies Journal
Policy Studies Review
Political Quarterly
Political Studies
Politics
Public administration
Public administration (Sydney)
Scandinavian Political Studies
Southeastern political review

New journal backfiles for Philosophy

Cambridge University Library is delighted to announce the new acquisition of journal backfiles in the subject area of Philosophy.  The titles are currently published by Wiley-Blackwell but were formerly published by Blackwell Publishing, university presses and philosophical foundations.

All the titles are listed in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z and will be retrievable in Library Search by mid-November 2014.

“Thus being the 16.05 from Cambridge to Liverpool Street is a purely syntactic property – it is  determined by the rule that says that any wft [well-formed train] that leaves Cambridge at (approximately) 16.05 and arrives at Liverpool Street at 17.09 is, by “theoretical definition”, the 16.05 from Cambridge to Liverpool Street.  Naturally, to infer rules from the somewhat rought and ready actual behaviour of the system will require much careful study and idealisation – but who ever thought train science would be easy? … What makes [this analogy] absurd is the idea that there is anything syntactic about this causal system at all.  To hold that it is syntactic involves a trivialisation of the idea of syntax, rendering it useless for distinguising between the causal structure of the mind and that of Network South-East … Why should we suppose that the mind has syntactic structure?” Tim Crane, ‘The Language of Thought: no Syntax without Semantics‘, Mind & Language, 5 (1990), 187-212.  DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0017.1990.tb00159.x

For your information now, the titles are listed below:

Bioethics

Dialectica

European Journal of Philosophy

Hastings Center Report

Hypatia

International review of mission

Journal of Applied Philosophy

Journal of Chinese Philosophy

Journal of political philosophy

Journal of Social Philosophy

Metaphilosophy

Midwest Studies In Philosophy

Mind & language

National teaching & learning forum

Philosophical Books

Philosophical Investigations

RATIO

Southern Journal of Philosophy

Theoria

Join the conversation: Listen to : Philosophy as Dialogue.

Philosophy has always thrived on discussion. Socratic dialogue remains at its heart. Dr Nigel Warburton explores some of the great philosophical dialogues as well as the broader significance of critical debate in philosophy. Recorded at the Cambridge Alumni weekend Saturday 27th September 2014.

While for others it became a Norwegian exile.

Wittgenstein’s hut above the Eidsvatn in Skjolden, Norway

Follow Nigel Warburton on Twitter

Follow Tim Crane on Twitter

 

SAGE Backfile : 1879-1998

The University Library is delighted to announce access has been purchased in perpetuity for the University of Cambridge to the prestigious journal backfiles of all titles published by SAGE. This represents a major addition to the already extensive journal backfiles available online to the University and will deepen and help facilitate research and teaching across multiple disciplines.

The SAGE backfile comprises over 460 journals, including more than 570,000 articles of historical content, covering subjects in business, humanities, social science, and science, technology and medicine.  Access runs from the first issue (back as early as 1879) up to 1998, after which year Cambridge enjoys access to the current issues of SAGE journals via the University Journals Coordination Scheme’s subscription to the SAGE Premier journal package.  70% of the journals in the SAGE backfile are ranked in the 2012 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports.

Access the SAGE backfile journals via the “SAGE Deep Backfile Package 2014” links in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z gateway.  For a list of the titles in the SAGE backfile see this spreadsheet SAGE Deep Backfile Package 2014 full title list.

What is the journal with the earliest content in the archive, then?  It’s the The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health (later to be called Perspectives in Public Health) where in the earliest issue, of 1879, W. Ogle opined on “Nurses: How to Make Them, How to Use Them, How to Pay Them”: “As Mrs Nightingale well says, probationers must be sober, honest, truthful, trustworthy, punctual, quiet and orderly, cleanly and neat, patient, cheerful, and kindly, and to these qualifications let me add that they should be Christians with a single eye.”  Two years earlier the St John’s Ambulance Association had been formed (its bandages in a fabric design from Flickr by Jane McDevitt below), of which Ogle later discusses the classes (refusing them in Derby, where that singleness of purpose he asks for in nurses is all the more necessary “in this way you escape both Scylla and Charybdis”).