Canadian Journal of Chemistry

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Canadian Journal of Chemistry 

From the NRC Research Press website for the journal:

“Published since 1929, this monthly journal reports current research findings in all branches of chemistry. It includes the traditional areas of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical-theoretical chemistry and newer interdisciplinary areas such as materials science, spectroscopy, chemical physics, and biological, medicinal and environmental chemistry as well as research in chemistry education.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 76 (1998) to present. Volume 29 (1951) to volume 75 (1997) are available as Open Access.

Access Canadian Journal of Chemistry via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: by jarmoluk on Pixabay – https://pixabay.com/en/laboratory-analysis-chemistry-2815641/

Journal of Scottish Philosophy

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Scottish Philosophy

From the Edinburgh University Press website for the journal:

“The Journal of Scottish Philosophy (JSP) publishes innovative work by philosophers and historians of ideas on all aspects and every period of the Scottish philosophical tradition – philosophical psychology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, ethics and moral philosophy, political and social theory, from the late scholastics of the 15th century through the 18th century Enlightenment philosophers to the Scottish Idealists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It has a special interest in the writings of Thomas Reid, and in the influence and impact of Scottish philosophy on the foundations of theology and education in North America.

“The journal is international in scope. Its referees are drawn from experts across the world, and it regularly includes contributions from philosophers and scholars in Britain, continental Europe, Canada, the United States, Japan and South America. In addition to the publication of substantial articles, the Reviews Section provides critical notices of both important new monographs and new editions of the works of major Scottish philosophers.”

“Published by Edinburgh University Press on behalf of the Center for the Study of Scottish Philosophy, one of three research centres based at Princeton Theological Seminary.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2003) to present.

Access Journal of Scottish Philosophy via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “October Phtotograph David Hume Statue Edinburgh Scotland” by Sandy Stevenson on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/8CRHcR

Linguistic Variation

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Linguistic Variation

From the John Benjamins website for the journal:

Linguistic Variation (LV) is an international, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the theoretical study of linguistic variation. It seeks to investigate to what extent the study of linguistic variation can shed light on the broader issue of language-particular versus language-universal properties, on the interaction between what is fixed and necessary on the one hand and what is variable and contingent on the other. This enterprise involves properly defining and delineating the notion of linguistic variation, identifying possible loci of variation, investigating what the variable properties of natural language reveal about its underlying invariant core, and conversely, exploring the range and type of variation that arises from the interaction between several invariant principles.

“Empirically, these issues can be investigated on the level of both intra- and interlinguistic differences, of closely related languages (microvariation, dialectology) and larger typological groups (macrovariation). Theoretically, these questions can be addressed from the point of view of syntax, morphology, phonology, phonetics, acquisition, psycholinguistics and semantics.

“Linguistic Variation aims to provide a forum for the discussion of these and related topics. It welcomes both empirically and theoretically oriented papers that further our understanding of linguistic variation by relating patterns of variation to the organization of the language faculty.

Now available to the University of  Cambridge electronically from volume 18 (2018) to present.

Access Linguistic Variation via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

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Early Medieval Europe – archive access

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Early Medieval Europe

From the Wiley website for the journal:

Early Medieval Europe provides an indispensable source of information and debate on the history of Europe from the later Roman Empire to the eleventh century. The journal is a thoroughly interdisciplinary forum, encouraging the discussion of archaeology, numismatics, palaeography, diplomatic, literature, onomastics, art history, linguistics and epigraphy, as well as more traditional historical approaches. It covers Europe in its entirety, including material on Iceland, Ireland, the British Isles, Scandinavia and Continental Europe (both west and east). Early Medieval Europe is unique in its chronological, methodological and geographical scope. Filling an important gap, it is indispensable reading for all students and scholars of the early medieval world.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (1992) to present.

Access Early Medieval Europe via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “medieval bronze caster” by Hans Splinter on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/4PBSPU

Journal of Language and Politics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Language and Politics

From the John Benjamins website for the journal:

“The Journal of Language and Politics (JLP) represents an interdisciplinary and critical forum for analysing and discussing the various dimensions in the interplay between language and politics. It locates at the intersection of several social science disciplines including communication and media research, linguistics, discourse studies, political science, political sociology or political psychology. It focuses mainly on the empirically-founded research on the role of language and wider communication in all social processes and dynamics that can be deemed as political. Its focus is therefore not limited to the ’institutional’ field of politics or to the traditional channels of political communication but extends to a wide range of social fields, actions and media (incl. traditional and online) where political and politicised ideas are linguistically and discursively constructed and communicated.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 17 (2018) to present.

Access Journal of Language and Politics via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “Prime Minister Theresa May” by Number 10 on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/Vnii9D

History of Humanities

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : History of Humanities.

From the University of Chicago Press website for the journal:

History of Humanities, along with the newly formed Society for the History of the Humanities, takes as its subject the history of a wide variety of disciplines including archaeology, art history, historiography, linguistics, literary studies, musicology, philology, and media studies, tracing these fields from their earliest developments, through their formalization into university disciplines, and to the modern day.

“By exploring the history of humanities across time and civilizations and along with their socio-political and epistemic implications, the journal takes a critical look at the concept of humanities itself.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2016) to present.

Access History of Humanities via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Linguistische Berichte

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Linguistische Berichte.

From the Ingenta Connect website for the journal:

“”Linguistische Berichte” is open-minded regarding linguistic subjects and methods, but attaches great importance to theoretical reasoning and empirical validation.

“Since its foundation in 1969 by Peter Hartmann and Arnim von Stechow, the journal is an academic forum where serious views within linguistics and similar fields of studies (psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition and teaching, literary studies, philosophy, and computer linguistics) are discussed equally.

“The purpose is to provide an objective and critical documentation of linguistic developments. Besides, the forum is open for each level of scientific work, i.e. for everyone who is dealing with linguistic-based work (undergraduates, assistants, and professors).”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from number 205 (2006) to present.

Access Linguistische Berichte via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Words’ by Pierre Metivier on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/28jsA1