Journal of the Polynesian Society

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of the Polynesian Society


From the journal website:

Journal of the Polynesian Society [publishes] papers from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the past and present lives and cultures of peoples of Pacific/Oceanic heritage, including those of the traditional cultural areas of Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia. This includes submissions in the areas of social anthropology, archaeology, ethnology, history, museum and material culture studies, Māori and Pacific Studies, linguistics and biological anthropology. The Journal is published quarterly and includes main articles (typically between 7000-10,000 words), shorter communications (4000 words or less), correspondence and book reviews.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from the journal website from volume 121 (2012) to present. Access from vol 1 (1892) to volume 122 (2013) from the JSTOR platform.

Access Journal of the Polynesian Society via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘French Polynesia’ by Klaquetes on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/5KmqtG

Semitica et Classica

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Semitica et classica.

From the Brepols website for the journal:

“Semitica et Classica,  International Journal of Oriental and Mediterranean Studies, led by specialists in Eastern Mediterranean studies, philologists, archaeologists, epigraphists, philosophers, historians and linguists is directed to researchers with a particular interest in these areas of learning. The journal publishes work related to the interaction between the classical and Oriental worlds from the second millennium B.C.E. to the early centuries of Islam. The cultural area covered by the journal stretches from the western Mediterranean to the Middle East and includes Europe, Africa, and Asia up to and including the Arabian peninsula.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2008) to present.

Access Semitica et Classica via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Image 0096’ by Richard Kendall on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/79QRVG

Annual Reviews upgrade

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : extra titles added to the Annual reviews sciences collection.

 

Eight extra titles have been added to the Annual Reviews Sciences Collection, meaning that the University now has access to all 44 titles back to the first volume. The new titles cover Linguistics, Vision science, Chemical & biomolecular engineering, Food science and technology, Animal biosciences, Organizational psychology & organizational behavior, Virology and Cancer biology.

Access the new titles via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z.

 

Hispanofila

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Hispanofila.

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From the Project Muse website for the journal:

“Hispanófila, a journal that accepts essays on any literary, linguistic, or cultural topic dealing with the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking worlds, appears three times a year. Articles may be written in English, Spanish, or Portuguese. Only work that has not been previously published is considered for publication with Hispanófila. The journal, founded by Professor Alva V. Ebersole, was brought to the Department of Romance Languages at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1968.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 151 (2008) to present.

Access Hispanofila via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Mittel-America und Westindien’ by Norman B. Leventhal Map Centre on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/5KHWNv

International Journal of American Linguistics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : International Journal of American Linguistics.

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From the University of Chicago Press website for the journal:

“The International Journal of American Linguistics (IJAL) is dedicated to the documentation and analysis of the indigenous languages of the Americas. Founded by Franz Boas and Pliny Earle Goddard in 1917, the journal focuses on the linguistics of American Indigenous languages. IJAL is an important repository for research based on field work and archival materials on the languages of North and South America. “

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 69 (2003) to present.

Access International Journal of American Linguistics via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link. For access to volume 1 (1917) to volume 79 (2013) you can also use this link to JSTOR.

Image credit: ‘Under Your Spell’ by Thomas Hawk on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/o2THMm

Zeitschrift für Slawistik

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Zeitschrift für Slawistik.

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From the de Gruyter website for the journal:

“The Journal founded in 1956, as a professional journal for German and international Slavic research, publishes critical essays on languages and literatures, on popular poetry and on the cultural history of Slavic peoples in the past and present. Special attention is paid to German-Slavic linguistics, literary and cultural relations within their European context, to onomastics, history and poetology of literary genres, Baltic studies, Sorbian studies, and to the history of Slavic studies. Literary reports and reviews give an insight into current tendencies and developments in international Slavonic research. Conference proceedings provide information about important academic events.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 40 (1995) to present.

Access Zeitschrift für Slawistik via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Slavic joy’ by Avisionn Photo on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/d7X8nA

Journal of historical sociolinguistics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : journal of historical sociolinguistics

The Journal’s Aims and Scope:

The Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics (JHSL) is a double-blind peer-reviewed forum for research into the social history of language. We welcome original contributions (both linguistic and interdisciplinary) on aspects of language and society in the past including (but not limited to) the social embedding of language variation and change, issues of language contact and conflict, historical multilingualism, the social stratification of writing skills, the development of language norms and the impact of language ideologies.

Published by Walter de Gruyter.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2015) to present.

Access Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics via this link.

Image: Muchachos trepando a un árbol, Francisco de Goya.

Salvador Tió … wove the threads between academic and popular discourses. In the 1940s, he coined the term espanglish which is still the lightning rod in the language debates over diasporic Spanish-speaking communities in the US. Tió mocked the lexical and morpho-syntactic results of linguistic contact by making up nonsense Spanglish items such as treepar combining the English noun “tree” and the Spanish infinitive morpheme – ar and presumably meaning “to climb a tree/trepar un arbol. ” In these descriptions, Puerto Rican speakers of contact Spanish are repeatedly associated with ridicule.  From Valdez, Juan R. “The battleground of metaphors: language debates and symbolic violence in Puerto Rico (1930-1960)” in Vol. 2, 1 (2016).