New resources for American history

Cambridge University Library and the Seeley Historical Library are delighted to announce three major new acquisitions of online archives for the study of American history in the University.

From June 2019 the University has access (on and off campus) to the Congressional Research Digital Collection, the Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection, and the Chicago Tribune in the Historical Newspapers series, all published by ProQuest, via the following links.

To promote the new resources in your library download and print the “New eResources in American History” A3 format poster.

 

Congressional Research Digital Collection

The CRDC is a collection of research materials – CRS Reports and Committee Prints – created for Congress.

CRS, the Congressional Research Service, is known as research arm of the United States Congress.  CRS issues thousands of reports each year on issues of interest to Congress.

Committee prints are publications pre­pared for the use of a specific committee so often are working stud­ies or compilations of articles prepared in the course of formulating legislation.

This material is often the first place you’ll find topics in the news, and because prints or reports might review pending legislation, or a government program, you’ll find them issued throughout the legislative process.   Material in CRDC can be used for many purposes:  to answer a reference question, create a chronology of events, to come up to speed on a topic, or to see what a proposal was at a specific point in time.

For more help on searching the CRDC visit the ProQuest LibGuide here.

The Congressional Research Digital Collection is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection

The Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection comprises the Congressional Record (beginning in 1873 and currently available through 2009), and the predecessor titles including the Congressional Globe (1833-1873), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Annals of Congress (1789-1824).

Help with searching the Congressional Record can be found on the Advanced Search Techniques section of the ProQuest LibGuide here.  ProQuest is currently re-designing the Congressional platform to improve its search capabilities and the “Congress in Context” feature.  For updates on the development over summer 2019 see this page.

The Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Tribune provided detailed accounts of the Great Fire of 1871, which killed hundreds, nearly destroyed the city, resulted in many reforms, and spurred new growth. In 1893 and 1909, the newspaper’s special Chicago Jubilee issues described and celebrated the city’s tremendous progress. It also reported on the Progressive Movement, followed the works of Nobel Peace Prize-winning social reformer Jane Addams, exposed the activities of mobsters like Al Capone, and reported on the city’s machine politics. To incisively convey ideas, opinions, and emotions, the Chicago Tribune relied on Pulitzer Prizewinning John T. McCutcheon’s editorial cartoons.

Readers can study the progression of issues over time by browsing issues of the Chicago Tribune, which offers coverage of 1849-1995, including news articles, photos, advertisements, classified ads, obituaries, cartoons, and more.

The Chicago Tribune is findable via iDiscover, the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z, the eresources Overseas and foreign language newspapers page, and the Newspapers LibGuide.

 

A flavour of the Congressional Research Digital Collection

Buzz salutes the U.S. Flag. (Wikimedia Commons)

“I believe we should go to the moon.” — President Kennedy, May 25, 1961, 87-1 (1961), HOUSE: VOLUME 107; (8877-8915) P. 8877.  Permalink.

 

More resources in American history

The study of American history is also supported by the University Library’s provision of access to the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post in the Historial Newspapers series and the 19th century United States Newspapers archive and the Early American Newspapers archive, as well as the United States Declassified Documents Online service:

New York Times

Wall Street Journal

Washington Post

19th century U.S. Newspapers Archive

Early American Newspapers Archive

United States Declassified Documents Online

For other resources in American politics and history, please visit the Cambridge LibGuides A-Z page here.  And the Seeley Historical Library Tripos pages here and here.

Europresse

The University of Cambridge now provides access to the news media of continental Europe and beyond

Through a new subscription to EUROPRESSE members of the University now have access to a wide range of European newspapers, including the French national and regional press (e.g. Le Monde, Le Figaro), news magazines, the international press (New York Times, Guardian, and many more), professional publications, news agencies, and TV and radio transcriptions.

Access is restricted to 2 concurrent users – please remember to log out from your session. If you are unable to gain access – il vous faudra patienter un peu.

Access is available on or off campus via the following link:-

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://nouveau.europresse.com/access/ip/default.aspx?un=U031883T_1

Thematically, Europresse titles cover the Humanities and Social Sciences, Politics, Law, Economics, Finance, Science, Environment, IT, Transports, Industry, Energy, Agriculture, Arts and culture (Lire, Le Magazine littéraire, World Literature Today, Télérama, Rock and Folk), Health, and event Sports (L’Équipe, France Football, Sport 24). It also includes some TV and radio transcripts, biographies and reports, images, audio and video content.

Times Higher Education

The University of Cambridge now has an institution-wide licence to the Times Higher Education (THE).

Staff and students keen to keep up to date with developments within the higher education sector can do so courtesy of a new institutional subscription to the Times Higher Education (THE) magazine.

The University has signed a three-year deal that enables staff and students to read the magazine online. Faculties and departments are therefore requested to cancel any subscriptions that they may have with the THE to reduce overall spend across the institution.

This licence allows all staff and students to access a range of editorial services, including:

  • regular newsletter updates
  • weekly digital editions of THE magazine
  • unrestricted access to THE online and via its app.

Individuals can find details on how to create their account on the University Library’s THE page here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/eresources/newspapers/british-newspapers/times-higher-education

They can also access this subscription off-campus and overseas, and THE can be accessed via the app on iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire devices.

Staff and students may also be interested to know that the University has an institutional subscription to the online version of the Financial Times. More information can be found on the University Library’s webpages here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/eresources/newspapers/british-newspapers/financial-times-ft

 

Trial access to Europresse

Trial access is now enabled to Europresse, a database of French newspapers, from today 22 January to Thursday next week 31 January 2019, via the link below.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EUROPRESS DATABASE

Cambridge University Library is starting a 10 days trial for Europresse, an aggregator which allows online access to many French and Francophone national and regional newspapers and magazines including Le Monde (from 1944), Le Figaro, Libération, L’Humanité, Les Echos, La Tribune, Le Soir, Le Temps, Le Parisien, Ouest-France, La Provence, L’Express, Le Point, Marianne, L’Obs, Le Monde diplomatique.

Europresse also offers access to English language titles from the UK (The Guardian, The Independent, The Economist, Financial Times) and the US (The New York Times, The Washington Post) as well as others from Europe (Die Tageszeitung), Africa (Africa Energy Intelligence, All Africa, Liberté –Algeria), the Middle East (Al Jazeera, Khaleej Times, Jerusalem Post), Asia (South China Morning Post, China Daily, Kabul Press) and Oceania (The Australian).

Thematically, Europresse titles cover the Humanities and Social Sciences, Politics, Law, Economics, Finance, Science, Environment, IT, Transports, Industry, Energy, Agriculture, Arts and culture (Lire, Le Magazine littéraire, World Literature Today, Télérama, Rock and Folk), Health, and event Sports (L’Équipe, France Football, Sport 24). It also includes some TV and radio transcripts, biographies and reports, images, audio and video content.

 

HOW TO ACCESS THE TRIAL OF EUROPRESSE AND PROVIDE FEEDBACK

Trial Access to Europresse for members of the University of Cambridge is available on and off campus at the following link from 22 January to 31 January 2019.

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://nouveau.europresse.com/access/ip/default.aspx?un=bdp7U_1

You can select the language of the interface in English or French.

Please let us know what you think of this resource via the Feedback Form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

A guide to using Europresse is available here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/sites/www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/files/europresse_en_.pdf#overlay-context=

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE ON THE ACCESS AVAILABLE IN TRIAL AND VIA SUBSCRIPTION

ACCESS IS ENABLED FOR 2 SIMULTANEOUS USERS, SO ONLY TWO MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY CAN USE EUROPRESSE AT ANY ONE TIME.

THEREFORE, TO ENSURE THE ACCESS IS AS SMOOTH AS IT CAN BE AND EUROPRESSE IS USED TO THE MAXIMUM, PLEASE LOGOFF FROM YOUR SESSION WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED.

This trial is enabled to obtain feedback from users to help the decision of the University Library on whether to proceed to subscription.   Subscription access would also be enabled for 2 users only to access Europresse at any given time.

If you have any questions please write to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.

FURTHER ONLINE HELP ON USING EUROPRESSE

Tutorials are accessible online:

Comment utiliser l’espace PDF <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJbeIKF1dHM&feature=youtu.be>

Comment effectuer une recherche simple <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2r1QrMQu1TA&feature=youtu.be>

Comment effectuer une recherche avancée <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2EDmk2BY0c&feature=youtu.be>

Comment visualiser les résultats de recherche <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCiSwerC7lU&feature=youtu.be>

Comment sauvegarder des documents <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXn_B8ClBRY&feature=youtu.be>

Comment imprimer un document <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFNbXX7pCGI&feature=youtu.be>

Comment épingler un document <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydwsOx9yUhk&feature=youtu.be>

Ireland in the news since the 1700s: New newspaper archives online

Cambridge University Library now makes available newspaper archives online for the study of the history of Ireland and the Irish.

The Irish Times, founded in 1859, is a key newspaper in the study of Irish history, and of unionism in Ireland in particular, and access is now online from the first issue up to the most recent at this link:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://www.irishtimes.com/archive

Only the last week to two weeks’ issues are not available at any given time.

The Irish Newspaper Archive comprises many newspapers, from national broadsheets to regional papers, some dating back to the eighteenth century, and is the largest such database available online.  Titles include the Irish Independent (1905-current), the Irish Examiner (1841-current), The Freeman’s Journal (1763-1924), the Connacht Tribune (1909-current), the Meath Chronicle (1897-current) and the Southern Star (1892-current).  A full list of coverage is available here.

Access the Irish Newspaper Archive via this link:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=http://www.irishnewsarchive.com

A poster for promoting the archive in libraries can be found here.

 

Civil-service writer: Brian O’Nolan (right), aka Flann O’Brien and Myles na gCopaleen, with the writer, playwright and National Gallery of Ireland registrar John Weldon, aka Brinsley MacNamaraContributors to the Irish Times: Brian O’Nolan (right), aka Flann O’Brien and Myles na gCopaleen, with the writer, playwright and National Gallery of Ireland registrar John Weldon, aka Brinsley MacNamara.

FT.com for the Cambridge reader

Cambridge University Library and the Marshall Library of Economics are delighted to announce that all University of Cambridge members now have access, both within the University and from anywhere in the world, to the Financial Times online direct via the FT‘s website, FT.com.

The Financial Times is the world’s premier newspaper for business and economics.

The FT.com can be accessed on campus direct to https://www.ft.com or off campus via Raven (Shibboleth Single Sign-On) using this link.

Links to the FT.com can be found on the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z, the LibGuide for Newspapers, and via iDiscover.

To get the most out of your access, create an account on FT.com by clicking the “Sign in” link on the FT.com site.  Cambridge users can enter their cam.ac.uk email address and create an account.  After creating your account you can access your FT.com content via the Single Sign-On (SSO) button which will recognise you as a member of the University.

The FT.com App for Android and iOS can be downloaded from the App Store or from Google Play.  For more information see here.

The FT describes itself as “one of the world’s leading news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. It is part of Nikkei Inc., which provides a broad range of information, news and services for the global business community.”

FT.com access significantly enhances the Cambridge reader’s existing access via Factiva and ABI/Inform, providing up-to-the-minute news coverage, all statistical sources and their full visualization online, personalization of content, and companies and markets data.

Maisaku : trial access

Cambridge University Library is participating in a free trial of Maisaku from 1 February to the beginning of March. This is an archive of Mainichi Shinbun from the Meiji period to today. If you are on campus, you can try it via the link below:

https://dbs.g-search.or.jp/WMAI/WMAI_ipcu_login.html

 

For now, you will need to use the Cambridge VPN to use Maisaku off campus. You can find instructions here: https://help.uis.cam.ac.uk/devices-networks-printing/remote-access/uis-vpn

 

An update will be posted on the blog if we are able to set access off campus via Raven more easily.   We have discussed the problem with the vendor, and we expect that the trial may be extended a few more days into March for this reason.

 Palaceside Building, the headquarters of Mainichi Shimbun in Toykyo