FT.com for the Cambridge reader

Cambridge University Library and the Marshall Library of Economics are delighted to announce that all University of Cambridge members now have access, both within the University and from anywhere in the world, to the Financial Times online direct via the FT‘s website, FT.com.

The Financial Times is the world’s premier newspaper for business and economics.

The FT.com can be accessed on campus direct to https://www.ft.com or off campus via Raven (Shibboleth Single Sign-On) using this link.

Links to the FT.com can be found on the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z, the LibGuide for Newspapers, and via iDiscover.

To get the most out of your access, create an account on FT.com by clicking the “Sign in” link on the FT.com site.  Cambridge users can enter their cam.ac.uk email address and create an account.  After creating your account you can access your FT.com content via the Single Sign-On (SSO) button which will recognise you as a member of the University.

The FT.com App for Android and iOS can be downloaded from the App Store or from Google Play.  For more information see here.

The FT describes itself as “one of the world’s leading news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. It is part of Nikkei Inc., which provides a broad range of information, news and services for the global business community.”

FT.com access significantly enhances the Cambridge reader’s existing access via Factiva and ABI/Inform, providing up-to-the-minute news coverage, all statistical sources and their full visualization online, personalization of content, and companies and markets data.

Maisaku : trial access

Cambridge University Library is participating in a free trial of Maisaku from 1 February to the beginning of March. This is an archive of Mainichi Shinbun from the Meiji period to today. If you are on campus, you can try it via the link below:

https://dbs.g-search.or.jp/WMAI/WMAI_ipcu_login.html

 

For now, you will need to use the Cambridge VPN to use Maisaku off campus. You can find instructions here: https://help.uis.cam.ac.uk/devices-networks-printing/remote-access/uis-vpn

 

An update will be posted on the blog if we are able to set access off campus via Raven more easily.   We have discussed the problem with the vendor, and we expect that the trial may be extended a few more days into March for this reason.

 Palaceside Building, the headquarters of Mainichi Shimbun in Toykyo

 

Factiva – searching for a specific article

Factiva is a  business and news database of over 8,000 publications. Sources date from 1969 onwards and include full-text of many national and regional newspapers. Here is a quick guide on how to search for a specific article on this platform.

Example article: Salt, J. and Clarke, J. 2005. Migration matters. Prospect Magazine.

factiva-1-1

The search term in this case is “migration matters”.

Note that the default date range is usually set to “30 days” . You can change this to “all dates” using the dropdown list.

You can also choose the exact source you want to search by clicking on the blue triangle next to Source, which brings up a new search box. In this case you want to search the “Prospect Magazine”.

Finally, we suggest using the search button at the bottom right hand of the screen in order to see the full range of results. The top search button does not seem to take all the search criteria into account.

The following results screen should display:

factiva-2

Click on the title “migration matters” for acces to full-text.

Further information on how to use eresources@cambridge is available here.

 

Times Digital Archive adds over 20 years

The Times Digital Archive 1785-2010 in a new extended version adds over 20 years to the original 1785-1985 edition, offering users an extra 585,000 pages, approx. 3.4 million articles, and more than 6,500 issues.

The old interface has been replaced by a new one offering additional features:

  • Citation generation – users can now automatically create citations and export them to 3rd party bibliographic software, such as EndNote and RefWorks
  • Named user functionality – a Gale account allows users to save searches and marked items across sessions
  • New image viewer – ability to manipulate images more easily and view articles and whole pages full screen
  • Wider variety of printing options – making printing awkward size articles much easier
  • …and an all-new design, making the archive a more pleasant experience to users

Access the new version of the archive here: http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/go.php?c=8160238.

 

Simplifying the user experience for British Newspapers and Burney

From tomorrow, 7 July 2016, the British Newspapers 1600-1900 site, which enabled cross searching of the Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers and 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers collections, will be retired and cross searching provided instead via the Artemis platform here:

http://gdc.galegroup.com/gdc/artemis?fromProdId=ECCO&p=GDCS&u=cambuni

The links in the eresources@cambridge A-Z and Cambridge LibGuides A-Z have been updated.

Nineteenth century British Library Newspapers and the 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers continue to be provided as separate collections.

Asahi Shimbun

Japanese studies benefits from the launch of the Asahi Shimbun daily newspaper in English here:

http://www.asahi.com/ajw/

The eresources@cambridge subject pages and A-Z, Cambridge LibGuides A-Z and the newspapers LibGuide have been updated accordingly.

LONDON–With an injured rib smarting, Kei Nishikori kept going until he couldn’t stand it any longer. The time to call it quits came Monday in the fourth round at Wimbledon, trailing 6-1, 5-1 against Marin Cilic on No. 2 Court. “Even before the match, I knew it’s not going to be easy for me to play 100 percent,” Niskikori said. “Every point I played, it got worse. I didn’t want to, but I guess I had to retire today.”

Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers

The University Library is delighted to announce members of the University now have full online access to the digital archive Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers.

The archive can be accessed via this link or via the eresources@cambridge index and subject pages or via the LibGuides A-ZTitles in the archive will also be searchable in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z and in iDiscover shortly.

The archive content can be searched alternatively via the new Artemis Primary Sources platform either in isolation or in combination with the other digital archives available from Gale Cengage licensed to the University.  Work is in progress by ProQuest to enable searching of the  full text of the archive content via iDiscover.

The archive comprises digital facsimile images of both full pages and clipped articles for hundreds of 19th century U.S. newspapers and advanced searching capabilities. For each issue, the newspaper is captured from cover-to-cover, providing access to every article, advertisement and illustration.

As compelling as it is comprehensive,  Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers provides access to primary source newspaper content from the 19th century, featuring full-text content and images from numerous newspapers from a range of urban and rural regions throughout the U.S. The collection encompasses the entire 19th century, with an emphasis on such topics as the American Civil War, African-American culture and history, Western migration and Antebellum-era life, among other subjects.

This full-text searchable, facsimile-image database makes experiencing historical events, daily life and 19th-century American culture as easy as clicking a mouse.   Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers provides easy access to seemingly endless information and primary resources — the vast majority of which have never before been accessible online.

CAUCUS! CAUCUS!! CAUCUS!!!

Citizens of North Carolina, awake! An invasion of your liberties is threatened, and as public sentinels, we should be recreant to our trust, did we not promptly sound the tocsin of alarm. There are those at the seat of Government, who are seeking to load the people by chains, by corrupting their government, and bringing them under the surveillance of the Albany Regency.  An insidious and artful attempt has been made by some skulking birds of the night, owl-like beings, who dare not show their faces in open day to their fellow men, to dupe the Legislature of North Carolina – to draw it, by the mere force of a name, into that filthy vortex of political corruption, the caucusing system…

(United States Telegraph (Washington, DC) December 6, 1832, issue 290)