Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception Online

The University Library and the Divinity Faculty Library are pleased to inform that members of the University now have access to the Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception Online published by De Gruyter at this URL:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://www.degruyter.com/view/db/ebr

The user guide is available here:

https://www.degruyter.com/view/supplement/db21401_EBR_Online_User_Guide_en.pdf

The encyclopedia contains the most current state of knowledge on the origins and development of the Bible in the canons within Judaism and Christianity. It documents the history of biblical reception, not only in Christian churches and the Jewish Diaspora, but also in Islam, other non-Western religious traditions and movements.

This reference work compiles recent scientific research on the reception of the Bible in an array of academic disciplines such as classical, literary and religious studies and archaeology as well as in cultural fields like literature, visual arts, music, film and dance.

  • Essential resource for scholars in Biblical, Cultural, and Religious Studies and related fields
  • Regular updates of over 2,000 articles per year
  • Access to ahead-of-print articles, i.e., not yet available in the print version

The Encyclopedia is also available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z and via iDiscover.

The First Mourning.  William-Adolphe Bourguereau.  Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes.  Wikimedia Commons.

 

New resources for American history

Cambridge University Library and the Seeley Historical Library are delighted to announce three major new acquisitions of online archives for the study of American history in the University.

From June 2019 the University has access (on and off campus) to the Congressional Research Digital Collection, the Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection, and the Chicago Tribune in the Historical Newspapers series, all published by ProQuest, via the following links.

To promote the new resources in your library download and print the “New eResources in American History” A3 format poster.

 

Congressional Research Digital Collection

The CRDC is a collection of research materials – CRS Reports and Committee Prints – created for Congress.

CRS, the Congressional Research Service, is known as research arm of the United States Congress.  CRS issues thousands of reports each year on issues of interest to Congress.

Committee prints are publications pre­pared for the use of a specific committee so often are working stud­ies or compilations of articles prepared in the course of formulating legislation.

This material is often the first place you’ll find topics in the news, and because prints or reports might review pending legislation, or a government program, you’ll find them issued throughout the legislative process.   Material in CRDC can be used for many purposes:  to answer a reference question, create a chronology of events, to come up to speed on a topic, or to see what a proposal was at a specific point in time.

For more help on searching the CRDC visit the ProQuest LibGuide here.

The Congressional Research Digital Collection is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection

The Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection comprises the Congressional Record (beginning in 1873 and currently available through 2009), and the predecessor titles including the Congressional Globe (1833-1873), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Annals of Congress (1789-1824).

Help with searching the Congressional Record can be found on the Advanced Search Techniques section of the ProQuest LibGuide here.  ProQuest is currently re-designing the Congressional platform to improve its search capabilities and the “Congress in Context” feature.  For updates on the development over summer 2019 see this page.

The Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Tribune provided detailed accounts of the Great Fire of 1871, which killed hundreds, nearly destroyed the city, resulted in many reforms, and spurred new growth. In 1893 and 1909, the newspaper’s special Chicago Jubilee issues described and celebrated the city’s tremendous progress. It also reported on the Progressive Movement, followed the works of Nobel Peace Prize-winning social reformer Jane Addams, exposed the activities of mobsters like Al Capone, and reported on the city’s machine politics. To incisively convey ideas, opinions, and emotions, the Chicago Tribune relied on Pulitzer Prizewinning John T. McCutcheon’s editorial cartoons.

Readers can study the progression of issues over time by browsing issues of the Chicago Tribune, which offers coverage of 1849-1995, including news articles, photos, advertisements, classified ads, obituaries, cartoons, and more.

The Chicago Tribune is findable via iDiscover, the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z, the eresources Overseas and foreign language newspapers page, and the Newspapers LibGuide.

 

A flavour of the Congressional Research Digital Collection

Buzz salutes the U.S. Flag. (Wikimedia Commons)

“I believe we should go to the moon.” — President Kennedy, May 25, 1961, 87-1 (1961), HOUSE: VOLUME 107; (8877-8915) P. 8877.  Permalink.

 

More resources in American history

The study of American history is also supported by the University Library’s provision of access to the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post in the Historial Newspapers series and the 19th century United States Newspapers archive and the Early American Newspapers archive, as well as the United States Declassified Documents Online service:

New York Times

Wall Street Journal

Washington Post

19th century U.S. Newspapers Archive

Early American Newspapers Archive

United States Declassified Documents Online

For other resources in American politics and history, please visit the Cambridge LibGuides A-Z page here.  And the Seeley Historical Library Tripos pages here and here.

BioDiversity Heritage Library now in iDiscover

“The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is the world’s largest open access digital library for biodiversity literature and archives. BHL is revolutionizing global research by providing free, worldwide access to knowledge about life on Earth.”

Picture of a London park from the BioDiverty Heritage Library's collection on Flickr

The BioDiversity Heritage Library publications are now available to search in iDiscover. The collection contains scientific monographs, magazines and journals from around the world providing access to over 55 million pages from the 15th to 21st centuries. The texts are fully searchable and can be downloaded.

The BioDiversity Heritage Library aims:

“To document Earth’s species and understand the complexities of swiftly-changing ecosystems in the midst of a major extinction crisis and widespread climate change, researchers need something that no single library can provide – access to the world’s collective knowledge about biodiversity. While natural history books and archives contain information that is critical to studying biodiversity, much of this material is available in only a handful of libraries globally. Scientists have long considered this lack of access to biodiversity literature as a major impediment to the efficiency of scientific research.

“BHL operates as a worldwide consortium of natural history, botanical, research, and national libraries working together to address this challenge by digitizing the natural history literature held in their collections and making it freely available for open access as part of a global “biodiversity community.””

As well as providing access to individual titles the BHL also collates collections, such as:

Women in Natural History

BHL Australia

Charles Darwin’s Library

Language of Flowers

Rarest of the Rare

 

Image credit: ‘n342_w1150’ by the BioDiversity Heritage library on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/2dDg79B

Ireland in the news since the 1700s: New newspaper archives online

Cambridge University Library now makes available newspaper archives online for the study of the history of Ireland and the Irish.

The Irish Times, founded in 1859, is a key newspaper in the study of Irish history, and of unionism in Ireland in particular, and access is now online from the first issue up to the most recent at this link:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://www.irishtimes.com/archive

Only the last week to two weeks’ issues are not available at any given time.

The Irish Newspaper Archive comprises many newspapers, from national broadsheets to regional papers, some dating back to the eighteenth century, and is the largest such database available online.  Titles include the Irish Independent (1905-current), the Irish Examiner (1841-current), The Freeman’s Journal (1763-1924), the Connacht Tribune (1909-current), the Meath Chronicle (1897-current) and the Southern Star (1892-current).  A full list of coverage is available here.

Access the Irish Newspaper Archive via this link:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=http://www.irishnewsarchive.com

A poster for promoting the archive in libraries can be found here.

 

Civil-service writer: Brian O’Nolan (right), aka Flann O’Brien and Myles na gCopaleen, with the writer, playwright and National Gallery of Ireland registrar John Weldon, aka Brinsley MacNamaraContributors to the Irish Times: Brian O’Nolan (right), aka Flann O’Brien and Myles na gCopaleen, with the writer, playwright and National Gallery of Ireland registrar John Weldon, aka Brinsley MacNamara.

Biblioteca Italiana Zanichelli (“La BIZ”)

The BIZ (Biblioteca Italiana Zanichelli) is an online collection of over 1,000 texts of Italian literature, ranging from its origins to the early decades of the twentieth century.

Published by Casalini Libri, and available on its “Ubidictionary” platform, the BIZ includes the complete works of the major Italian writers, as well as those of many minor and obscure writers.

Additional multimedia and translation features are available when a personal account is created.

Access the collection via this link on or off campus:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://u.ubidictionary.com/dashboard/

or via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.  Please note that our subscription is limited to 3 simultaneous users, so when you have finished your session please log out.  Thank you.

 

New e-resource: Euromaidan Protests in Ukraine, 2013-2014

Cambridge has purchased access to the Euromaidan Protests in Ukraine, 2013-2014 database.  The resource is described by its supplier, East View, as:

“[representing] the most comprehensive collection of ephemera and primary source material from the Euromaidan protests that rocked Kiev beginning on November 21, 2013. The collection contains over 500 pages of unique print materials collected by East View researchers at Kiev’s Maidan Nezalezhnosti, the epicenter of the protests. East View’s one of a kind collection provides researchers and analysts with easy, time- and cost-saving access to important documents, on-the-scene photographs, and various other print materials, which in turn would allow these researchers to reconstruct the complex social and political dynamics at play during the protests with better precision.”

Readers can browse by content, source, and object type.  The database’s contents are true ephemera: the object types include leaflets and flyers, stickers, ribbons, and fridge magnets.  The coverage also includes newspapers and other items relating to events in Crimea, including political leaflets produced in the run-up to the Crimea referendum in March 2014.

Please do note that the file size of some of the Euromaidan Protests database content can be significant, so some pages will load slowly.

This purchase of the Euromaidan Protests database provides a crucial counterbalance to another East View resource recently acquired, the Donetsk and Luhansk Newspaper Collection, which contains newspaper issues from 2013-2015 produced in these regions.  While neither database is particularly large, they provide much-needed access to material that might otherwise be lost.  Both purchases were made possible thanks to the generous support of the Catherine Cooke Fund

Both databases also complement the University Library’s growing collection of printed books in Ukrainian, Russian, and English about the Euromaidan protests, the ongoing conflict in East Ukraine, and the annexation of Crimea.

Composite of samples of ephemera from the Euromaidan Protests database

Gregory of Nyssa Online (Gregorii Nysseni Opera Online and Lexicon Gregorianum Online)

Cambridge University Library now makes available online access to the Gregorii Nysseni Opera and the Lexicon Gregorianum via the Gregory of Nyssa Online resource on the Brill Reference Works platform.   Access Gregory of Nyssa Online via this link on or off campus.

Gregorii Nysseni Opera Online is the ultimate online critical text edition of Gregory of Nyssa’s works based on all available known manuscripts, introduced with a complete discussion of the textual transmission and accompanied by extensive annotations on the biblical, classical and patristic sources, and indices.

Lexicon Gregorianum Online is the most comprehensive Greek-German dictionary of the language used by Gregory of Nyssa. It is the only dictionary available specifically addressing the vocabulary of late Classical Greek. It documents Gregory’s complete vocabulary, taking account of the syntax, meaning and connotations of every occurrence of a key word in his writings. The complete Lexicon Online comprises 10 volumes, totaling more than 13,000 entries.

The University Library ran a successful trial of this resource in February this year.