Announcing the Contemporary Music Score Collection – All Open Access

Via the  Kaleidoscope 2020 Call for Scores in collaboration with the UCLA Music Library, composers were offered the unique opportunity for their music to be published open access with the UCLA Music Library.

Since then,  UCLA has been working hard to publish and make the open access scores available. There are currently nearly 5000 scores published and they are continuing to publish the additional scores throughout the summer.

The scores are published on eScholarship, in a collection titled Contemporary Music Score Collection:

https://escholarship.org/uc/uclamusicscores

Published by the UCLA Music Library in eScholarship, the Contemporary Music Score Collection includes the digital, open access scores from the Contemporary Score Edition series, the first open access edition of new music published by a library, and scores from the Kaleidoscope 2020 Call for Scores, an open access collaboration with the UCLA Music Library.

Lean Library and CORE

The Lean Library browser plug in now includes a search for open access research papers from the CORE database.

With Lean Library you can search any website from off campus and you will be redirected through our Raven authentication, if you not already authenticated. If a subscribed article is not available Lean Library will search for a subscribed article from a different provider and then search for an Open Access version of the article from a number of sources, including CORE and Unpaywall.

Lean Library helps you to access articles from anywhere at anytime.

Lean Library is easy to disable and re-enable if you find that websites are being loaded through the plug-in when there is no journal access.

Photo by Jopwell from Pexels

Clarivate Analytics Introduce New Open Access Data in Journal Citation Reports

Clarivate Analytics Introduce New Open Access Data in Journal Citation Reports.

Clarivate Analytics have announced the addition of open access data to  Journal Citation Reports profile pages to increase transparency around open access models in scholarly publishing. The new data show each journal’s articles by access model. This provides the research community with transparent, publisher-neutral information about the relative contribution of articles published free to read and re-use under Creative Commons licenses (‘gold open access’) to a journal’s overall volume of content and citations. The new feature is in beta until the launch of the 2020 Journal Citation Reports in June (JCR data 2019).

For the approximately 5,200 hybrid journals in Journal Citation Reports, readers will now quickly and easily be able to identify:

  • the number of papers published via the traditional subscription model, and
  • those published via Creative Commons licenses

Full details of the announcement can be found at:

https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/news/clarivate-introduces-new-open-access-data-into-web-of-science-journal-citation-reports/

Please find links below to further information:

  • PPT slides of the recent Clarivate Analytics ‘What’s new in Journal Citation Reports and InCites Benchmarking & Analytics?’ webinar:

               https://wok.mimas.ac.uk/support/documentation/presentations/incites0420.pdf

  • Open Access Data in JCR – video tutorial:

https://play.vidyard.com/W89W55vUSfUoZdoFcSfuWb

  • Open Access Data in JCR – Quick Reference Guide

https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/04/OA-in-JCR-QRG-final.pdf

OA Helper

Reposted from the CORE blog

The CORE Team is happy to inform you that  Claus Wolf, with CORE’s support, has developed the OA Helper – a  brand new application, which enables iOS users to search for scientific articles in their devices without hitting a paywall. Fascinated by Open Access and Open Source, Claus Wolf implemented CORE Discovery and CORE Recommender into this application.

Claus Wolf says: “Open Access provides a level playing field on which innovation can be built and also serves as a field for learning. Creating a tool that would support Open Access for macOS & iOS users thus seemed like a worthwhile endeavour and it turned out to be a great learning opportunity for him.” To install this application on your device, just visit the Apple Store site.

Read more about this here https://blog.core.ac.uk/2020/02/11/are-you-an-ios-user-access-scientific-articles-in-your-device-without-hitting-a-paywall/

New e-resources pages on search and discovery tools

New pages on search and discovery tools have been added to the e-resources website.   These pages are intended to promote discovery of Open Access content and provide links and guidance to help users when they meet a subscription paywall.

The pages can be access here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/search-and-discovery-tools

and are linked from the top-left box on the e-resources site.

The pages replace the “Articles and journals” page.

The iDiscover article search box has been moved to the first concertina box on the “Ask Cambridge Libraries” page.

There is also now linked from this page an iDiscover “Citation Linker” for article searching using ISSN, Title, DOI or PMID (or ISBN for books).

The pages comprise:

Open Access browser plugins

Super-easy to install and use, we recommend extensions to your browser to deliver the articles you need

Where to find Open Access content

Guiding you to the most important sites to search for articles and books outside the paywall

Use document delivery services

Find out about the range of inter-library loan and document scanning services Cambridge offers

Ask your library and network

Use Cambridge libraries for help and advice using social networks to obtain access to publications

 

The pages have been produced by the working together of the Office of Scholarly Communication, the Digital Services Web Manager, and the E-resources & E-journals teams.

 

BioDiversity Heritage Library now in iDiscover

“The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is the world’s largest open access digital library for biodiversity literature and archives. BHL is revolutionizing global research by providing free, worldwide access to knowledge about life on Earth.”

Picture of a London park from the BioDiverty Heritage Library's collection on Flickr

The BioDiversity Heritage Library publications are now available to search in iDiscover. The collection contains scientific monographs, magazines and journals from around the world providing access to over 55 million pages from the 15th to 21st centuries. The texts are fully searchable and can be downloaded.

The BioDiversity Heritage Library aims:

“To document Earth’s species and understand the complexities of swiftly-changing ecosystems in the midst of a major extinction crisis and widespread climate change, researchers need something that no single library can provide – access to the world’s collective knowledge about biodiversity. While natural history books and archives contain information that is critical to studying biodiversity, much of this material is available in only a handful of libraries globally. Scientists have long considered this lack of access to biodiversity literature as a major impediment to the efficiency of scientific research.

“BHL operates as a worldwide consortium of natural history, botanical, research, and national libraries working together to address this challenge by digitizing the natural history literature held in their collections and making it freely available for open access as part of a global “biodiversity community.””

As well as providing access to individual titles the BHL also collates collections, such as:

Women in Natural History

BHL Australia

Charles Darwin’s Library

Language of Flowers

Rarest of the Rare

 

Image credit: ‘n342_w1150’ by the BioDiversity Heritage library on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/2dDg79B

OA2020: Some short answers to big questions

A new blog post on OA2020 provides some short answers to big questions.

The open access landscape is highly complex, and the academic community does well to reflect on the ambitions, progress and impact of the many approaches that are working toward an open information environment.

When considering the Open Access 2020 Initiative, some have raised the question of what OA2020 is about. OA2020 is not prescriptive in its approach and embraces any number of strategies aimed at systematically removing our financial investment in the paywall system controlled by the large commercial publishers and shifting those funds to support open access publishing models. For some communities, this might mean engaging in big deal subscription cancellationscommitting a portion of institutional funds toward a scholarly commonspublisher negotiations, or other methods. The common denominator is simply the OA2020 call to divest of the subscription system and invest in open access–whatever that process looks like for your community.

Others have also asked whether negotiating transitional agreements—just one of any number of strategies which align with the overall objectives of OA2020—might perpetuate the dominance of the large commercial publishers and put under-funded researchers at a disadvantage. This question and more have been addressed in a recent blog post which sheds light on the approach, strategies and goals of OA2020. https://oa2020.org/2018/04/17/some-short-answers-to-big-questions/

Re-posted from the LibLicense-L Discussion Forum <LIBLICENSE-L@LISTSERV.CRL.EDU>.

Open Access coming to iDiscover?

Developments over December 2017 and January 2018 may improve prospects for significant benefits to the user’s search experience in iDiscover.

Expanded your results beyond your collection in iDiscover, but hit the paywall as a result?  For some time now, you could hit your Open Access button bookmarklet and get delivery of an OA repository version.   Rather than extend search from outside with a tool, a new agreement should maximise search to discovery to delivery, dramatically decreasing the pain of that journey for users.   Over 2018, we should see the integration of Primo (iDiscover) with CORE, making available in the University’s discovery service many millions of records for OA research articles, following the new partnership of the CORE service with Ex Libris.

The agreement has been described on the JISC involve blog here:

The aggregated content includes metadata (currently 90m records) and open access research outputs hosted in CORE (currently 9m full text articles) from more than 3,600 repositories and over 10,000 journals in the UK and worldwide (currently 70 countries) and in 53 languages. The Open University’s activity with the OpenMinTeD project (providing connectors to publisher OA content from Elsevier, Springer, Frontiers and PLoS ) has also resulted in more OA content (1,831,977 full text items) in CORE.

Given that CORE, to our knowledge, is the largest aggregation of full text OA content, it makes sense that, as part of its strategy, content is surface in existing library search products. Therefore, the partnership between CORE and ProQuest to surface OA content from CORE within Ex Libris Primo and Ex Libris Summon is a positive first step towards this aim. CORE is also intending to integrate with other library search products to ensure a wider search experience across all library search products.

In terms of navigating the paywall, for too long the University’s user community has found the task of getting access to content just that – a task.  And no way should it be.   Though Ex Libris has provided multiple repositories as collections we have activated for searching in iDiscover, the integration with CORE (COnnecting REpositories) should be on another scale, outstripping current capabilities completely in terms of user expectations.  Of course, searchers may still well prefer to search where they know all research is open, but innovations like Unpaywall and the Open Access button, as the Jisc R&D project demonstrated late last year (its findings coinciding with the Ex Libris-CORE agreement), are already engendering potential for big changes in library discovery and Inter-Library Loan services.

Open Library of Humanities

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : open library of humanities.

Following the launch of the Open Library of Humanities earlier this year, journals published on this platform are now available via the ejournals A-Z.

The following seven journal titles are included:

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 to present.

Access the Open Library of Humanities via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or the links above.

Open Access E-Books: Johns Hopkins University Press/Project MUSE Awarded Mellon Foundation Grant to Develop “Muse Open”

From a Project MUSE Announcement: Johns Hopkins University Press is delighted to announce the award of a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the development of MUSE Open, a distribution channel for open access monographs through Project MUSE, a leading provider of digital humanities and social science content for the scholarly community.

JHUP_logo2“The Mellon Foundation was an early and important supporter of Project MUSE,” said Kathleen Keane, Director of Johns Hopkins University Press. “Mellon’s support of MUSE Open will be instrumental in sustaining and extending our mission to ensure the long-term viability of monographic scholarship.”

MUSE Open will leverage a powerful and trusted distribution channel for long-form humanities scholarship in an enriched digital format. Monographs included in the program will be distributed globally and made visible and usable through discoverability and accessibility tools normally reserved for paid content.

project_muse_logoMUSE Open content will be promoted to researchers, students, and general readers worldwide through existing library channels and through social media, including MUSE Commons. Participating publishers will enjoy the freedom to control the sales, distribution, and marketing of the corresponding printed works.

“In an era of declining library budgets and shifts in reading and consumption habits, scholarly publishers find it increasingly difficult to sustain high-quality digital and print monograph publishing programs in the humanities and qualitative social sciences,” said Keane. “MUSE Open will take advantage of new funding models that take the purchasing burden away from end users for the purposes of providing important new scholarly content available free of charge to readers around the world.”

via Open Access E-Books: Johns Hopkins University Press/Project MUSE Awarded Mellon Foundation Grant to Develop “Muse Open”.