OA2020: Some short answers to big questions

A new blog post on OA2020 provides some short answers to big questions.

The open access landscape is highly complex, and the academic community does well to reflect on the ambitions, progress and impact of the many approaches that are working toward an open information environment.

When considering the Open Access 2020 Initiative, some have raised the question of what OA2020 is about. OA2020 is not prescriptive in its approach and embraces any number of strategies aimed at systematically removing our financial investment in the paywall system controlled by the large commercial publishers and shifting those funds to support open access publishing models. For some communities, this might mean engaging in big deal subscription cancellationscommitting a portion of institutional funds toward a scholarly commonspublisher negotiations, or other methods. The common denominator is simply the OA2020 call to divest of the subscription system and invest in open access–whatever that process looks like for your community.

Others have also asked whether negotiating transitional agreements—just one of any number of strategies which align with the overall objectives of OA2020—might perpetuate the dominance of the large commercial publishers and put under-funded researchers at a disadvantage. This question and more have been addressed in a recent blog post which sheds light on the approach, strategies and goals of OA2020. https://oa2020.org/2018/04/17/some-short-answers-to-big-questions/

Re-posted from the LibLicense-L Discussion Forum <LIBLICENSE-L@LISTSERV.CRL.EDU>.

Open Access coming to iDiscover?

Developments over December 2017 and January 2018 may improve prospects for significant benefits to the user’s search experience in iDiscover.

Expanded your results beyond your collection in iDiscover, but hit the paywall as a result?  For some time now, you could hit your Open Access button bookmarklet and get delivery of an OA repository version.   Rather than extend search from outside with a tool, a new agreement should maximise search to discovery to delivery, dramatically decreasing the pain of that journey for users.   Over 2018, we should see the integration of Primo (iDiscover) with CORE, making available in the University’s discovery service many millions of records for OA research articles, following the new partnership of the CORE service with Ex Libris.

The agreement has been described on the JISC involve blog here:

The aggregated content includes metadata (currently 90m records) and open access research outputs hosted in CORE (currently 9m full text articles) from more than 3,600 repositories and over 10,000 journals in the UK and worldwide (currently 70 countries) and in 53 languages. The Open University’s activity with the OpenMinTeD project (providing connectors to publisher OA content from Elsevier, Springer, Frontiers and PLoS ) has also resulted in more OA content (1,831,977 full text items) in CORE.

Given that CORE, to our knowledge, is the largest aggregation of full text OA content, it makes sense that, as part of its strategy, content is surface in existing library search products. Therefore, the partnership between CORE and ProQuest to surface OA content from CORE within Ex Libris Primo and Ex Libris Summon is a positive first step towards this aim. CORE is also intending to integrate with other library search products to ensure a wider search experience across all library search products.

In terms of navigating the paywall, for too long the University’s user community has found the task of getting access to content just that – a task.  And no way should it be.   Though Ex Libris has provided multiple repositories as collections we have activated for searching in iDiscover, the integration with CORE (COnnecting REpositories) should be on another scale, outstripping current capabilities completely in terms of user expectations.  Of course, searchers may still well prefer to search where they know all research is open, but innovations like Unpaywall and the Open Access button, as the Jisc R&D project demonstrated late last year (its findings coinciding with the Ex Libris-CORE agreement), are already engendering potential for big changes in library discovery and Inter-Library Loan services.

Open Library of Humanities

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : open library of humanities.

Following the launch of the Open Library of Humanities earlier this year, journals published on this platform are now available via the ejournals A-Z.

The following seven journal titles are included:

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 to present.

Access the Open Library of Humanities via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or the links above.

Open Access E-Books: Johns Hopkins University Press/Project MUSE Awarded Mellon Foundation Grant to Develop “Muse Open”

From a Project MUSE Announcement: Johns Hopkins University Press is delighted to announce the award of a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the development of MUSE Open, a distribution channel for open access monographs through Project MUSE, a leading provider of digital humanities and social science content for the scholarly community.

JHUP_logo2“The Mellon Foundation was an early and important supporter of Project MUSE,” said Kathleen Keane, Director of Johns Hopkins University Press. “Mellon’s support of MUSE Open will be instrumental in sustaining and extending our mission to ensure the long-term viability of monographic scholarship.”

MUSE Open will leverage a powerful and trusted distribution channel for long-form humanities scholarship in an enriched digital format. Monographs included in the program will be distributed globally and made visible and usable through discoverability and accessibility tools normally reserved for paid content.

project_muse_logoMUSE Open content will be promoted to researchers, students, and general readers worldwide through existing library channels and through social media, including MUSE Commons. Participating publishers will enjoy the freedom to control the sales, distribution, and marketing of the corresponding printed works.

“In an era of declining library budgets and shifts in reading and consumption habits, scholarly publishers find it increasingly difficult to sustain high-quality digital and print monograph publishing programs in the humanities and qualitative social sciences,” said Keane. “MUSE Open will take advantage of new funding models that take the purchasing burden away from end users for the purposes of providing important new scholarly content available free of charge to readers around the world.”

via Open Access E-Books: Johns Hopkins University Press/Project MUSE Awarded Mellon Foundation Grant to Develop “Muse Open”.

UNESCO Open Access publications

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization has made thousands of publications freely available online.
UNESCO OA

The UNESCO Open Access Policy begins with this quote from the World Conference of Science, 1999, held under the auspices of UNESCO and ICSU:

“Equal access to science is not only a social and ethical requirement for human development, but also essential for realizing the full potential of scientific communities worldwide and for orienting scientific progress towards meeting the needs of humankind.”

UNESCO has adopted an Open Access policy in order to make it’s publications freely available to the public and  to provide the public with an insight into the work of the organization. Publications are published in a variety of languages, including English, Russian, French, Spanish, and Chinese.

The UNESCO Open Access Repository includes the following resources:

UNESCO Open Educational Resource Platform 

 Global Open Access Portal

Publications in Open Access

UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger

Documents available online via the Open Access Repository include:

Community Media Overview of Information Literacy Early Childhood Education

 

Safeguarding Facing the Cahllenges Innovative ways

Paperity : multidisciplinary aggregator of OA journals & papers

With the beginning of the new academic year, Paperity, the first multidisciplinary aggregator of Open Access journals and papers, has been launched. Paperity will connect authors with readers, boost dissemination of new discoveries and consolidate academia around open literature.

Right now, Paperity (http://paperity.org/) includes over 160,000 open articles, “gold” and “hybrid”, from 2,000 scholarly journals, and growing. The goal of the team is to cover – with the support of journal editors and publishers – 100% of Open Access literature in 3 years from now. In order to achieve this, Paperity utilizes an original technology for article indexing, designed by Marcin Wojnarski, a data geek from Poland and a medalist of the International Mathematical Olympiad. This technology indexes only true peer-reviewed scholarly papers and filters out irrelevant entries, which easily make it into other aggregators and search engines.

The amount of scholarly literature has grown enormously in the last decades. Successful dissemination became a big issue. New tools are needed to help readers access vast amounts of literature dispersed all over the web and to help authors reach their target audience. Moreover, research is interdisciplinary now and scholars need broad access to literature from many fields, also from outside of their core research area. This is the reason why Paperity covers all subjects, from Sciences, Technology, Medicine, through Social Sciences, to Humanities and Arts.

There are lots of great articles out there which report new significant findings, yet attract no attention, only because they are hard to find. No more than top 10% of research institutions have good access to communication channels and can share their findings efficiently. The remaining 90%, especially authors from developing countries and early-career researchers, start from a much lower stand and often stay unnoticed despite high quality of their work – says Wojnarski. He adds that it is not by accident that Paperity partners right now with the EU Contest for Young Scientists, the biggest science fair in Europe. With the help of Paperity, the Contest wants to improve dissemination of discoveries authored by its participants – top young talents from all over the continent.

Paperity is the first service of this kind. The most similar existing website, PubMed Central, aggregates open journals, too, but is limited to life sciences alone. Another related service, the Directory of Open Access Journals, does index articles from multiple periodicals and different disciplines, but does not provide aggregation, only pure indexing: it shows metadata of articles, but for fulltext access redirects to external sites. Moreover, both PMC and DOAJ impose strict technical requirements on participating journals, which limits the scope of aggregation. Paperity adapts to whatever technology a given periodical employs.