JSTOR Arts & Science XIII Archive Collection

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z: JSTOR Arts & Science XIII Archive Collection

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“late byzantine cross-in-square” by fusion-of-horizons (on Flickr)

From the JSTOR website:

“The Arts & Sciences XIII Collection adds an increasingly international set of journals in disciplines including Language & Literature, Art & Art History, Philosophy, and Religion. Represented subdisciplines include European church history and the literature of the American West.

The collection offers a global scope. European countries including Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands each contribute several titles, with an additional title published in South Korea, the Journal of Korean Religions.

The Arts & Sciences XIII Collection also complements JSTOR content in History, Music, and Classical Studies. The collection will contain at least 125 titles by completion.”

Notable titles include:

A full title list for the package can be found on the JSTOR website.

Access the various titles from JSTOR Arts & Science XIII Archive Collection via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z. Records for the titles in this archive will be available in LibrarySearch in the new year. Access to the articles will be available in LibrarySearch+ next week.

JSTOR Arts & Science XI Archive Collection

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z: JSTOR Arts & Science XI Archive Collection

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‘Language of the birds’ by David Yu (on Flikr)

From the JSTOR website:

“Arts & Sciences XI will expand JSTOR’s coverage in the humanities, with scholarship in core fields of Language & Literature, History, and Art & Art History.

Comprising a minimum of 125 titles, the collection will  include important journals in Classical Studies, Architecture & Architectural History, and Music.

Other discipline clusters will include Bibliography, Library Science, Religion, Philosophy, Archaeology, Performing Arts, Film Studies, and Linguistics.

Interdisciplinary titles will broaden the scope of the collection to include area studies such as American studies, Asian studies, Jewish studies, and African American studies.”

Notable titles include:

A full title list for the package can be found on the JSTOR website.

Access the various titles from JSTOR Arts & Science XI Archive Collection via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z. Records for the titles in this archive will be available in LibrarySearch in the new year. Access to the articles will be available in LibrarySearch+ next week.

Grey Room

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : GREY ROOM.

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From the MIT website for the journal:

Grey Room brings together scholarly and theoretical articles from the fields of architecture, art, media, and politics to forge a cross-disciplinary discourse uniquely relevant to contemporary concerns.

“Publishing some of the most interesting and original work within these disciplines, Grey Room has positioned itself at the forefront of the most current aesthetic and critical debates. Featuring original articles, translations, interviews, dossiers, and academic exchanges, Grey Room‘s emphasis on aesthetic practice and historical and theoretical discourse appeals to a wide range of readers, including architects, artists, scholars, students, and critics.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from issue 1 (2000) to present.

Access Grey Room via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘The Three Towers’ by mhx on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/rMqbwW

Renaissance studies

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : backfile: RENAISSANCE STUDIES

From the Wiley Online website for the journal:

Renaissance Studies is a multi-disciplinary journal which publishes articles and editions of documents on all aspects of Renaissance history and culture. The articles range over the history, art, architecture, religion, literature, and languages of Europe during the period. Editions of important documents appear in their original languages, with introduction, textual apparatus, notes and (occasionally) translations of the documents and sources into English. The journal also contains a substantial book reviews section and often illustrated reviews of major exhibitions worldwide. “

Backfile now available to the University of Cambridge electronically – in addition to the current content already available – from volume 1 (1987) to volume 10 (1996).

Access Renaissance Studies via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: Wikipedia  – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Renaissance

V&A Collection

Victoria & Albert Museum’s Collections database allows you to perform searches of over 293,000 images in objects in the V&A collection.

V&A special collection The database includes over 1.1 million catalogue records as well as the image collection. Make sure you opt for the ‘Only records with images’ option before performing your search if you do not want to see results without images.

 

V&AThe images are also grouped by collection. For instance, you can view illustrations and photographs of toys, children’s stories, clothes, and more in the ‘Collection: Museum of Childhood’.

You can also perform searches on all the tags of an image, which include materials, techniques, place of origin, names, galleries, and category (includes porcelain, ceramics, textiles, etc.).

Each time the homepage is visited the selection of images changes which offers a great way to explore random elements of the collection.

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

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From the Taylor & Francis website for the journal:

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics covers all aspects of the graphic novel, comic strip and comic book focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries. The emphasis is on the production and consumption of comics in their cultural, institutional and creative contexts.

“The journal aims to reflect not only standard forms such as the superhero and other genres of the comic book, but also the increasing interest in modern forms and emerging genres of the comic, for instance, medicine, psychology and, autobiography. Our scope is international, covering not only English language comics but also worldwide comic culture, recently featuring articles about European, Indian, Japanese and Korean comics. We would like to extend into other comic cultures in Australia, Africa, South America and Scandinavia.

“We are interested in the production and consumption of comics and their context within culture and the mass media, for instance within promotional culture, digital technologies and fandom. The journal aims to reflect and encourage the widest breadth of approaches to the comic, as a mass medium, and its associated forms.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2010) to present.

Access Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics will be via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: REMEMBER WHOSE BRAINS PLANNED THAT JOB! (1951) #machinegun #comics by Kich Anfoly on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/p3s4AD

Early European Books Collections 3 and 4

The University Library is delighted to announce that the JISC has negotiated with ProQuest to make available to UK HE institutions collections 1-4 of the Early European Books resource.   This extends the access for Cambridge to include collections 3 and 4.

Collection 3 is substantially larger than the previous collections, containing 3 million pages in total, from more than 10,000 volumes scanned at four different libraries. It encompasses works in all major European languages, printed in the cities which led the explosion of the print industry in the early modern era, such as Nuremberg, Basel, Leiden, Paris and Venice. This breadth of scope gives a wide-ranging overview of the intellectual life and historical upheavals of early modern Europe. The collection contains the founding works of modern sciences such as botany, anatomy and astrology, together with accounts of travel, exploration and warfare, and influential works of literature, philosophy and humanist thought. In the field of religion, users will find editions of the works of the Church Fathers, early Bible editions in Latin, Greek, Hebrew and vernacular translations, missals, psalters and breviaries, Protestant sermons and tracts, and Counter-Reformation publications of the Catholic Church.

The volumes for Collection 3 are taken from the following libraries:

  • Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze (National Central Library of Florence, Italy)
  • Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands)
  • The Wellcome Library, London
  • Det Kongelige Bibliotek (Royal Library, Copenhagen)

Highlights of Collection 3 include:

  • History of Science: the Wellcome Library’s collection ranges from scholarly editions and translations of the works of Galen, Galileo, Dioscorides, Fuchs and Aldrovandi to books on alchemy, demonology, falconry and cookery (La Varenne’s Le cuisinier françois, 1656, is the founding text of modern French cuisine), so-called books of secrets (containing recipes for medicines and household remedies, including Latin, Italian, Spanish and German editions of Alessio Piemontese’s De Secretis) and books of prodigies (such as Pierre Boaistuau’s illustrated catalogue of monsters, demons, deformities, natural disasters and miraculous events, Histoires prodigieuses, 1568).
  • Philosophy: works by René Descartes (Principia Philosophiae, 1644; Les Passions de l’ame, 1650), Baruch Spinoza (editions of the Tractatus theologico-politicus in Latin, 1670 and French, 1678) and key humanist and Renaissance authors.
  • History: pamphlets from the Koninklijke Bibliotheek relating to the Dutch Revolt against Spanish rule, the persecution of the Huguenots, and the assassination of William of Orange.
  • Fine art and illustrations: Albrecht Dürer’s Four Books on Human Proportion (Arnhem, 1622), and volumes with engravings by Jacob de Gheyn (Waffenhandlvng, or The Exercise of Arms; Amsterdam, 1608), Johan Bara (Emblemata amatoria, Netherlands, c.1620) and Jöst Amman (Panoplia, Frankfurt, 1568).
  • Fine examples of the art of printing, from Nicolas Jenson’s Venetian imprints of the 1470s and examples of Dutch ‘prototypography’, to Christophe’s Plantin’s prolifically illustrated editions of Monardes’ survey of plants of the New World (1574) and the House of Elzevir’s editions of the Classics and the Greek New Testament (Leiden, 1624).
  • The Age of Exploration: several editions of Theodor de Bry’s America (from 1595 onwards), and Joannes de Laet’s History of the New World (Leiden, 1625), together with surveys, chronicles and illustrated natural histories of Brazil, Peru, Ethiopia, India, Persia and the Portuguese East Indies (in Spanish, Italian, French, Dutch and Latin).
  • Literary works from throughout Europe, including Molière’s L’avare (Paris, 1693), Torquato Tasso’s Gierusalemme liberata (Paris, 1678), Sebastian Brant’s Ship of Fools (Latin edition; Basel, 1498), Juan de Mena’s Las trescientas (Seville, 1499), Joost van Vondel’s Maria Stuart (1647) and Philipp von Zesen’s Adriatische Rosemund (1645).
  • Like its immediate predecessor, Collection 4 contains almost 3 million pages and includes works from the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze (BNCF), the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Wellcome Library and the Kongelige Bibliotek; in addition, Collection 4 sees the first inclusion of volumes (c.1,700) from the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF).

Works from the BnF in Collection 4 include the first Protestant Bible in French (published in Lyon in 1544) as well as editions and translations of the Fathers of the Church, bearing testimony to the importance of the Christian Humanist movement in France, in the wake of Erasmus. A number of works also illuminate the rites and ceremonies of religious life: the celebration of festivals such as Christmas, marriage and funeral rites, practices relating to prayer, fasting, giving alms and processions. Texts of laws and regulations, as well as editions of the customs of the French provinces, jurisprudential treatises on specific matters (such as contract law or feudal law, etc.) and compendia of jurisprudence along with their commentaries also feature. Philosophy is represented by, amongst others, Plato’s Republic and contemporary works such as the Six books of the Republic by Jean Bodin as well as French translations of Italian authors such as Machiavelli and Giovanni Botero (a leading theorist of the ‘raison d’Etat’ at the end of the 16th century).

The contents of Collection 4 as a whole are as wide-ranging as previous collections, including important works of science, art, medicine, travel and popular miscellanies from the Wellcome Library (including many items from William Morris’s personal collection), scholarly works of history and theology from the BNCF, literary translations and legal texts from the Netherlands’ Koninklijke Bibliotheek (including a substantial number of volumes from the Elzevir press), and texts relating to the Reformation from the Kongelige Bibliotek in Copenhagen.