New eresource – Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500-1926

Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500-1926 has been acquired from the legacy of Dr. Mark Kaplanoff, Fellow of Pembroke College, who endowed the University Library with funds to support the study of the history of the United States in the University of Cambridge.

Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500–1926 offers a perspective on life in the western hemisphere, encompassing the arrival of the Europeans on the shores of North America in the late fifteenth century to the first decades of the twentieth century.

Covering more than 400 years and more than 65,000 volumes in North, Central, and South America and the West Indies, this easy-to-use digital collection highlights the society, politics, religious beliefs, culture, contemporary opinions, and momentous events of the time through sermons, political tracts, newspapers, books, pamphlets, maps, legislation, literature, and more.

This digital collection, drawn from Joseph Sabin’s famed bibliography, Bibliotheca Americana: A Dictionary of Books Relating to America from Its Discovery to the Present Time, includes the following topics:

  • Discovery and exploration of the Americas — accounts from British, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, and Danish explorers and adventurers
  • Colonization — features both American and European views and firsthand accounts of colonial life
  • Slavery — memoirs, original speeches, lectures, sermons, discourses, reports to legislatures across America, pamphlets, books, and international essays
  • Cities and states — the social and political evolution of America’s major cities and states
  • Civil War — a wide array of memoirs, political tracts, published legislative proceedings, and broadsides
  • Reconstruction — records that describe the reorganization and re-establishment of the seceded states in the Union after the Civil War
  • American women — education, civil rights, domestic life, and employment
  • Native Americans — essays, booklets, treaties, land tracts, congressional speeches, journals, and letters that document social attitudes and personal experiences
  • Immigration — pamphlets, broadsides, speeches, articles, and books
  • Constitution — pamphlets, letters, speeches, and essays provide detailed information about the early political organization of the American colonies

Image by Abhay Bharadwaj from Pixabay

North American Women’s Letters and Diaries – Trial access

Trial access to North American Women’s Letters and Diaries is available to 23 April 2022 for Cambridge University members via this link.

Please tell us about your use of this resource and if you want continued access to it via this feedback form.

This collection includes the immediate experiences of 1,325 women and 150,000 pages of diaries and letters. Particular care has been taken to index this material so that it can be searched more thoroughly than ever before. The materials have been carefully chosen using leading bibliographies, supplemented by customer requests and more than 7,000 pages of previously unpublished material. The collection also includes biographies and an extensive annotated bibliography of the sources in the database.

Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500-1926

Trial access to Sabin Americana, History of the Americas, 1500-1926 is available to 31 May 2022 for Cambridge University members via this link.

Please tell us about your use of this resource and if you want continued access to it via this feedback form.

Sabin Americana: History of the Americas, 1500–1926 offers a perspective on life in the western hemisphere, encompassing the arrival of the Europeans on the shores of North America in the late fifteenth century to the first decades of the twentieth century.

Covering more than 400 years and more than 65,000 volumes in North, Central, and South America and the West Indies, this easy-to-use digital collection highlights the society, politics, religious beliefs, culture, contemporary opinions, and momentous events of the time through sermons, political tracts, newspapers, books, pamphlets, maps, legislation, literature, and more.

This digital collection, drawn from Joseph Sabin’s famed bibliography, Bibliotheca Americana: A Dictionary of Books Relating to America from Its Discovery to the Present Time, includes the following topics:

  • Discovery and exploration of the Americas — accounts from British, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, and Danish explorers and adventurers
  • Colonization — features both American and European views and firsthand accounts of colonial life
  • Slavery — memoirs, original speeches, lectures, sermons, discourses, reports to legislatures across America, pamphlets, books, and international essays
  • Cities and states — the social and political evolution of America’s major cities and states
  • Civil War — a wide array of memoirs, political tracts, published legislative proceedings, and broadsides
  • Reconstruction — records that describe the reorganization and re-establishment of the seceded states in the Union after the Civil War
  • American women — education, civil rights, domestic life, and employment
  • Native Americans — essays, booklets, treaties, land tracts, congressional speeches, journals, and letters that document social attitudes and personal experiences
  • Immigration — pamphlets, broadsides, speeches, articles, and books
  • Constitution — pamphlets, letters, speeches, and essays provide detailed information about the early political organization of the American colonies
Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867)

New E-Resource : Slavery and Anti-Slavery Part I-3

We are pleased to announce that Cambridge University members now have access to Slavery and Anti-Slavery Part I-3 via this direct link.

Please note we have only three of four parts published.

Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive is devoted to the study and understanding of the history of slavery in America and the rest of the world from the 17th century to the late 19th century. Archival collections were sourced from more than 60 libraries at institutions such as the Amistad Research Center, Bibliothèque nationale de France, the National Archives, Oberlin College, Oxford University, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and Yale University; these collections allow for unparalleled depth and breadth of content.

Part I: Debates over Slavery and Abolition sheds light on the abolitionist movement, the conflicts within it, the anti- and pro-slavery arguments of the period, and the debates on the subject of colonization. It explores all facets of the controversial topic, with a focus on economic, gender, legal, religious, and government issues.

Part II: Slave Trade in the Atlantic World charts the inception of slavery in Africa and its rise as perpetuated on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, placing particular emphasis on the Caribbean, Latin America, and United States. More international in scope than Part I, this collection was developed by an international editorial board with scholars specializing in North American, European, African, and Latin American/Caribbean aspects of the slave trade.

Part III: The Institution of Slavery expands the depth of coverage of the topic. Part III explores, in vivid detail, the inner workings of slavery from 1492 to 1888. Through legal documents, plantation records, first-person accounts, newspapers, government records, and other primary sources, this collection reveals how enslaved people struggled against the institution. These rare works explore slavery as a legal and labor system, the relationship between slavery and religion, freed slaves, the Shong Masacre, the Dememara insurrection, and many other aspects and events.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z.

Access to this archive is enabled initially up to 31 December 2022 only.

Early American Newspapers : trial access

Cambridge University members now have trial access to more recently published collections in the Early American Newspapers series.

Access is from 9 February to 11 March 2022 and is available via this link.

The University Library acquired collections 1 through 13 in 2019/2020. Access is now enabled to collections 14 through 21:

  • EAN, Series 14: 1807-1880: The Expansion of Urban America-Content
  • EAN, Series 15, 1822-1879: Immigrant Communities-Content
  • EAN, Series 16, 1800-1877: Industry and the Environment-Content
  • EAN, Series 17, 1844-1922: American Heartland-Content
  • EAN, Series 18: 1825-1879: Racial Awakening in the Northeast
  • Ethnic American Newspapers (Balch), 1799-1971

We want to know how you used these resources on trial, how useful they were to you, and if longer term access would be important to you. Please use this feedback form to tell us about your use and need for these digital archives. Thank you.

An essential digital record of American history, culture and daily life
This expanding digital collection of early American newspapers is the most extensive resource of its kind. Currently featuring more than 6,000 titles from all 50 states and Washington, D.C., Early American Newspapers provides an unparalleled record of daily life in hundreds of diverse American communities. Through eyewitness reporting, editorials, legislative updates, letters, poetry, advertisements, election returns, matrimony and death notices, maps, cartoons, illustrations and more, these historical newspapers offer researchers essential local and national perspectives on American history, culture and daily life across three centuries.  Advanced capabilities allow users to search or browse by date or era, by language, by place of publication or individual title. Users can easily view, magnify, print and save digital images of whole issues, pages and individual articles. – Read more about EAN collections 14-18 on the Readex website.

Two centuries of immigrant life in the U.S.
Spanning the Early Republic’s Open Door Era to the Era of Liberalization in the mid-1960s, Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection covers two centuries of immigrant life in the United States. Nineteenth-century topics include the denial of citizenship to “nonwhites”; the founding of nativist political movements, including the anti-immigrant “Know-Nothing” party; the 1849 discovery of gold in California, which lured people from all over the world; New York City’s place as the world’s largest Irish city in 1860 with more than 200,000 Irish-born citizens; and the Immigration Act of 1882, which levied a tax on all immigrants landing at U.S. ports. – Read more about the Balch collection on the Readex website.

“Burning of Old South Church, Bath, Maine” by John Hilling, circa 1854

New Open Access E-Resource : Black Freedom Struggle in the United States

Black Freedom Struggle in the United States is a curated selection of primary sources for teaching and learning about the struggles and triumphs of Black Americans.

black freedom-1

The Black Freedom Struggle website will include more than 2,000 documents curated around six crucial phases of the U.S. Black freedom struggle:

  • Resistance to slavery by enslaved persons and the abolitionist movement of the 19th century
  • The end of slavery during the Civil War and the Reconstruction Era
  • The fight against Jim Crow segregation
  • The New Deal and World War II
  • The Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Movement from 1946-1975
  • …and the contemporary Black experience since 1976.

This new open access website has been set up with the intention of supporting a wide range of students, independent researchers and anyone interested in learning more about the foundation of ongoing racial injustice in the US and the fights against it.

Also available to access via the Databases A-Z .

Trial access – American Religion: Denominational Newspapers (Readex)

Trial access to American Religion : Denominational Newspapers is now active and will run until 31 May 2021.

Please tell us what you think about these archives by completing the trial feedback form here. Thank you.

Exclusive focus on American denominational newspapers during the age of religion  

More than 320 newspapers from 30-plus states, all published between 1799 and 1900 

Important commentary on such social issues as slavery, women’s suffrage and the Temperance movement  

More information about this collection here.

New eresources: Early American Imprints – Evans

Three Readex Early American Imprints databases have been acquired from the legacy of Dr. Mark Kaplanoff, Fellow of Pembroke College, who endowed the University Library with funds to support the study of the history of the United States in the University of Cambridge.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800, has been hailed as the definitive resource for teaching and researching nearly every aspect of 17th- and 18th-century America. This incomparable digital collection contains virtually every book, pamphlet and broadside published in America over a 160-year period. Providing complete digital editions of nearly 38,000 printed works, Series I covers subjects ranging from history, literature and culture to politics, government and society.

Early American Imprints, Series I, is comprised of a vast range of publication types. Among the genres included are advertisements, allegories, almanacs, autobiographies, ballads, bibles, captivity narratives, cookbooks, diaries, elegies, eulogies, hymns, imaginary voyages, narratives, novels, operas, plays, poems, primers, sermons, songs, speeches, textbooks, tracts, travel literature and many others.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Supplement from the Library Company of Philadelphia, 1670-1800

Fully integrated with Early American Imprints: Evans, this Supplement includes items that are relevant to a host of humanities topics and are representative of numerous genres of colonial print, many emanating from the middle and lower orders of society. The fragile bound books, as a result of their popularity, are generally unknown today because they were read repeatedly until they disintegrated. Among these are guide books to the perplexities of life, which served to shape individual and community identities. The pamphlets, often containing writing of considerable significance, present sermons, religious tracts, political arguments, reports of organized bodies and other influential items. The broadsides—which capture a slice of life, unedited for posterity— include doggerel ballads, advertisements, official decrees, news extras, amateur elegies and more.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Supplement from the American Antiquarian Society, 1652-1800

This extensive collection is comprised entirely of works that fall into the scope of the original Evans and Bristol bibliographies (which formed the basis of Early American Imprints, Series 1: Evans, 1639-1800) but were either missed by Evans and Bristol, or were listed by Evans and Bristol but could not be found until now. For today’s students and scholars of early America, no other collection offers the opportunity to view previously unknown publications from the first 150 years of American history. Broad subject areas covered by these works include the Atlantic World, Cartography, Colonial History, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, Literature, Music, Revolutionary War and Sociology. The materials cover a wide range of important document types: histories, personal narratives, military records, government acts, expedition logs, treaties, maps, almanacs, children’s primers, criminal confessions, recipe books, poems, songs and speeches.

Records will be made available in iDiscover for titles in this collections.

Image credit Image by Michal Jarmoluk from Pixabay

 

New e-resources: Oxford Research Encyclopedias

Authored by the experts, Oxford Research Encylcopedia articles deliver in-depth thinking & analysis of a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, and on emerging themes in the sciences.

The Oxford Research Encyclopedias (OREs) offer long-form overview articles written, peer-reviewed, and edited by leading scholars. Cambridge University members now have access online to all the OREs published.

The OREs cover both foundational and cutting-edge topics in order to develop, over time, an anchoring knowledge base for major areas of research across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.

Cambridge University now has access to all the OREs which currently comprise the following subjects: African history; American history; Anthropology; Asian history; Business & Management; Climate science; Communication; Criminology and Criminal justice; Economics and finance; Education; Social work; Environmental science; Global public health; International studies; Latin American history; Linguistics; Literature; Natural hazard science; Neuroscience; Physics; Planetary science; Politics; Psychology; Religion.

These online encyclopaedias have been made available through special funding provided by the University to support teaching and learning impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and the unavailability of library resources on campus.

Trial access to new text mining tool : Readex Text Explorer (access until 30 June 2020)

University of Cambridge registered students and staff now have access to a new text and data mining tool from Readex called ‘Readex Text Explorer‘. This tool can be used to text mine three new collections (see below) until 30 June 2020.

Please send your feedback using this online form.

The three new collections on trial are:

American Sermons

This database covers a range of topics such as slavery and abolition, crime and sin, theology and religion, women and children, clerical and government leaders, holidays, entertainment and rites.

American Childrens Books

This database covers many topical categories such as education, race and ethnicity, conduct and manners, literary characters, labor, death and mortality, natural history and religion.

Native American Indians

This database covers many topics such as Native American displacement, literature, relations with pioneers and the government, tribes and nations, languages and treaties.

 

The Readex Text Explorer is a tool Readex has been developing which includes Voyant at its core, but the entire workflow—from text selection forward—is custom-built for Readex.  It allows users to:

  • find texts
  • choose texts to create a corpus/sample set
  • run exploration/analysis scripts against the corpus
  • change and revise the corpus on demand
  • export the results

 

How to use this tool on the Native American Indians database:

  • Open the database
  • Search in Suggested Searches on Wars and Conflicts
  • Narrow to French and Indian War
  • Select the first ten texts
  • EXPLORE!
  • View Snapshot
  • Reveal most common terms (use either Cirrus or Terms view in upper left panel)
  • Draw initial conclusions about most common concerns reflected in this corpus (land, water, people, Britain, France)
  • Change text views to modify exploration (eg, by phrase, or document, etc.)
  • Change Visualizations
  • Change Segmentations
  • Export your work

More information about this tool is available here.