European Views of the Americas: 1493 to 1750

European Views of the Americas: 1493 to 1750

is now available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z here:

http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/go.php?c=24018434

This is an authoritative bibliography that is well-known and respected by scholars worldwide. The database contains more than 32,000 entries and is a comprehensive guide to printed records about the Americas written in Europe before 1750. It covers the history of European exploration as well as portrayals of Native American peoples.

The database is derived from the seminal reference work, European Americana: A Chronological Guide to Works Printed in Europe Relating to the Americas, 1493-1750. Commonly known as the Alden-Landis bibliography (after the co-editors John Alden and Dennis Landis), this reference work features documents produced in Europe that make some mention of the discovery and emerging awareness of the Americas. The work is arranged in chronological order across six volumes. The database is searchable by every category of information found within the printed volumes and will be an invaluable resource for researchers interested in the subject.

By Michelle Walz Eriksson – originally posted to Flickr as View of Haitian Landscape, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8689804

U.S. Declassified Documents, the new Declassified Documents Reference System

The Declassified Documents Reference System (DDRS) is now known as U.S. Declassified Documents and can be accessed here:

http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/cambuni?db=USDD

U.S. Declassified Documents can also be searched via the Gale Artemis platform

Links in the eresources@cambridge A-Z and the LibGuides A-Z have been updated accordingly.

To search the U.S. Declassifed Documents resource only, click on the “Searching 10 of 10 databases” tab, untick the “Check all” tick box and tick just the “U.S. Declassified Documents Online” tick box (bottom right).   You can filter search results by document type, classification level, publication year and by other categories.  Results can be analysed using the built-in Term Frequency and Term Clusters tools.

U.S. Declassified Documents Online provides immediate access to a broad range of previously classified federal records spanning the twentieth and twenty first centuries. The collection brings together the most sensitive documents from all the presidential libraries and numerous executive agencies in a single, easily searchable database. The search and discovery interface for the collection allows researchers to locate the full text of documents and quickly filter their search results by document type, issue date, source institution, classification level, and date declassified as well as other document characteristics.

The collection is the most comprehensive compilation of declassified documents from the executive branch. The types of materials include intelligence studies, policy papers, diplomatic correspondence, cabinet meeting minutes, briefing materials, and domestic surveillance and military reports. The collection editors have actively monitored the release of formerly classified documents from presidential libraries. They have also added numerous major releases of declassified documents from the Department of State, Department of Defense, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other executive agencies.

Because the majority of the documents are presidential records and all of them were formerly classified, these records provide a unique, behind-the-scenes view of the highest level of American policymaking on the most sensitive issues of national security and foreign policy. Materials cover virtually every significant foreign policy development and international crisis, from the years leading up to the First World War through the end of the Cold War. Topics include the outbreak and course of the Second World War, the end of colonialism in the global south, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, U.S. relations with non-aligned states in the 1960s, U.S.-Soviet relations in the era of détente, international trade, nuclear proliferation, conflict in the Middle East, and the War on Terrorism. The collection also traces important sources on sensitive episodes within the United States such as domestic surveillance, the civil rights and anti-war movements, abuse of government power, and home-grown terrorism.

The declassification of government documents occurs slowly and unpredictably and USDDO allows researchers to readily find the latest releases. To get the most out of this collection, it is helpful to understand generally how the federal government has handled classified materials. There are three basic levels of classification for national security information: confidential, secret, and top secret. The test for assigning confidential classification is whether its unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause damage to the national security. Secret documents are expected to have the potential to cause serious damage. Top secret documents require the highest degree of protection and may cause exceptionally grave damage to national security. Examples of exceptionally grave damage include armed hostilities against the United States or its allies; disruption of foreign relations vitally affecting the national security; the revelation of sensitive intelligence operations; and the disclosure of scientific or technological developments vital to the national security.

When archival collections held by the National Archives and Records Administration, such as the records at the presidential libraries, are opened for research, individual classified documents are removed from these collections. Entire series of federal records are also kept closed for years because they contain a high proportion of classified items. As time passes the federal government determines when restrictions on specific classified documents are no longer warranted, and it publicly releases those records. At times classified documents are partially released with portions redacted. These declassification determinations are made both as a result of the systematic review of classified documents by the agencies that created them, guided by the priorities of the federal government, and in response to public requests for mandatory declassification review. U.S. Declassified Documents Online compiles the declassified documents, released individually or in sets, that fill in the most sensitive gaps of the historical record left by the federal government.

 

Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers

The University Library is delighted to announce members of the University now have full online access to the digital archive Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers.

The archive can be accessed via this link or via the eresources@cambridge index and subject pages or via the LibGuides A-ZTitles in the archive will also be searchable in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z and in iDiscover shortly.

The archive content can be searched alternatively via the new Artemis Primary Sources platform either in isolation or in combination with the other digital archives available from Gale Cengage licensed to the University.  Work is in progress by ProQuest to enable searching of the  full text of the archive content via iDiscover.

The archive comprises digital facsimile images of both full pages and clipped articles for hundreds of 19th century U.S. newspapers and advanced searching capabilities. For each issue, the newspaper is captured from cover-to-cover, providing access to every article, advertisement and illustration.

As compelling as it is comprehensive,  Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers provides access to primary source newspaper content from the 19th century, featuring full-text content and images from numerous newspapers from a range of urban and rural regions throughout the U.S. The collection encompasses the entire 19th century, with an emphasis on such topics as the American Civil War, African-American culture and history, Western migration and Antebellum-era life, among other subjects.

This full-text searchable, facsimile-image database makes experiencing historical events, daily life and 19th-century American culture as easy as clicking a mouse.   Nineteenth century U.S. Newspapers provides easy access to seemingly endless information and primary resources — the vast majority of which have never before been accessible online.

CAUCUS! CAUCUS!! CAUCUS!!!

Citizens of North Carolina, awake! An invasion of your liberties is threatened, and as public sentinels, we should be recreant to our trust, did we not promptly sound the tocsin of alarm. There are those at the seat of Government, who are seeking to load the people by chains, by corrupting their government, and bringing them under the surveillance of the Albany Regency.  An insidious and artful attempt has been made by some skulking birds of the night, owl-like beings, who dare not show their faces in open day to their fellow men, to dupe the Legislature of North Carolina – to draw it, by the mere force of a name, into that filthy vortex of political corruption, the caucusing system…

(United States Telegraph (Washington, DC) December 6, 1832, issue 290)

 

U.S. Declassified Documents, the new Declassified Documents Reference System

Further to our post on 3 December 2015, we are pleased to report that today the Declassified Documents Reference System has been launched and is now live on the Artemis platform from Gale Cengage.  The DDRS is now known as U.S. Declassified Documents and can be accessed here.

To search the U.S. Declassifed Documents resource only, click on the “Searching 10 of 10 databases” tab, untick the “Check all” tick box and tick just the “U.S. Declassified Documents Online” tick box (bottom right).

The U.S. Declassified Documents can now be cross-searched with the other archive resources on the Artemis platform.  You can filter search results by document type, classification level, publication year and by other categories.  Results can be analysed using the built-in Term Frequency and Term Clusters tools.

Government documents constitute a significant resource for researchers in almost every discipline.  Limitations on the access to this information, severely restricts our understanding of the development of domestic and foreign policies. U.S. Declassified Documents makes it possible for researchers to easily and quickly access and review selected previously classified government documents online.

This digital collection fills an important gap in post-World War II domestic and foreign policy studies and provides unique opportunities for undergraduate and graduate comprehensive research in a rich primary source.  In addition, U.S. Declassified Documents provides basic research for journalism, public policy studies, international law and security, and other disciplines.

The cartoon above represents post-war Europe, for a full explanation on the cartoon visit this link. Cartoonist: Woop, Date 27th September 1947 –

Nineteenth Century US Newspapers

Trial access is now available to Nineteenth Century US Newspapers.

Access the trial via this URL: http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/cambuni?db=NCNP

The trial ends on 15 December 2015.

Please note that this content will be available through Artemis Primary Sources, Gale’s new research platform. Please find direct access to Artemis through the following link: http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/cambuni?db=GDC

Please send your feedback on the trial to lw213@cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.

From the Afro-American Churchman (Petersburg, Virginia), November 1, 1887, Issue 17:

“Niagara Falls Dry for a Day” … The singular syncope of the waters lasted all the day, and night closed over the strange scene …

American Periodicals

New on eresources@cambridge A-Z & ejournals@cambridge A-Z : American Periodicals database

American Periodicals is a database of full text and page images of American magazines, journals and newspapers published from colonial days to the dawn of the 20th century.  That is, titles beginning publication between 1740 and 1900 with coverage through 1940.

Titles range from Benjamin Franklin’s General Magazine and America’s first scientific journal, Medical Repository; popular magazines such as Vanity Fair and Ladies’ Home Journal; regional and niche publications; and groundbreaking journals like The DialPuck, and McClure’s. Read an in-depth desription of American Periodicals.  In summary, the database comprises:

  • 89 journals published between 1740 and 1800 offer insights into America’s transition from colonial times to independence. The journals support research for a range of academic fields. Titles include Massachusetts Magazine, which published America’s first short stories, and Thomas Paine’s Pennsylvania Magazine, which reported on inventions. One of the first mass printings of the Declaration of Independence, a letter by George Washington on the crucial Battle of Trenton, and the thoughts of Benjamin Franklin are among the highlights of content from this period.
  • The first 60 years of the 19th century became the golden age of American periodicals, with general interest magazines, children’s publications, and more than 20 journals for women. Many of the publications reflect on the growing debate over slavery, including the serialization of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in National Era that preceded the novel. Also available are hard-to-find materials, such as Edgar Allan Poe’s contributions to the Southern Literary Messenger, as well as the first appearances of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s stories in New England Magazine, and Margaret Fuller’s contributions to The Dial.
  • 118 periodicals published during the Civil War (1861-1865) and Reconstruction (1865-1877) eras reflect the nation in turmoil and growth, and titles from the 1880s through 1900 capture the settling of the West and the emergence of modern America. Early professional journals, including Publications of the American Economic Association and Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, popular titles such as Scribner’s and Lippincott’s issued by publishing houses, celebrations of Americana in Ladies’ Home Journal, and the incisive political and social commentary of Puck and McClure’s illustrate the variety of the American experience.

Access American Periodicals via the eresources@cambridge A-Z or at this link

The periodical titles in the American Periodicals database are listed also in the ejournals@cambridge A-Z.

You may also be interested in Making of America Journals and Chronicling America : Historic American Newspapers.