Trial access to Oxford Research Encyclopaedias

Trial access is now enabled up to 30 November 2019 for the following disciplines from Oxford Research Encyclopaedias:

African History
Education
Literature
American History
Encyclopedia of Social Work
Natural Hazard Science
Asian History
Environmental Science
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Climate Science
International Studies
Politics
Communication
Latin American History
Psychology
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Linguistics
Religion

Please tell us what you think about these e-resources by completing the feedback form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New resources for American history

Cambridge University Library and the Seeley Historical Library are delighted to announce three major new acquisitions of online archives for the study of American history in the University.

From June 2019 the University has access (on and off campus) to the Congressional Research Digital Collection, the Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection, and the Chicago Tribune in the Historical Newspapers series, all published by ProQuest, via the following links.

To promote the new resources in your library download and print the “New eResources in American History” A3 format poster.

 

Congressional Research Digital Collection

The CRDC is a collection of research materials – CRS Reports and Committee Prints – created for Congress.

CRS, the Congressional Research Service, is known as research arm of the United States Congress.  CRS issues thousands of reports each year on issues of interest to Congress.

Committee prints are publications pre­pared for the use of a specific committee so often are working stud­ies or compilations of articles prepared in the course of formulating legislation.

This material is often the first place you’ll find topics in the news, and because prints or reports might review pending legislation, or a government program, you’ll find them issued throughout the legislative process.   Material in CRDC can be used for many purposes:  to answer a reference question, create a chronology of events, to come up to speed on a topic, or to see what a proposal was at a specific point in time.

For more help on searching the CRDC visit the ProQuest LibGuide here.

The Congressional Research Digital Collection is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection

The Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection comprises the Congressional Record (beginning in 1873 and currently available through 2009), and the predecessor titles including the Congressional Globe (1833-1873), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Annals of Congress (1789-1824).

Help with searching the Congressional Record can be found on the Advanced Search Techniques section of the ProQuest LibGuide here.  ProQuest is currently re-designing the Congressional platform to improve its search capabilities and the “Congress in Context” feature.  For updates on the development over summer 2019 see this page.

The Congressional Record Permanent Digital Collection is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Tribune provided detailed accounts of the Great Fire of 1871, which killed hundreds, nearly destroyed the city, resulted in many reforms, and spurred new growth. In 1893 and 1909, the newspaper’s special Chicago Jubilee issues described and celebrated the city’s tremendous progress. It also reported on the Progressive Movement, followed the works of Nobel Peace Prize-winning social reformer Jane Addams, exposed the activities of mobsters like Al Capone, and reported on the city’s machine politics. To incisively convey ideas, opinions, and emotions, the Chicago Tribune relied on Pulitzer Prizewinning John T. McCutcheon’s editorial cartoons.

Readers can study the progression of issues over time by browsing issues of the Chicago Tribune, which offers coverage of 1849-1995, including news articles, photos, advertisements, classified ads, obituaries, cartoons, and more.

The Chicago Tribune is findable via iDiscover, the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z, the eresources Overseas and foreign language newspapers page, and the Newspapers LibGuide.

 

A flavour of the Congressional Research Digital Collection

Buzz salutes the U.S. Flag. (Wikimedia Commons)

“I believe we should go to the moon.” — President Kennedy, May 25, 1961, 87-1 (1961), HOUSE: VOLUME 107; (8877-8915) P. 8877.  Permalink.

 

More resources in American history

The study of American history is also supported by the University Library’s provision of access to the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post in the Historial Newspapers series and the 19th century United States Newspapers archive and the Early American Newspapers archive, as well as the United States Declassified Documents Online service:

New York Times

Wall Street Journal

Washington Post

19th century U.S. Newspapers Archive

Early American Newspapers Archive

United States Declassified Documents Online

For other resources in American politics and history, please visit the Cambridge LibGuides A-Z page here.  And the Seeley Historical Library Tripos pages here and here.

America’s Historical Newspapers : Early American Newspapers Series 1-13

The University Library is delighted to announce the acquisition of all 13 series of the Early American Newspapers collection published by Readex.

The EAN is the single most comprehensive online resource for searching and browsing early American newspapers, comprising thousands of fully searchable historical newspapers from all 50 states and Washington, D.C., searchable by series, by place of publication, by era or by decade

Access this new resource at this URL on or off campus or via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

As the first draft of history, American newspapers have preserved essential records and detailed accounts of the people, issues and events that shaped the nation for hundreds of years. In the 1800s, American newspapers were often published by small-town printers and reflected the interests and values of the communities they served. But as the country grew and changed, so too did its newspapers. In the 19th century, the number of titles published rose dramatically, and newspapers were transformed by an increasing emphasis on society, industry, scientific advances, investigative journalism and human-interest stories. By the early 20th century, nearly every town in the United States had its own newspaper.

An essential digital record of American history, culture and daily life

Early American newspapers is the most extensive resource of its kind. Currently featuring more than 2,000 titles from all 50 states and Washington, D.C., Early American Newspapers provides an unparalleled record of daily life in hundreds of diverse American communities. Through eyewitness reporting, editorials, legislative updates, letters, poetry, advertisements, election returns, matrimony and death notices, maps, cartoons, illustrations and more, these historical newspapers offer researchers essential local and national perspectives on American history, culture and daily life across three centuries.  Advanced capabilities allow users to search or browse by date or era, by language, by place of publication or individual title. Users can easily view, magnify, print and save digital images of whole issues, pages and individual articles.

 

More than 90 sources and superior bibliographic control

Early American Newspapers has been created through partnerships with the American Antiquarian Society, the Library of Congress, the Wisconsin Historical Society and more than 90 other institutions. This joint effort has led to the creation of a historical newspaper collection of unparalleled breadth and depth. A distinguished academic advisory board guides the title selection process.

 

Journal of American Ethnic History

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of American Ethnic History

From the JSTOR website for the journal:

“Journal of American Ethnic History addresses various aspects of American immigration and ethnic history, including background of emigration, ethnic and racial groups, Native Americans, immigration policies, and the processes of acculturation. Each issue contains articles, review essays and single book reviews. There are also occasional sections on “Research Comments” (short articles that furnish important information for the field, a guide to further research or other significant historical items that will stimulate discussion and inquiry) and “Teaching and Outreach” (essays which focus on innovative teaching methods or outreach efforts). The journal has also published special issues on particular responses from authors on specific topics.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from the JSTOR Complete Current Scholarship platform from volume 19 (1999) to present. Access from vol 1 (1981) to volume 18 (1998) is available from the JSTOR Arts & Sciences V platform .

Access Journal of American Ethnic History via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘A native American chief’ by scott1346  on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/5KmqtG

Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française.

From the Erudit website for the journal:

La Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française est consacrée à l’histoire du Québec, du Canada français et de l’Amérique française. Cette définition inclut l’étude des relations avec d’autres groupements et les travaux de nature comparative. Les pages de la revue sont également ouvertes aux réflexions méthodologiques et théoriques sur l’histoire moderne et contemporaine. La revue publie des articles, des bilans historiographiques, des notes de recherche, des notes critiques et des comptes rendus, qui contribuent au progrès de la connaissance historique. À l’occasion, par exemple à la suite de congrès ou de colloques, elle peut éditer des numéros spéciaux thématiques. La revue ne publie que des textes en français.

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from the Erudit platform from volume 1, 1947 to the present.

Access Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Old Quebec’ by mariusz kluzniak on Flickr -https://www.flickr.com/photos/39997856@N03/9124283658/sizes/l/

European Views of the Americas: 1493 to 1750

European Views of the Americas: 1493 to 1750

is now available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z here:

http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/go.php?c=24018434

This is an authoritative bibliography that is well-known and respected by scholars worldwide. The database contains more than 32,000 entries and is a comprehensive guide to printed records about the Americas written in Europe before 1750. It covers the history of European exploration as well as portrayals of Native American peoples.

The database is derived from the seminal reference work, European Americana: A Chronological Guide to Works Printed in Europe Relating to the Americas, 1493-1750. Commonly known as the Alden-Landis bibliography (after the co-editors John Alden and Dennis Landis), this reference work features documents produced in Europe that make some mention of the discovery and emerging awareness of the Americas. The work is arranged in chronological order across six volumes. The database is searchable by every category of information found within the printed volumes and will be an invaluable resource for researchers interested in the subject.

By Michelle Walz Eriksson – originally posted to Flickr as View of Haitian Landscape, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8689804

U.S. Declassified Documents, the new Declassified Documents Reference System

The Declassified Documents Reference System (DDRS) is now known as U.S. Declassified Documents and can be accessed here:

http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/cambuni?db=USDD

U.S. Declassified Documents can also be searched via the Gale Artemis platform

Links in the eresources@cambridge A-Z and the LibGuides A-Z have been updated accordingly.

To search the U.S. Declassifed Documents resource only, click on the “Searching 10 of 10 databases” tab, untick the “Check all” tick box and tick just the “U.S. Declassified Documents Online” tick box (bottom right).   You can filter search results by document type, classification level, publication year and by other categories.  Results can be analysed using the built-in Term Frequency and Term Clusters tools.

U.S. Declassified Documents Online provides immediate access to a broad range of previously classified federal records spanning the twentieth and twenty first centuries. The collection brings together the most sensitive documents from all the presidential libraries and numerous executive agencies in a single, easily searchable database. The search and discovery interface for the collection allows researchers to locate the full text of documents and quickly filter their search results by document type, issue date, source institution, classification level, and date declassified as well as other document characteristics.

The collection is the most comprehensive compilation of declassified documents from the executive branch. The types of materials include intelligence studies, policy papers, diplomatic correspondence, cabinet meeting minutes, briefing materials, and domestic surveillance and military reports. The collection editors have actively monitored the release of formerly classified documents from presidential libraries. They have also added numerous major releases of declassified documents from the Department of State, Department of Defense, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other executive agencies.

Because the majority of the documents are presidential records and all of them were formerly classified, these records provide a unique, behind-the-scenes view of the highest level of American policymaking on the most sensitive issues of national security and foreign policy. Materials cover virtually every significant foreign policy development and international crisis, from the years leading up to the First World War through the end of the Cold War. Topics include the outbreak and course of the Second World War, the end of colonialism in the global south, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, U.S. relations with non-aligned states in the 1960s, U.S.-Soviet relations in the era of détente, international trade, nuclear proliferation, conflict in the Middle East, and the War on Terrorism. The collection also traces important sources on sensitive episodes within the United States such as domestic surveillance, the civil rights and anti-war movements, abuse of government power, and home-grown terrorism.

The declassification of government documents occurs slowly and unpredictably and USDDO allows researchers to readily find the latest releases. To get the most out of this collection, it is helpful to understand generally how the federal government has handled classified materials. There are three basic levels of classification for national security information: confidential, secret, and top secret. The test for assigning confidential classification is whether its unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause damage to the national security. Secret documents are expected to have the potential to cause serious damage. Top secret documents require the highest degree of protection and may cause exceptionally grave damage to national security. Examples of exceptionally grave damage include armed hostilities against the United States or its allies; disruption of foreign relations vitally affecting the national security; the revelation of sensitive intelligence operations; and the disclosure of scientific or technological developments vital to the national security.

When archival collections held by the National Archives and Records Administration, such as the records at the presidential libraries, are opened for research, individual classified documents are removed from these collections. Entire series of federal records are also kept closed for years because they contain a high proportion of classified items. As time passes the federal government determines when restrictions on specific classified documents are no longer warranted, and it publicly releases those records. At times classified documents are partially released with portions redacted. These declassification determinations are made both as a result of the systematic review of classified documents by the agencies that created them, guided by the priorities of the federal government, and in response to public requests for mandatory declassification review. U.S. Declassified Documents Online compiles the declassified documents, released individually or in sets, that fill in the most sensitive gaps of the historical record left by the federal government.