eHRAF: Human Relations Area Files: Archaeology & World Cultures

The University Library has arranged access to the Human Relations Area Files (eHRAF) Archaeology and World Cultures at the following links:

eHRAF World Cultures

eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database that contains descriptive information on all aspects of cultural and social life. The annually-growing eHRAF database is unique in that the information is organized by cultures and ethnic groups and every document is subject-indexed at the paragraph level, facilitating precise retrieval within documents.

eHRAF Archaeology

eHRAF Archaeology is an online cross-cultural database containing information on world’s prehistory. The annually-growing eHRAF database is organized by archaeological traditions and the documents are subject-indexed at the paragraph level. eHRAF Archaeology is a unique resource designed to facilitate comparative archaeological studies.

 

The eHRAF World Cultures is an online cross-cultural and ethnographic database containing descriptive information on cultures (based on the Outline of World Cultures -OWC) and ethnic groups from around the world. eHRAF is unique because each culture contains a variety of documents (books, articles, and dissertations) that have been subject-indexed at the paragraph level by anthropologists according to HRAF’s comprehensive Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This feature extends search capability well beyond keyword searching, allowing for precise culture and subject retrieval, even in a foreign language. As an ethnographic database, eHRAF appeals to many academic disciplines in the social sciences, humanities, medicine, and any other area with an interest in cultural diversity.

eHRAF Archaeology is an award-winning online database with information on the prehistory of the world. This database, modeled after eHRAF World Cultures, is unique in that the information is organized into archaeological traditions and the text is numerically subject-indexed according to HRAF’s modified Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM). This comprehensive subject retrieval system extends search capability well beyond keyword searching allowing for precise subject retrieval, even in foreign language texts. eHRAF Archaeology is organized by regions and archaeological traditions. View Traditions Covered for a list of traditions currently included. Each tradition consists of a general summary and documents including books, journal articles, dissertations, and manuscripts.

The archaeological database provides researchers and students access to archaeological materials for comparative studies within and across regions. Traditions are selected by random sampling from the Outline of Archaeological Traditions compiled with the help of a distinguished Board of Advisors. To encourage historical and evolutionary analysis, the traditions prior to, and following, each tradition will be included in subsequent installments.

Links to eHRAF can be found in the eresources@cambridge A-Z Resources for Archaeology and Anthropology page and in the LibGuides Databases A-Z.

 

Cambridge University Press downtime : 26 June 2016

The following platforms will all be unavailable on Sunday 26th June 2016 for 4 hours between 09:00 AM BST and 13:00 BST.

 

Cambridge Journals Online (CJO)

Cambridge Books Online (CBO)

Cambridge Histories Online (CHO)

Cambridge Companions Online (CCO)

Shakespeare Survey Online (SSO)

University Publishing Online (UPO)

 

This essential maintenance is to test the performance of systems ahead of the launch of a new academic platform later this year

BMJ Best Practice

The University Library has arranged access for the students of the Medical School to the BMJ Best Practice resource. 

BMJ BP is a “point of care” tool designed to support clinicians in their decision making from diagnosis to treatment.  It is delivered online or as the BMJ Best Practice decision support app for iOS (iPad/iPhone) and Android mobile device platforms.

Access is available on campus via this link:

http://bestpractice.bmj.com/

Or off campus via this link:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://bestpractice.bmj.com/

 

Produced by the BMJ Evidence Centre, BMJ BP aims to be a readily accessible single source for up-to-date research evidence, guidelines, and expert thought, offering an instantly available second opinion.

Entries on medical conditions consist of basic information (definitions, epidemiology, etc.), prevention, guidelines and step-by-step information for diagnosis and treatment, and follow-up recommendations.

 

Guides and promotional materials are available:

Getting started with BMJ Best Practice

Best practice poster

Decision support in your pocket poster

BP, the app

 

 

EuCLR – European Criminal Law Review

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : EuCLR – European Criminal law review.

 

“Justice and time” by Michael Foley on flickr

From the publisher website for the journal:

“The European Criminal Law Review is a journal dedicated to the development of European Criminal Law and the cooperation in criminal matters within the European Union. In these areas the Lisbon Treaty has supposedly brought about the most important changes and also the greatest challenges for the future.

It is the journal’s ambition to provide a primary forum for comprehensive discussion and critical analysis of all questions arising in relation to European Criminal Law.”

It is now available online to the University of Cambridge from volume 1 (2011) to present.

Access EuCLR – European Criminal Law Review via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

U.S. Declassified Documents, the new Declassified Documents Reference System

The Declassified Documents Reference System (DDRS) is now known as U.S. Declassified Documents and can be accessed here:

http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/cambuni?db=USDD

U.S. Declassified Documents can also be searched via the Gale Artemis platform

Links in the eresources@cambridge A-Z and the LibGuides A-Z have been updated accordingly.

To search the U.S. Declassifed Documents resource only, click on the “Searching 10 of 10 databases” tab, untick the “Check all” tick box and tick just the “U.S. Declassified Documents Online” tick box (bottom right).   You can filter search results by document type, classification level, publication year and by other categories.  Results can be analysed using the built-in Term Frequency and Term Clusters tools.

U.S. Declassified Documents Online provides immediate access to a broad range of previously classified federal records spanning the twentieth and twenty first centuries. The collection brings together the most sensitive documents from all the presidential libraries and numerous executive agencies in a single, easily searchable database. The search and discovery interface for the collection allows researchers to locate the full text of documents and quickly filter their search results by document type, issue date, source institution, classification level, and date declassified as well as other document characteristics.

The collection is the most comprehensive compilation of declassified documents from the executive branch. The types of materials include intelligence studies, policy papers, diplomatic correspondence, cabinet meeting minutes, briefing materials, and domestic surveillance and military reports. The collection editors have actively monitored the release of formerly classified documents from presidential libraries. They have also added numerous major releases of declassified documents from the Department of State, Department of Defense, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other executive agencies.

Because the majority of the documents are presidential records and all of them were formerly classified, these records provide a unique, behind-the-scenes view of the highest level of American policymaking on the most sensitive issues of national security and foreign policy. Materials cover virtually every significant foreign policy development and international crisis, from the years leading up to the First World War through the end of the Cold War. Topics include the outbreak and course of the Second World War, the end of colonialism in the global south, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, U.S. relations with non-aligned states in the 1960s, U.S.-Soviet relations in the era of détente, international trade, nuclear proliferation, conflict in the Middle East, and the War on Terrorism. The collection also traces important sources on sensitive episodes within the United States such as domestic surveillance, the civil rights and anti-war movements, abuse of government power, and home-grown terrorism.

The declassification of government documents occurs slowly and unpredictably and USDDO allows researchers to readily find the latest releases. To get the most out of this collection, it is helpful to understand generally how the federal government has handled classified materials. There are three basic levels of classification for national security information: confidential, secret, and top secret. The test for assigning confidential classification is whether its unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause damage to the national security. Secret documents are expected to have the potential to cause serious damage. Top secret documents require the highest degree of protection and may cause exceptionally grave damage to national security. Examples of exceptionally grave damage include armed hostilities against the United States or its allies; disruption of foreign relations vitally affecting the national security; the revelation of sensitive intelligence operations; and the disclosure of scientific or technological developments vital to the national security.

When archival collections held by the National Archives and Records Administration, such as the records at the presidential libraries, are opened for research, individual classified documents are removed from these collections. Entire series of federal records are also kept closed for years because they contain a high proportion of classified items. As time passes the federal government determines when restrictions on specific classified documents are no longer warranted, and it publicly releases those records. At times classified documents are partially released with portions redacted. These declassification determinations are made both as a result of the systematic review of classified documents by the agencies that created them, guided by the priorities of the federal government, and in response to public requests for mandatory declassification review. U.S. Declassified Documents Online compiles the declassified documents, released individually or in sets, that fill in the most sensitive gaps of the historical record left by the federal government.

 

SAGE Research Methods Online: new platform

SAGE Research Methods Online is a research methods tool created to help researchers, faculty and students with their research projects.

SAGE Research Methods Online is now available at its new platform here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://methods.sagepub.com/

The benefits of the new platform are:

  • A unified platform for text and video content, providing users with a multimedia research experience
  • A fully responsive site that will work well with all mobile phones and tablet devices
  • Improved discoverability of content, both from within the platform and from external sources
    • SAGE has improved the internal search, meaning better and more relevant results. The Methods Map has been improved, allowing users to explore method concepts with greater ease. The browse options have been enhanced to align with user needs – allowing browse by discipline, content type, and method topic.
  • A focus on modern, enjoyable design for students, faculty, researchers and librarians, based upon extensive user-testing

Links to SAGE Research Methods Online

SAGE Research Methods Online is linked from the eresources@cambridge A-Z index page and all the eresources@cambridge A-Z subject pages and from the LibGuides Databases A-Z.  Links to the individual titles in SAGE Research Methods Online are included in iDiscover.  (Just now some links are included to the SRMO Datasets content that we do not subscribe currently – these links are in the process of being removed.)

User profiles set up on the old platform

  • Your personal profile will be migrated across to the new site. When you first visit the new site, click ‘Profile’ in the top right hand corner of the page, and click ‘Reset you password’. Follow the instructions to reset your password. Once this is done you will be able to login.

Method Lists on the new site

  • All your lists will be migrated across. They will now be called Reading Lists, but will contain all the content they contained on the current site.

Saved Searches on the new site

  • These will not be available. The new site performs searches in a different manner to the current site. This means that saved searches cannot be migrated.

More about SAGE Research Methods Online 

Links over 175,000 pages of SAGE’s book, journal and reference content with search and discovery tools. Researchers can explore methods concepts to help them design research projects, understand particular methods or identify a new method, conduct their research, and write up their findings. A “methods map” facilitates finding content on methods. SAGE Research Methods contains content from over 720 books, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and handbooks, the entire “Little Green Book,” and “Little Blue Book” series. Includes a collection of case studies of real social research.

If you have any questions or problems with access, please contact ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you

Digital Karl Barth Library

Cambridge University Library, the Divinity Faculty Library, and ebooks@cambridge have collaborated to make accessible the Digital Karl Barth Library here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://bart.alexanderstreet.com

The Library features the entire corpus of Barth’s Gesamtausgabe. Published under the TVZ imprint, this definitive edition of Barth’s works in German currently comprises more than 40 volumes of sermons, letters, lectures, conversations, and academic writings. Also slated for inclusion in The Digital Karl Barth Library is Barth’s magnum opus, the 14-volume Kirchliche Dogmatik.

Every document in The Digital Karl Barth Library is hand-keyed and features metadata tagging specifically designed to meet the research needs of religious-studies scholars. The same dedication to scholarly research has guided the development of the search and presentation platform, which enables users to perform highly sophisticated searches and to view, organize, and analyze results with extraordinary speed and precision. For example, researchers can return comprehensive, accurate results in seconds for the following kinds of queries:

  • Find all references to Hitler in Barth’s letters;
  • In Barth’s academic writings, identify words that occur most frequently in close proximity with the keyword λογος;
  • Locate instances where Barth discusses tribulation and suffering in his sermons;
  • Searching all Barth’s works, find all citations of Romans, chapter one.

Inspecting the Capitoline Venus in Rome, August 1954 [http://kbarth.org/gallery/nggallery/karl-barth/time-off]

You may also be interested: Karl-Barth Archiv: https://karlbarth.unibas.ch/